2000 Series

2000—STUDENT LEARNING GOALS

A basic education is an evolving program of instruction that is intended to provide students with the opportunity to become responsible and respectful global citizens, to contribute to their economic well-being and that of their families and communities, to explore and understand different perspectives, and to enjoy productive and satisfying lives. With the involvement of parent and community members, the goal of the district is to provide opportunities for every student to develop the knowledge and skills essential to:

A. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;

B. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; arts; and health and fitness;

C. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and

D. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

These goals will be placed within a context of a performance-based educational system in which high standards are set for all students. Parents are primary partners in the education of their children, and students take responsibility for their learning. How instruction is provided to meet these learning goals is the decision of the school board and district educators. An assessment system for determining if students have successfully learned the essential academic learning requirements based on the student learning goals will be adopted by the district, as required by state law.

Legal References: RCW 28A.150.210 Basic education— Goals of school districts
RCW 28A.655.010 Washington commission on Student Learning — Definitions

Management Resources: Policy News, October 2007 Basic Education Act Revisions

Adoption Date: 4/26/18
Raymond School District #116


2004—ACCOUNTABILITY GOALS

High School Graduation Rate Goals

The board shall annually adopt district-wide graduation goals and direct each high school to annually establish goals, subject to board approval, to increase the percentage of on-time graduates receiving a high school diploma beginning with the class of 2004.

The minimum graduation rate goals through 2013 shall be as defined in WAC 180-105-060. Graduation rate goals in 2014 and each year thereafter for each group of students, identified in federal requirements, shall not be less than 85 percent.

District and School Reading and Mathematics Improvement Goals

The board shall adopt district-wide performance improvement goals for reading and mathematics for elementary, middle and high school (grade level bands); and direct each school in the district that administers the statewide assessment to adopt performance improvement goals to increase the percentage of students meeting the standard in reading and mathematics.

The following goals and calculation methodologies shall be established to measure and improve student achievement in reading and mathematics within the grade level bands as measured by the Washington Assessment of Student Learning administered in the spring of 2003 through and including the spring of 2014.

1. The baseline of achievement for the district and schools within the grade level bands on the reading and mathematics assessments for each grade are the starting points established using the federal requirements in the Washington State No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Accountability Plan.

2. The goal for the district and for each school is to increase the percentage of students in the following categories in meeting or exceeding the reading and mathematics improvement goals on the state uniform bar as established using the federal requirements in the Washington State No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Accountability Plan:

  • All students;
  • Students of each major racial and ethnic group;
  • Economically disadvantaged students;
  • Students served in Special Education; and
  • Students served in the state’s Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program.

3. The district and all schools shall demonstrate satisfactory progress toward the performance improvement goals by meeting the federal requirements or by showing improvements using the alternative “Safe Harbor” calculation.

Once a year the board shall issue a report to parents and present it in a public meeting. The report shall include the following:

A. The district’s and buildings’ improvement goals.
B. Student performance relative to the goals.
C. District and building plans to achieve the goals, including curriculum and instruction, parent and guardian involvement, and resources available to parents and guardians to assist students in meeting the state standards.

Annually the district will report in a news release the district’s progress toward meeting the district and building goals. The report shall also be included in each school’s annual school report.

Legal References:

RCW 28A.655.100 Performance goals – Reporting requirements
WAC 180-105-020 Reading and Mathematics
WAC 180-105-060 High School Graduation

Management Resources:

Policy News, June 2010 High School Proficiency Examinations
Policy News, Dec 2005 Requirements Revised
Policy News, Oct 2003 A+ Commission’s Revised Performance Improvement Goals
Policy News, June 1999 Accountability Bill Includes Policy Implications
Policy News, June 1998 Boards must set reading goals
Policy News, Aug 1998 CORRECTION: Reading goals policy

Adoption Date: 7/22/10
Raymond School District #116



2005—SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANS

Each school shall develop and adopt a school improvement plan or process, with annual review for progress and necessary changes. Each school shall submit its plan to the board of directors by June 30th of each year for initial approval and annual review and approval.

Each school improvement plan or process shall be data driven and shall promote a positive impact on student learning. A positive impact on student learning means promoting the continuous achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, and the achievement of nonacademic growth in areas like public speaking, leadership, interpersonal relationship skills, team work, self-confidence and resiliency, so that students can meet the goals of Washington’s basic education system: to become responsible citizens, to contribute to their own economic well-being and that of their families and communities, and to enjoy productive and satisfying lives.

Each school improvement plan or process shall be based on a building self-review that includes the active participation and input of building staff, students, parents, and community members.

Each school improvement plan or process shall address the following elements:

Characteristics of effective schools as identified by the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the educational service district (a plan may focus on one or several of the characteristics for up to three years);

  1. Safe and supportive learning environments;
  2. Educational equity factors including gender, race, ethnicity, culture, language and physical and mental abilities.
  3. Use of technology;
  4. Parent and community involvement; and
  5. Other factors identified by the school community for inclusion in the plan or process.

Any school participation in a program of school improvement assistance through the state accountability system or the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act shall constitute sufficient compliance with this policy.

Legal References:

WAC 180-16-220 Supplemental basic education program approval requirements

Adoption Date: 12/17/02
Raymond School District #116



2010—LEARNING IMPROVEMENT TEAMS

Learning Improvement Teams

Student learning is at the core of the school district’s mission. Since students’ learning needs vary and learning is most successful in a highly supportive environment in which teachers, students, parents and others work closely and harmoniously together, it is essential to focus attention on plans for improving student learning at each school. In developing and implementing those plans school staff must work closely with parents, community members and, where appropriate, students.

Learning Improvement Team Responsibility

A Learning Improvement Team (LIT) shall be established and maintained at each school building in the district. The charge of each team is to develop a plan for its school by specifying the activities, necessary human and material resources and budget that will improve student learning in the school. Each team is also charged with adopting bylaws, subject to board approval, for its operation. The teams shall operate within the district’s policies, unless waived by the board; budget parameters established by the board, the requirements of contracts to which the district is a party and all other legal constraints. The teams’ activities, decisions and recommendations shall be consistent with the district’s strategic plan and shall contribute to achieving district goals.

Once a school’s learning improvement plan has been approved by the board, the team shall meet at regular intervals to review progress toward the plan’s goals, to develop actions and strategies which may contribute to the plan’s success, and annually to evaluate and report to the board on the progress of the student learning improvement plan.

Learning Improvement Plan Approval

The learning improvement plan developed by each team shall be reviewed, seconded and approved by the building principal before being submitted to the school board. If the principal does not approve the plan, he or she shall work with the LIT until consensus is achieved. The board shall conduct a public hearing on the plan and may refer a plan back to a Learning Improvement Team with recommendations for change. When approved by the board the plan shall be submitted to the superintendent of public instruction as part of the district’s application for student learning improvement grants.

Learning Improvement Team Operations

Each Learning Improvement Team shall develop its own bylaws to govern its operations. The bylaws shall be submitted to the board for review and approval. As a minimum the bylaws shall:

1) identify the membership of the team and, as a minimum, include the principal, non-administrative certificated staff, classified staff, parents, members of the community served by the school, and students (in middle and high schools); provided that, members of any one of the foregoing groups shall not constitute a majority of the team;

2) assure that the school’s diversity is adequately reflected on the team with particular reference to ethnic minorities, disabled students, exceptionally talented students, and (in high school) non-college bound students;

3) provide that, whenever practicable, team members shall be elected by the group they represent. In the absence of an election an open process for application and appointment by the board shall be established;

4) emphasize decision by consensus in order to encourage the development of decisions which have the support of most of the school community. Voted decisions shall be acceptable, but the decision-making practices of a team shall be one factor in the team’s annual evaluation;

5) provide for annual self-evaluation of the work of the team as part of its report to the board; and

6) identify the communication responsibilities of the team and its members for the purpose of keeping informed all people with an interest in the work of the school.

The superintendent shall establish the interim procedures for identifying the members of the initial Learning Improvement Teams. Such procedures shall be consistent with the above criteria and effective until the bylaws are developed and approved.

Learning Improvement Team Training

The learning improvement plan shall be amended annually to identify training activities for both staff and team members. Training for team members shall provide for understanding the role of the team, for developing the skills to be effective on the team, and for understanding the various educational issues which affect student learning.

Learning Improvement Team Accountability

The superintendent, in collaboration with the Learning Improvement Teams, shall develop evaluation instruments and procedures for the teams which include the following criteria:

  • What are the specific results from the student learning improvement plan and other team activities?
  • Is there evidence of improved student performance, improved school climate, or improved support for the school among parents, students and the community?
  • Has the team operated within its delegated authority by focusing on plans and strategies to improve learning? Has the team avoided micro-management?
  • Has the team effectively used consensus decision making?
  • Is there trust among team members, within the school and with the district?
  • Does the team act in the best interest of all students?
  • Are team decisions objectively reached?
  • Do the team’s decisions reflect consideration of the need for consistency and compatibility among schools in the district?

When considering its options does the team take into account general community reaction and satisfaction?

Annually each team shall assess its own performance and include its conclusions in its report to the board.

Since the Learning Improvement Teams are the agents of the school board, the board remains liable for their actions which are reasonably within the authority granted to them. Therefore, the board reserves the right to review the work of a team at any time.

Communications

The learning improvement plan shall identify specific communications activities that will keep the general community informed about efforts to improve learning as well as keep specific audiences, such as parents, students, and staff, informed about the work of the teams. The communications responsibilities of members of the LIT shall be identified in the team’s bylaws.

Implementation

The annual reports from the Learning Improvement Teams shall be considered by the board in conjunction with its annual review of the district’s strategic plan. The superintendent shall develop procedures or guidelines to implement the provisions of this policy and assist both the board and the teams by making any recommendations which will enhance the success of the teams and achieve the district’s goals. The principals shall be both members of their respective teams and technical advisers to their teams and shall assist the superintendent in achieving the purposes of this policy.

Cross References:
Board Policy 0510 Vision Statements
Board Policy 0520 Beliefs
Board Policy 0530 Mission
Board Policy 0550 Goals, Target Objectives and Strategies
Board Policy 0560 Strategic Action Plans
Board Policy 0700 Strategic Plan Evaluation
Board Policy 5021 Applicability of Personnel Policies

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.210 Basic Education Act–Goals
RCW 28A.300.130 Educational improvements and research–Center for the improvement of student learning–Clearinghouse for commission on student learning and for information regarding education restructuring and parental involvement programs
Chapter 28A.655 RCW Academic Achievement and Accountability
RCW 28A.300.138 Student Learning Improvement
RCW 70.190.040 Finding–Grants to improve readiness to learn
Ch. 180-18 WAC Waivers for restructuring purposes
WAC 392-140-800 to 836 Local Enhancement Funds

Adoption Date: 10/16/00
Raymond School District #116



2020‑COURSE DESIGN, SELECTION AND ADOPTION OF INSTRUCTION MATERIALS

The board recognizes its responsibility for the improvement and growth of the educational program of the schools. To this end, the course designs shall be evaluated, adapted and developed on a continuing basis.  Instructional materials shall be selected to ensure alignment with state learning standards and enable all students to master foundational skills and knowledge to achieve college and career readiness.

Definitions

For the purpose of policy and procedure 2020, the following definitions will apply:

Course Design is the process that includes identifying and sequencing essential content supporting students’ skill development towards state learning standards. Course design involves providing appropriate instructional materials, professional development, and support systems for teachers as they implement the course.

Instructional Materials are all materials designed for use by students and their teachers as learning resources to help students to acquire facts, skills, and/or to develop cognitive processes. These instructional materials, used to help students meet state learning standards, may be printed or digital, and may include textbooks, technology-based materials, other educational media, and assessments. They may carry different licensing types from open to all rights reserved. For the purposes of this policy, there are five categories of instructional materials:

Core Instructional Materials are the primary instructional resources for a given course. They are district-approved and provided to all students to help meet learning standards and provide instruction towards course requirements.

Alternative Core Materials are the primary instructional materials for a given course that are used with a subset of students. These materials are intended to replace approved core materials and may be used for specialized course offerings or flexible learning environments.

Intervention Materials are designed to support strategic or intensive intervention for students who are at risk of not meeting established learning standards. Intervention materials are used with students to accelerate progress toward particular learning goals based on systematic assessment, decision-making, and progress monitoring.

Supplemental Materials are used in conjunction with the core instructional materials of a course. These items extend and support instruction. They include, but are not limited to, books, periodicals, visual aids, video, sound recordings, computer software and other digital content.

Temporary Supplemental Materials are those items used in conjunction with the core instructional materials of a course that are of interest or value for a short period of time and are chosen within district-established guidelines. They are not intended to supplant the adopted curriculum nor be used on a regular instructional basis. Examples might include timely articles from relevant, reliable sources, websites, or news broadcasts. The use of temporary supplemental materials for time periods of over one year requires consideration of the material as either part of the core instructional material for a course or supplemental material for the course depending on the nature and scope of the material.

Instructional Materials Committee is the body that makes core instructional materials adoption recommendations to the School Board based on superintendent-established procedures.

Course Design

The superintendent or designee will establish procedures for course design that:

  • Provide for the regular review of selected content areas and implementation of any suggested changes.
  • Provide for involvement of community representatives and staff members at appropriate times.

Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials

The primary objective in selecting instructional materials is to implement, enrich and support the educational program of the schools. All instructional materials will be selected in conformance with:

A. Applicable state and federal laws;

B. Goals and/or learning standards of the district and state; and

C. Procedures established by the instructional materials committee which address the criteria detailed in the corresponding procedure 2020P.

The board is responsible for the adoption of all core materials used in the district.

The superintendent, or designee, will establish procedures for core material, alternate core, and intervention material selection and adoption using criteria around evidence-based practices.

The superintendent will ensure that a listing of all core instructional materials used within the school curriculum is maintained in the district and is available for public review either in-person or online.

The intent of the board is that the superintendent delegate responsibility for examining, evaluating, and selecting all supplemental and temporary supplemental materials to the professional staff of the district. This includes preparing all student reading lists. Staff will rely on reason and professional judgment in the selection of high quality supplemental materials that align to state learning standards and are appropriate for the instructional program and developmental level and interests of their students.

Cross References:
2027 – District Ownership of Staff-Created Work

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.230 District school directors’ responsibilities
RCW 28A.320.230 Instructional materials — Instructional materials committee
RCW 28A.320.170 Tribal history and culture[as amended by SSB 5433]
RCW 28A.405.060 Course of study and regulations —Enforcement — Withholding salary warrant for failure
Chapter 28A.640 RCW Sexual Equality
WAC 180-44-010 Responsibilities related to instruction
WAC 392-190-055 Textbooks and instructional materials — Scope — Elimination of bias

Management Resources:
2015 – December Issue

Adoption Date: 02/25/16
Raymond School District #116



2020P‑PROCEDURE COURSE DESIGN, SELECTION AND ADOPTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

For the purposes of this procedure, the definitions from Policy 2020 will apply.

District course design and core instructional materials should be regularly reviewed to ensure their ongoing alignment with state law, teaching and learning standards, and research-based best practices. All students will receive high quality core instruction and, as appropriate, strategic and intensive intervention supports matched to student needs.

Course Design

Existing Courses

The superintendent or designee will establish a regular cycle of course design review and development that includes examination by review committees composed of district subject area coordinators and, as appropriate, external content area experts. This review cycle should be based on student need, changing demographics and funding.  The cycle should cover each content area to ensure current course relevance. The course design process should review:

A.Relevance, rigor, and alignment to state learning standards;

B.Efficacy of core, alternative core, and intervention instructional materials that support student learning; and

C. Processes and resources used to assess student progress and address teacher professional learning.

Recommendations of this review may lead to:

D. Affirmation of continued use of current processes and instructional materials;

E. Establishment  of a timeline for completion of recommended tasks;

F. Creation and assignment of tasks to subcommittees as required to select, write, or revise the course design;

G. Recommendation of new instructional materials selection to the Instructional Materials Committee;

H. Design of course implementation and staff development plans;

I.Identification of projected budget needs in accordance with established timelines; and/or

J. Maintained communications with impacted stakeholders.

Social studies curriculum review or adoption

In compliance with RCW 28A.320.170, when the board adopts or reviews the district’s social studies curriculum, it will incorporate history, culture and government of the nearest federally recognized Indian tribe or tribes utilizing curriculum available on the OSPI website. The district may modify the OSPI curriculum to incorporate elements that have a regionally specific focus or may incorporate the curriculum into existing instructional materials.

During regularly scheduled reviews and revisions of their social studies and history curriculum thereafter, the district will collaborate with any federally recognized Indian tribe within its boundaries and with neighboring Indian tribes to expand and improve instructional materials about Indian tribes and to create programs of classroom and community cultural exchange.

The district will collaborate with the office of the superintendent of public instruction on curricular areas regarding tribal government and history that are statewide in nature.

New Courses or Major Modifications to Existing Courses

New course offerings or major course modifications that propose significant changes to course objectives or scope will be reviewed by the superintendent or designee prior to being scheduled to ensure that the course is rigorous, utilizes appropriate instructional materials, and is a carefully considered part of the school’s college and career pathways.

When the implementation of new or modified courses requires the adoption of new instructional resources, those resource recommendations will be forwarded to the Instructional Materials Committee for consideration by the process outlined below.

Instructional Material Type Certificated Teaching Staff Role Principal’s Role
Core Material identify
Alternative Core identify
Intervention identify
Supplemental identify Designate selector
Temporary Supplemental select within district guidelines

Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials

For the purposes of this procedure, instructional materials used in the school district will be classified as core, alternative core, intervention, supplemental, and temporary supplemental and shall be selected according to the procedures that follow. The principal is responsible for ensuring the continuing familiarity of his/her certificated staff with the requirement of this policy and procedure. The district office will provide such technical assistance as may be necessary to accomplish this.

Roles and Responsibilities in the Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials

Instructional Material Delivery Formats

Instructional materials may be delivered in many formats, and may include textbooks, technology-based materials, or other educational media.

Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. A wide variety of free, high quality instructional content is available from supplemental to core instructional materials. District staff are encouraged to consider OER when selecting instructional materials. OER are subject to the same selection and adoption procedures as other instructional materials outlined in this document.

Technology-based Resources

When instructional materials are technology based, district educational technology staff should be consulted regarding the technological impacts of the suggested program. Equity of access for students and teachers must be considered for all core materials delivered in digital formats.

Core Instructional Material Selection

Instructional Materials Committee

The Instructional Materials Committee (IMC) is formed to establish and monitor such procedures as may be necessary for the evaluation and recommendation of core materials used by the district in conformance to stated criteria. The committee will act upon requests for core material approval and will evaluate and act upon citizens’ requests for reconsideration of core materials.

Committee meetings will be held on a schedule determined by the district.  Special meetings may be called by the committee chairman if necessary. The committee secretary will provide department heads, principals, and program developers with copies of the committee meeting schedule.

The committee will consist of: staff and community members. Instructional Materials Committees may include parents, but state law provides that parents must make up less than one-half the committee.

Members will be appointed by the superintendent or designee through the district’s committee process. Membership must be approved by the Board of Directors. The chairman and the secretary will be permanent members of the committee. Other members will have three-year terms. Temporary appointments of one year or less may be made to fill vacancies.

Criteria for Selection of Core Instructional Materials

Core instructional materials shall be selected based upon the degree to which they:

A. Demonstrate likelihood of impact as shown by scientific or evidence-based research;

B. Enable implementation of the district’s developed curriculum and meet state standards and College Readiness requirements;

C. Provide sufficient flexibility to meet the varied needs and abilities of the students served;

D. Provide clear and appropriate differentiation components for English Language Learners, special education students, students with academic opportunity gaps, and highly capable students;

E. Where appropriate, present balanced but differing views of issues, controversial or otherwise, in order that students may develop critical analysis and informed decision-making skills;

F. Demonstrate consideration of appropriate format(s) (including technological, visual, and/or auditory components);

G. Support an equitable access to learning and learning materials for all students; including the provision of appropriate, high-quality accessible instructional materials to all students with disabilities who require them; and

H. Are free of stereotyping and gender, race, class, and other forms of bias, recognizing that under certain circumstances biased materials may serve as appropriate resources to present contrasting and differing points of view, and biased materials may be employed in order to teach students about bias, stereotyping, and propaganda in historical or contemporary contexts. The Washington Models for the Evaluation of Bias Content in Instructional Materials, published by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) should be consulted in the selection process to further to the goal of eliminating content bias: https://www.k12.wa.us/CurriculumInstruct/InstructionalMaterialsReview.aspx.

Identification of Core Instructional Materials

Core materials shall be initially selected by such certificated staff as the superintendent or designee may assign. Materials must meet the Criteria for the Selection of Core Materials above.

Recommendation of Core Instructional Materials

The IMC will receive recommended district material proposals through superintendent-assigned staff. Core material will be reviewed according to superintendent-established procedures to ensure compliance with the above selection criteria and by using instructional material evaluation tools listed on the OSPI website: https://www.k12.wa.us/CurriculumInstruct/InstructionalMaterialsReview.aspx

Based on their evaluation, the IMC will recommend instructional materials to the board for adoption.

Adoption of Core Instructional Materials

Core material will be approved by the board prior to their use in classrooms. Texts selected previously are exempt from this requirement.

Regularly Scheduled Core Material Updates

Any courses using OER as their core material shall annually convene a representative group of district teachers of the course to revise and improve the core material. Adaptations shall be based on teacher and student suggestions and data from state or district assessments identifying areas of lower student performance. Revised versions of the core material will be implemented for the following school year.

If the adaptations to the core material results in significant changes to course objectives or scope, the revised resource shall be forwarded to the Instructional Materials Committee for consideration and, formal recommendation for board adoption.

Exceptional Needs or Rapidly Changing Circumstances

The superintendent or designee may authorize the acquisition of alternative core instructional materials to meet exceptional needs or rapidly changing circumstances. However, expanded use of core instructional materials selected for exceptional needs will require adoption through the formal process.

College in the High School, Advanced Placement (AP), and/or International Baccalaureate (IB)

College in the High School, AP, and/or IB courses may have varying course designs as necessitated by their course credit transfer requirements.

Field Testing

The superintendent or designee may consider the use of field testing as part of the adoption process. Field testing can provide a flexible opportunity to investigate the effectiveness of curricular approaches, instructional materials, and/or assessment resources through careful experimentation for an identified purpose based on student needs.

Trial-use core instructional material of an experimental, field-test nature may be authorized for use by the superintendent for a period of no more than one school year prior to adoption through the formal process.

Citizen Access to View Core Materials

Members of the community are invited to review any core instructional materials in current or proposed use. Such review may be accomplished at the school, in the district office, or online. The review and examination process should be arranged in a way to avoid disrupting the educational program. The review of core materials should be undertaken with the knowledge of district objectives in mind.

Intervention Instructional Material Selection

Instructional materials designed to support strategic or intensive intervention for students who are at risk of not meeting established learning standards will be approved by the superintendent or designee based upon evidence from reputable sources (e.g., National Center on Response to Intervention, Johns Hopkins Best Evidence Encyclopedia).

Alternative Core Instructional Material Selection

The superintendent, or designee, will establish procedures through which schools may be approved to use alternative core materials for specialized course offerings or flexible learning environments. In many cases, the superintendent may decide that selection of these alternative core materials be made by certificated staff designated by the building principal.

Supplemental Material Selection

Supplemental materials will not require IMC approval or board adoption.

The superintendent shall delegate responsibility for examining, evaluating, and selecting all supplemental and temporary supplemental materials to the principal or professional staff of the district. This includes preparing all student reading lists using state standards-aligned resources/repositories. Staff will rely on reason and professional judgment in the selection of high quality supplemental materials that align to state learning standards and are appropriate for the instructional program and developmental level and interests of their students. While supplemental materials do not require item-by-item approval of the IMC, staff are expected to thoroughly preview such materials and to give due consideration to the text complexity, developmental level of students; appropriateness of language or images; bias against racial, gender, ethnic, or other social groups; and other sensitive issues.

Temporary Supplemental Material Selection

Professional staff of the district will rely on reason and professional judgment in the selection of high quality temporary supplemental materials that are appropriate for the instructional program and developmental level and interests of their students.

Protest Procedure for Instructional Materials

When a parent/guardian or employee challenges any instructional materials used or restricted from use in the schools, the following steps should be taken:

1. Concerns should first be discussed with the certificated teacher and/or the school principal. All parties are urged to resolve the concern at this level.

2. If the concerns cannot be resolved through discussion at the school level, the following steps will be taken and the challenged instructional material will continue to be used until a decision is rendered:

a. If the challenged instructional material is supplemental in nature, at a parent’s written request to the principal, the supplemental material may be asked to be withdrawn from their student. The principal shall facilitate a meeting of the complainant(s) and appropriate school staff.  Following the meeting, the principal shall respond with a written decision. If warranted by the scope of the supplemental material, an appeal may be submitted to the superintendent or designee requesting review by the Instructional Materials Committee and a written decision.

b. If the instructional material is core, alternative core, or intervention material, the parent/guardian or employee may register a request for reconsideration with the Superintendent or designee. This request will be forwarded to the Instructional Materials Review committee. The IMC will review the complaint and establish a timely process for public consideration of the complaint, if appropriate.

All instructional material reconsideration decisions will be by majority vote of the IMC and are final. Decisions of the committee will be delivered in writing to the superintendent, complainant, and affected staff within ten (10) school business days.

Adoption Date: 02/25/16
Raymond School District #116



2020F—CITIZEN’S REQUEST FOR RECONSIDERATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Request initiated by:

Telephone:

Complainant represents Self/Organization

The material I object to is as follows:

Film

Recording

Magazine

Pamphlet

Library Book

Textbook

Other

Is this material, to your knowledge, on a student reading list?

Title

Author

Publisher

1. Are you aware of the district objective in using this material?

2. Are you familiar with the district policy regarding selection of instructional materials?

3. To what in the material(s) do you object? Please be specific, cite pages or sections:

4. What do you feel might be the result of reading, seeing or using this material?

5. For what age group would you recommend this material?

6. Is there anything of value in the material?

7. Did you read, hear, or see the entire content? If not, what parts?

8. Are you aware of the judgment of this material by literary or subject matter critics?

9. What do you believe is the theme of this material?

10. What would you like your school to do about these materials?

Do not assign it to my child

Do not give it to my child

Withhold from all students

11. In its place, what material of equal quality would you recommend that would convey as valuable a picture and perspective?

Signature of Complainant



2021—LIBRARY INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

The purpose of the Raymond School District library information and technology programs is to support student mastery of the essential academic learning requirements and state standards in all subject areas.  The programs will provide a broad, flexible array of services, resources and instruction.

The Teacher-Librarian, through the library information and technology programs, will collaborate as an instructional partner and information specialist to help all students meet the content goals in all subject areas and to assist high school students in completing their culminating project and High School and Beyond Plans.

Additionally, the Teacher-Librarian’s duties may include, but are not limited to, integrating information and technology into curriculum and instruction; providing instruction to students and staff regarding use of emerging learning technology; providing instruction to students as to appropriate use of computers and mobile devices at school; helping teachers and staff access and use information ethically; instructing students in digital citizenship; promoting a culture of reading within the school community; and providing individual support and guidance for students.  
 
The superintendent will establish procedures for the selection of materials with the understanding that media literacy resources will consist of a balance of sources and perspectives. Citizens who wish to express a concern about specific material included in the collection may do so according to the procedures outlined in Procedure 2021P, with the understanding that the criteria and rationale for reconsideration of library resources differs from the criteria and rationale for reconsideration of classroom/curricular instructional materials.

Cross References:
2020 – Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials
2020P – Procedure – Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.230 – Instructional Materials — Instructional materials committee
RCW 28A.320.240 – School Library Media Programs — Stocking of libraries — Teacher – Librarians
WAC 392-204-005, 009, 020, 025, 055 Library Media Centers:
WAC 392-204-005 Purpose and authority
WAC 392-204-009 Definitions
WAC 392-204-020 School library media program
WAC 392-204-025 Services
WAC 392-204-055 Other sources

Management Resources:
2017 – July Issue
2015 – December Issue
2011 – April Issue
Policy News, October 2007 Elimination of Outdated and Obsolete Policies
Policy News, April 2005 State Board of Education Revises Library Media Rules

Adoption Date: 10/26/17
Raymond School District #116



2021P‑LIBRARY INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

A. Library Collection Development
 This procedure guides Teacher-Librarians and informs the community about the process for selecting, acquiring, evaluating and maintaining library information and technology program materials. The objective of each program is to implement, support and enrich the educational program of the district.

To best meet the unique needs of each school, the district will strive to create a library collection based upon an assessment of student and staff needs. This will be accomplished by:

  1. Providing resource materials, both curricular and personal for students and faculty;
  2. Providing materials that meet the interest, vocabulary, maturity and ability levels of all students;
  3. Providing a diversity of materials in the interest of achieving a balance of sources and perspectives;
  4. Fostering reading as a lifelong activity through pleasurable exposure to printed and digital materials; and
  5. Including materials in the collection because of their academic, literary and/or artistic value and merit.

B. Library Materials and Electronic Resources Library materials or digital services are those items accessible through the library information and technology program that provide support for an area of the curriculum, information for independent study, or resources for enrichment and recreational interest. Electronic resources include access to electronic documents, databases and websites.

C. Suggestions for Acquisition: Suggestions for acquisition or electronic resources may originate from students, parents, community members and teachers. Library information and technology staff will weigh requests, evaluate materials and select those which fulfill the needs of the instructional program. Teacher-Librarians in each school determine final selections.

D. Selection

1. Sources for the selection of materials include but are not limited to:

a.Vendor catalogs, American Historical Fiction, Basic Book Collection for Elementary Grades, the Best in Children’s books, Children and Books, Children’s Catalog, Elementary School Library Collection, European Historical Fiction and Biography, Guide to Sources in Educational Media, Junior High School Catalog Reference Books For School Libraries, Subject Guide To Children’s Books in Print, Subject Index to Books for Intermediate Grades, Subject Index to Books for Primary Grades, and Westinghouse Learning Directory.

b. Current review journals:

  • AASA Science Books and Films
  • American Film & Video Association Evaluations
  • Kirkus Reviews
  • Media and Methods
  • School Library Journal
  • Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
  • Horn Book
  • KLIATT
  • VOYA
  • Booklist

2. All items selected for placement in the school library will:

a. Support and be consistent with the general educational goals of the State of Washington and Raymond School District and the aims and objectives of individual schools and specific courses;

b. Support and be consistent with school library media and information literacy standards established by the American Association of School Librarians as well as content area standards established by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Washington;

c. Meet high standards of quality in factual content and presentation;

d. Contain appropriate subject matter for the age, emotional development, ability level, learning styles, and social development of the students for whom they are selected;

e. Serve the intended purpose, in both physical format and appearance for library materials;

f. Help students gain an awareness of our pluralistic society;

g. Motivate students and staff to examine their own duties, responsibilities, rights, and privileges as participating citizens in our society, and to make informed judgments in their daily lives;

h. Withstand scrutiny based on their strengths rather than be rejected for their weakness; and

i. Clarify historical and contemporary forces by presenting and analyzing intergroup tension and conflict objectively, placing emphasis on recognizing and understanding social and economic problems.

E. Gifts/Donations Materials donated to the school library will be accepted or declined in accordance with the criteria applied to the purchase of materials.

F. Collection Assessment De-selection (weeding) of outdated and damaged materials is a natural part of the library’s life cycle and maintenance of the quality and integrity of the collection. The Teacher-Librarian will evaluate the library collection on a continuing basis in order to assure that the collection meets the mission statement and goals of the Raymond School District.

G. Considerations for De-selection

  1. Currency – The subject matter is out of date or no longer relevant to the instructional program;
  2. Physical Condition – Item is worn, soiled, missing pages, antiquated in appearance or unattractive;
  3. Not circulating for a reasonable amount of time;
  4. Superseded by newer editions;
  5. Perpetuates cultural, ethnic, or sexual stereotypes;
  6. Inappropriate reading level; or
  7. Unneeded duplication of materials.

D. Request for Reconsideration of Library Media Materials When a concern is expressed about library resources, the Teacher-Librarian will consider both the citizen’s right to express an opinion and the principles of intellectual freedom.

1. Informal Reconsideration Persons wishing to make a complaint regarding library resources will be asked to direct their complaint to the Teacher-Librarian. The Teacher-Librarian will attempt to resolve the issue informally by:

a. Discussing the request with the complainant and listening carefully to the concerns expressed;

b. Explaining why the material was selected, and how its inclusion in the collection was guided by the district collection development policy/procedure; and

c. Share review sources for the item in question;

d. If the informal process does not resolve the matter, the complainant may submit a formal request for reconsideration of Library resources. Library materials in question will remain in the collection until the process is completed and a final decision is made.

2. Formal Reconsideration The building principal will be informed whenever a citizen asks for a Request for Reconsideration of Library/Media Materials form. The Request for Reconsideration of Materials form, together with a copy of the challenged materials process will be furnished to the complainant by the principal. The formal process will follow the process required by Procedure 2020P for a written challenge, with the understanding that the criteria and rationale for reconsideration of library materials differs from classroom/district adopted materials. When reviewing a challenge to library materials the instructional review committee will:

a. Examine the Request for Reconsideration form;

b. Read and evaluate the book/material in question;

c. Study thoroughly all materials referred and read available reviews. The general acceptance of the materials should be checked by consulting standard evaluation aids and holdings in other schools;

d. Discuss the book/material in the context of the educational program and the audience for which it was selected;

e. Consider the entire work, rather than extracting passages or parts. Weighing the values and faults against each other and weighing the conflicting opinions based on the materials as a whole; and

f. Base the final decision upon the appropriateness of the material for its intended educational use.

​The decision of the Instructional Materials Committee may be appealed by a concerned party to the Board of Directors, by submitting a written request to the office of the superintendent. The purpose of the Board of Director’s review will be to determine whether the committee applied the appropriate criteria and followed the proper process.

The superintendent will notify the concerned parties of the findings of the board’s review.

If the correct criteria and process were followed by the Instructional Materials Committee, the decision of the committee stands. If it is determined they were not followed, the Board of Directors will determine the outcome of the challenge.

The decision regarding challenged materials will not be subject to reconsideration for a minimum of three years, unless there is a substantive change of circumstances as determined by the superintendent.



2022—ELECTRONIC RESOURCES

The Raymond Board of Directors recognizes that an effective public education system develops students who are globally aware, civically engaged, and capable of managing their lives and careers. The board also believes that staff and students need to be proficient and safe users of information, media, and technology to succeed in a digital world.

Electronic Resources

The district will develop and use electronic resources as a powerful and compelling means for students to learn core subjects and applied skills in relevant and rigorous ways and for staff to educate them in such areas of need. It is the district’s goal to provide students with rich and ample opportunities to use technology for important purposes in schools just as individuals in workplaces and other real-life settings use these tools. The district’s technology will enable educators and students to communicate, learn, share, collaborate and create; to think and solve problems; to manage their work; and to take ownership of their lives.

The superintendent or designee will: 1) create strong electronic resources and develop related educational systems that support innovative teaching and learning; 2) provide appropriate staff development opportunities regarding this policy; and 3) develop procedures to support this policy. The superintendent or designee is authorized to develop procedures and acceptable use guidelines for staff and students as to use of district electronic resources, including those that access Internet and social media, and to regulate use of personal electronic resources on district property and related to district activities.

Internet Safety

To help ensure student safety and citizenship with electronic resources, all students will be educated about Internet safety. This will include appropriate online behavior, including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, and cyberbullying awareness and response.

To promote Internet safety and appropriate online behavior of students and staff as they use electronic resources and access material from the Internet, the superintendent or designee is authorized to develop or adopt Internet safety procedures, acceptable use guidelines, and, for students, related instructional materials for every grade level. The superintendent or designee in evaluating such procedures and instructional materials should take into account District electronic resources, community norms, privacy rights, responsible use, and issues of concern with student or staff use of electronic resources.

As a component of district Internet safety measures, all district-owned electronic resources, including computer networks and Wi-Fi, in all district facilities capable of accessing the Internet must use filtering software to prevent access to obscene, racist, hateful or violent material. However, given the ever-changing nature of the Internet, the district cannot guarantee that a student will never be able to access objectionable material.

Further, when students use the Internet from school facilities for educational purposes, district staff will make a reasonable effort to supervise student access and use of the internet.  If material is accessed that violates district policies, procedures or student guidelines for electronic resources or acceptable use, district staff may instruct the person to cease using that material and/or implement sanctions consistent with district policies, procedures, guidelines, or student codes of conduct.

Cross References:
5281 – Disciplinary Action and Discharge
4400 – Election Activities
4040 – Public Access to District Records
3241 – Classroom Management, Corrective Actions Or Punishment
3231 – Student Records
3207 – Prohibition of Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying
2025 – Copyright Compliance
2020 – Curriculum Development and Adoption of Instructional Materials

Legal References:
18 USC 2510-2522 Electronic Communication Privacy Act
Pub. L. No. 110-385 Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act

Management Resources:
2015 – June Issue
2012 – October Issue
2012 – February Issue
Policy News, June 2008 Electronic Resources
Policy News, June 2001 Congress Requires Internet Blocking at School
Policy News, August 1998 Permission required to review e-mail

Adoption Date: 08/25/15
Raymond School District #116



2022P—ELECTRONIC RESOURCES

K-20 Network Acceptable Use Guidelines/Internet Safety Requirements

These procedures are written to support the Electronic Resources Policy of the board of directors and to promote positive and effective digital citizenship among students and staff. Digital citizenship represents more than technology literacy. Successful, technologically-fluent digital citizens live safely and civilly in an increasingly digital world. They recognize that information posted on the Internet is public and permanent and can have a long-term impact on an individual’s life and career. Expectations for student and staff behavior online are no different from face-to-face interactions.

Use of Personal Electronic Devices

In accordance with all district policies and procedures, students and staff may use personal electronic devices (e.g. laptops, mobile devices and e-readers) to further the educational and research mission of the district. School staff will retain the final authority in deciding when and how students may use personal electronic devices on school grounds and during the school day.

Network

The district network includes wired and wireless devices and peripheral equipment, files and storage, e-mail and Internet content (blogs, websites, collaboration software, social networking sites, wikis, etc.). The district reserves the right to prioritize the use of, and access to, the network.

All use of the network must support education and research and be consistent with the mission of the district.

Acceptable network use by district students and staff include:

A. Creation of files, digital projects, videos, web pages and podcasts using network resources in support of education and research;

B. Participation in blogs, wikis, bulletin boards, social networking sites and groups and the creation of content for podcasts, e-mail and webpages that support education and research;

C. With parental permission, the online publication of original educational material, curriculum related materials and student work. Sources outside the classroom or school must be cited appropriately;

D. Staff use of the network for incidental personal use in accordance with all district policies and procedures; or

E. Connection of personal electronic devices (wired or wireless) including portable devices with network capabilities to the district network after checking with (insert title of position, i.e., technology director, IT director, assistant superintendent) to confirm that the device is equipped with up-to-date virus software, compatible network card and is configured properly. Connection of any personal electronic device is subject to all procedures in this document.

Unacceptable network use by district students and staff includes but is not limited to:

A. Personal gain, commercial solicitation and compensation of any kind;

B. Actions that result in liability or cost incurred by the district;

C. Downloading, installing and use of games, audio files, video files, games or other applications (including shareware or freeware) without permission or approval from staff;

D. Support for or opposition to ballot measures, candidates and any other political activity;

E. Hacking, cracking, vandalizing, the introduction of viruses, worms, Trojan horses, time bombs and changes to hardware, software and monitoring tools;

F. Unauthorized access to other district computers, networks and information systems;

G. Cyberbullying, hate mail, defamation, harassment of any kind, discriminatory jokes and remarks;

H. Information posted, sent or stored online that could endanger others (e.g., bomb construction, drug manufacturing);

I. Accessing, uploading, downloading, storage and distribution of obscene, pornographic or sexually explicit material; or

J. Attaching unauthorized devices to the district network. Any such device will be confiscated and additional disciplinary action may be taken.

The district will not be responsible for any damages suffered by any user, including but not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, mis-deliveries or service interruptions caused by his/her own negligence or any other errors or omissions. The district will not be responsible for unauthorized financial obligations resulting from the use of, or access to, the district’s computer network or the Internet.

Internet Safety Personal Information and Inappropriate Content:

A. Students and staff should not reveal personal information, including a home address and phone number on web sites, blogs, podcasts, videos, social networking sites, wikis, e-mail or as content on any other electronic medium;

B. Students and staff should not reveal personal information about another individual on any electronic medium without first obtaining permission;

C. No student pictures or names can be published on any public class, school or district website unless the appropriate permission has been obtained according to district policy; and

D. If students encounter dangerous or inappropriate information or messages, they should notify the appropriate school authority.

Filtering and Monitoring

Filtering software is used to block or filter access to visual depictions that are obscene and all child pornography in accordance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA). Other objectionable material could be filtered. The determination of what constitutes “other objectionable” material is a local decision.

A. Filtering software is not 100 percent effective. While filters make it more difficult for objectionable material to be received or accessed, filters are not a solution in themselves. Every user must take responsibility for his/her use of the network and Internet and avoid objectionable sites;

B. Any attempts to defeat or bypass the district’s Internet filter or conceal Internet activity are prohibited (e.g., proxies, https, special ports, modifications to district browser settings and any other techniques designed to evade filtering or enable the publication of inappropriate content);

C. E-mail inconsistent with the educational and research mission of the district will be considered SPAM and blocked from entering district e-mail boxes;

D. The district will provide appropriate adult supervision of Internet use. The first line of defense in controlling access by minors to inappropriate material on the Internet is deliberate and consistent monitoring of student access to district devices;

E. Staff members who supervise students, control electronic equipment or have occasion to observe student use of said equipment online, must make a reasonable effort to monitor the use of this equipment to assure that student use conforms to the mission and goals of the district; and

F. Staff must make a reasonable effort to become familiar with the Internet and to monitor, instruct and assist effectively.

G. The district will provide a procedure for students and staff members to anonymously request access to Internet websites blocked by the district’s filtering software. The procedure will indicate a timeframe for a designated school official to respond to the request. The requirements of the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) will be considered in evaluation of the request. The district will provide an appeal process for requests that are denied.

Internet Safety Instruction

All students will be educated about appropriate online behavior, including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, and cyberbullying awareness and response.

A. Age appropriate materials will be made available for use across grade levels.

B. Training on online safety issues and materials implementation will be made available for administration, staff and families.

Copyright

Downloading, copying, duplicating and distributing software, music, sound files, movies, images or other copyrighted materials without the specific written permission of the copyright owner is generally prohibited. However, the duplication and distribution of materials for educational purposes is permitted when such duplication and distribution falls within the Fair Use Doctrine of the United States Copyright Law (Title 17, USC) and content is cited appropriately.

Ownership of Work

All work completed by employees as part of their employment will be considered property of the district. The District will own any and all rights to such work including any and all derivative works, unless there is a written agreement to the contrary.

All work completed by students as part of the regular instructional program is owned by the student as soon as it is created, unless such work is created while the student is acting as an employee of the school system or unless such work has been paid for under a written agreement with the school system. If under an agreement with the district, the work will be considered the property of the District. Staff members must obtain a student’s permission prior to distributing his/her work to parties outside the school.

Network Security and Privacy

Network Security

Passwords are the first level of security for a user account. System logins and accounts are to be used only by the authorized owner of the account for authorized district purposes. Students and staff are responsible for all activity on their account and must not share their account password.

The following procedures are designed to safeguard network user accounts:

A. Change passwords according to district policy;

B. Do not use another user’s account;

C. Do not insert passwords into e-mail or other communications;

D. If you write down your user account password, keep it in a secure location;

E. Do not store passwords in a file without encryption;

F. Do not use the “remember password” feature of Internet browsers; and

G. Lock the screen or log off if leaving the computer.

Student Data is Confidential

District staff must maintain the confidentiality of student data in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

No Expectation of Privacy

The district provides the network system, e-mail and Internet access as a tool for education and

research in support of the district’s mission. The district reserves the right to monitor, inspect,

copy, review and store without prior notice information about the content and usage of:

A. The network;

B. User files and disk space utilization;

C. User applications and bandwidth utilization;

D. User document files, folders and electronic communications;

E. E-mail;

F. Internet access; and

G. Any and all information transmitted or received in connection with network and e-mail use.

No student or staff user should have any expectation of privacy when using the district’s network. The district reserves the right to disclose any electronic messages to law enforcement officials or third parties as appropriate. All documents are subject to the public records disclosure laws of the State of Washington.

Archive and Backup

Backup is made of all district e-mail correspondence for purposes of public disclosure and disaster recovery. Barring power outage or intermittent technical issues, staff and student files are backed up on district servers regularly. Refer to the district retention policy for specific records retention requirements.

Disciplinary Action

All users of the district’s electronic resources are required to comply with the district’s policy and procedures (and agree to abide by the provisions set forth in the district’s user agreement). Violation of any of the conditions of use explained in the (district’s user agreement), Electronic Resources policy or in these procedures could be cause for disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion from school and suspension or revocation of network and computer access privileges.


2023—LESSON PLANS

To insure proper planning and continuity of instruction, each teacher shall prepare lesson plans for daily instruction. To facilitate effective instruction and in preparation for possible substitute teachers, lesson plans must be prepared sufficiently in advance of class presentation. The format for the lesson plans will be specified by the building principal, shall be reviewed on a regular basis and must be readily available in the event a substitute teacher is needed.

Legal References:

WAC 180-44-010 Responsibilities related to instruction

Adoption Date: 5/23/00
Raymond School District #116



2024—ONLINE LEARNING

The Raymond Board of Directors believes that a variety of learning options, including online courses and programs, are critical for 21st century learners. The board recognizes that the online learning environment provides students with unique opportunities to become self-disciplined learners with life-long learning skills. Further, the board believes that online learning provides tremendous opportunities for students to access curriculum and specialized courses in a flexible learning environment that might not otherwise be available.

Therefore, the board supports a range of online learning opportunities that are equally accessible to all students in the school district. The board directs the superintendent to provide information to parents, students and staff regarding online learning options and the guidelines for participation.

The superintendent or designee will develop procedures to implement this policy. The procedures will include, but not be limited to, a description of student access to online learning courses/grade level coursework, student eligibility criteria, the types of online courses available to students, methods the district will use to support student success, payment of course fees and other costs, granting of course credit, and conditions under which no credit will be awarded.

Cross References:
Policy 2022 Electronic Resources
Policy 2255 Alternative Learning Experience Programs
Policy 2410 Graduation Requirements

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.220 Basic Education – Minimum instructional requirements – Program accessibility – Rules
Chapter 28A.225 RCW Compulsory School Attendance and Admission
RCW 28A.230.090 High School graduation requirements or equivalencies – Reevaluation of graduation requirements – Review and authorization of proposed changes – Credit for courses taken before attending high school – Postsecondary credit equivalencies
Chapter 28A.250 RCW Online Learning
RCW 28A.320.035 Contracting out – Board’s powers and duties – Goods and services
Chapter 180-51 WAC High School Graduation Requirements
WAC 392-121-182 Alternative learning experience requirements
WAC 392-121-188 Instruction provided under contract
WAC 392-410-310 Equivalency course of study – Credit for correspondence courses, electronically mediated courses, and college courses
Chapter 392-502 WAC Online Learning – Approval of multidistrict on-line providers

Management Resources:
Policy & Legal News, February 2014 Other Updates/Corrections
Policy News, December 2009 Online Learning Policy Required

Adoption Date: 5/22/14
Raymond School District #116



2024P – Online Learning

Definitions

Online courses or “grade level coursework” means a course in which:

  • more than half of the content is delivered online;
  • more than half of the instruction is delivered online by a teacher from a different location than that of the student; a certificated teacher has the primary responsibility for the student’s instructional interaction. Instructional interaction between the teacher and the student includes, but is not limited to, direct instruction, review of assignments, assessment, testing, progress monitoring, and educational facilitation; and Students have access to the teacher synchronously and/or asynchronously.

Online school program means a school program that offers a sequential set of online courses or grade-level coursework throughout the school year in a manner that could provide a full-time basic education program if so desired by the student. The student may enroll as a part-time or full-time student.

Online provider means any provider of an online course or program, including multidistrict online providers, all school district online learning programs, and all regional online learning programs.

The Online Learning Support Team includes the teachers, registrar and any paraprofessionals assigned. They will provide assistance to the student in accessing courses, understanding coursework and maintaining successful progress in the course.

Student Access to Online Courses and Online School Programs The district may facilitate access to the following types of online learning opportunities:

Online courses:

District-created and taught online courses;

District-taught online courses created by a third-party contracted provider; and

Courses created and taught online by OSPI-approved online providers.

Online school programs:

District-created and -taught online school programs;

District-sponsored programs created and taught by OSPI-approved online providers;

District-sponsored programs created by third-party course providers and taught by district teachers; or

Out-of-district online school programs accessed through an interdistrict transfer.

Types of Online Courses Available
 The district may facilitate access to the following types of online courses:

Credit recovery courses allowing students to make up failed credits needed for graduation;

Advanced Placement courses;

World language courses;

Courses which may already be offered in the student’s school but are inaccessible to the student due to scheduling or other factors;

Courses not available at the student’s school that meet four-year college entrance requirements;

Elective and Career and Technical Education courses;

Standard-level courses meeting high school graduation requirements;

Grade level coursework for K-8; and

A course from a provider that is not approved by OSPI that meets the criteria for district use.

Student Eligibility Criteria 
The district may facilitate access to online learning courses and programs for students enrolled in all grades. Students taking an online course or participating in a district-created online school program must adhere to the following criteria:

Have completed any required prerequisites and provide teacher/counselor recommendations to confirm that he/she possesses the academic level needed to function effectively in an online learning environment;

Comply with existing district policies for registering/enrolling in a course or district program; and

Students interested in attending an online school program in another district must follow the interdistrict transfer procedures in Policy 3141 prior to entering that program.

Supporting Student Success The district will provide the following support to students to help ensure a successful online learning experience:

All online students will receive assistance from the local online learning support team;

The registrar will advise students in selecting and registering for online learning options to which the district facilitates access;

The local advisor will meet regularly with online students to ensure they are connecting to the online coursework and the online teacher and are making satisfactory progress in their online coursework;

The district will offer a dedicated class period during the school day in which the student may connect to an online course and to their local advisor; and

The district will offer access to online computers during the school day.

Costs/Fees

Courses offered to students for which the district claims state education funding, or that are included as part of the regular school day, will be paid for by the school district. Students/families may be responsible for fees as specified by the district fee schedule.

Courses offered to students for which the district claims no state education funding and that are not included as part of the regular school day will be paid for by the student or their families. Students/families may also be responsible for fees as specified by the district fee schedule.

Granting of High School Credit for Online Courses

School districts will award credit and grades for online high school courses successfully completed by a student that meet the school district’s graduation requirements and are provided by an approved online provider. Credit for online courses will be granted in the same manner as other course offerings in the district;

Currently enrolled students should notify the district prior to enrolling in an online course provided outside of the district. The student and/or parent will be informed, in writing, whether or not the course is eligible for academic credit from the district;

For students transferring credit from online courses or programs taken while enrolled outside of the district, credit will be granted according to the district transfer credit policy 2410; and

For eligible courses, if course credit is earned, the course will be recorded on the transcript using the standardized identifier for online courses provided in the Comprehensive Education Data Research System (CEDARS).

Prior to enrollment, students and/ or parents will be informed in writing whether a course is eligible for academic credit.

Information to Students and Parents or Guardians The district will use a variety of methods to provide information to parents/guardians and students regarding online learning opportunities. Information will be provided through the district Web page, counseling office brochures, newsletters, the student handbook and other appropriate district communication resources. Information provided will include descriptions of online courses or online school programs, enrollment information, potential fees, a description of credit awarded for courses, student eligibility requirements and methods the district will use to support student success.

Criteria for District Use of Non-OSPI Approved Online Courses

The district may offer courses to students from providers not on the OSPI approved list only after ensuring that they meet the criteria for district use of non-approved providers as posted on the OSPI Website.

The district will ensure proper documentation when using non-approved online providers.

Student Responsibilities

Adhere to the district’s code of conduct for academic integrity;

Comply with course/program participation and completion requirements;

Maintain high academic involvement;

Notify the district if participation in an online course/program ceases or changes;

Maintain agreed-upon levels and kinds of communication with the local advisor throughout the term of the online course; and

Participate in an online course/program orientation.

Parent or Guardian Responsibilities

Parents or guardians are responsible for costs/fees as outlined above in the Cost/Fees section. And

Parents or guardians are responsible for seeking appropriate technology – per district recommendations – for student participation in coursework outside of the school day or designated online learning period.

District Responsibilities:

Inform parents/guardians prior to student enrollment in any online course or program;

Inform staff, parents/guardians and students of the online courses and programs that are available to them;

Inform staff, parents/guardians and students of the online course/online school program prerequisites, technology requirements, course outlines, syllabi and possible fees;

Provide online students who remain enrolled in the district and who participate in the online course or program during the school day, with computing hardware and connectivity required for participation in the online course or online school program;

Inform staff, parents/guardians and students of how to seek and access technology resources and technological requirements beyond the school day;

Provide online students with an online learning support team;

Ensure communication between the student’s local advisor and parent/guardian;

Ensure online courses are appropriately identified with CEDARS coding; and

The district will inform students and their parent/guardian of rescheduling options or grade impacts in the event a student withdraws from an online course or online school program prior to completion.

Adoption Date: 6/15/17
Raymond School District #116


2025—COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE

The board recognizes that federal law makes it illegal to duplicate copyrighted materials without authorization of the holder of the copyright, except for certain exempt purposes. Severe penalties may be imposed for unauthorized copying or using of audio visual or printed materials and computer software, unless the copying or using conforms to the “fair use” doctrine.

Under the “fair use” doctrine, unauthorized reproduction of copyrighted materials is permissible for such purposes as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship or research. If duplicating or changing a product is to fall within the bounds of fair use, these four standards must be met for any of the foregoing purposes:

A. THE PURPOSE AND CHARACTER OF THE USE. The use must be for such purposes as teaching or scholarship.

B. THE NATURE OF THE COPYRIGHTED WORK. Staff may make single copies of: book chapters for use in research, instruction or preparation for teaching; articles from periodicals or newspapers; short stories, essays or poems; and charts, graphs, diagrams, drawings, cartoons or pictures from books, periodicals, or newspapers in accordance with these guidelines.

C. THE AMOUNT AND SUBSTANTIALITY OF THE PORTION USED. Copying the whole of a work cannot be considered fair use; copying a small portion may be if these guidelines are followed.

D. THE EFFECT OF THE USE UPON THE POTENTIAL MARKET FOR OR VALUE OF THE COPYRIGHTED WORK. If resulting economic loss to the copyright holder can be shown, even making a single copy of certain materials may be an infringement, and making multiple copies presents the danger of greater penalties.

While the district encourages its staff to enrich the learning programs by making proper use of supplementary materials, it is the responsibility of district staff to abide by the district’s copying procedures and obey the requirements of the law. In no circumstances shall it be necessary for district staff to violate copyright requirements in order to perform their duties properly. The district cannot be responsible for any violations of the copyright law by its staff.

Any staff member who is uncertain as to whether reproducing or using copyrighted material complies with the district’s procedures or is permissible under the law should contact the superintendent or the person designated as the copyright compliance officer. The latter will also assist staff in obtaining proper authorization to copy or use protected material when such authorization is required.

The superintendent or designee shall file with the federal Copyright Office, and post the same information on the district’s web site, his or her designation as the district’s agent, in the district’s role as an Internet service provider, to receive notifications that claim that users of the district’s Internet network have infringed copyright.

Cross References:

Board Policy 2022 Electronic Information Systems (Network)

Legal References:

P.L. 94-553 Federal Copyright Law of 1976 (U.S. Code, Title 17)
P.L. 105-304 Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998

Adoption Date: 2/26/02
Raymond School District #116



2025P—COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE

Staff may make copies of copyrighted school district materials that fall within the following guidelines. Where there is reason to believe the material to be copied does not fall within these guidelines, prior permission shall be obtained from the principal. Staff members who fail to follow this procedure may be held personally liable for copyright infringement.

Authorized Reproduction and Use of Copyrighted Material in Print

A. Materials on the Internet should be used with caution since they may be copyrighted.

B. Proper attribution (author, title, publisher, place and date of publication) should always be given.

C. Notice should be taken of any alternations to copyrighted works, and such alternations should only be made for specific instructional objectives.

D. Care should be taken in circumventing any technological protection measures. While materials copied pursuant to fair use may be copied after circumventing technological protections against unauthorized copying, technological protection measures to block access to materials may not be circumvented.

In preparing for instruction, a teacher may make or have made a single copy of:

A. A chapter from a book;

B. An article from a newspaper or periodical;

C. A short story, short essay or short poem; or

D. A chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon or picture from a book, periodical or newspaper.

A teacher may make multiple copies not exceeding more than one per pupil, for classroom use or discussion if the copying meets the tests of “brevity, spontaneity and cumulative effect” set by the following guidelines. Each copy must include a notice of copyright.

A. Brevity

1. A complete poem, if less than 250 words and two pages long, may be copied; excerpts from longer poems cannot exceed 250 words;

2. Complete articles, stories or essays of less than 2500 words or excerpts from prose works less than 1000 words or 10% of the work, whichever is less may be copied; in any event, the minimum is 500 words;

3. Each numerical limit may be expanded to permit the completion of an unfinished line of a poem or prose paragraph;

4. One chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon or picture per book or periodical issue may be copied. “Special” works cannot be reproduced in full; this includes children’s books combining poetry, prose or poetic prose. Short special works may be copied up to two published pages containing not more than 10 percent of the work.

B. Spontaneity – Should be at the “instance and inspiration” of the individual teacher when there is not a reasonable length of time to request and receive permission to copy.

C. Cumulative Effect – Teachers are limited to using copied material for only one course in the school in which copies are made. No more than one short poem, article, story or two excerpts from the same author may be copied, and no more than three works can be copied from a collective work or periodical column during one class term. Teachers are limited to nine instances of multiple copying for one course during one class term. Limitations do not apply to current news periodicals, newspapers and current news sections of other periodicals.

Performances by teachers or students of copyrighted dramatic works without authorization from the copyright owner are permitted as part of a teaching activity in a classroom or instructional setting. All other performances require permission from the copyright owner.

The copyright law prohibits using copies to replace or substitute for anthologies, consumable works, compilations or collective works. “Consumable” works include: workbooks, exercises, standardized tests, test booklets and answer sheets. Teachers cannot substitute copies for the purchase of books, publishers’ reprints or periodicals, nor can they repeatedly copy the same item from term-to-term. Copying cannot be directed by a “higher authority”, students cannot be charged more than actual cost of photocopying.

Teachers may use copyrighted material in overhead or opaque projectors for instructional purposes.

Authorized Reproduction and Use of Copyrighted Materials in the Library

A library may make a copy or three digital copies of:

A. An unpublished work which is in its collection;

B. A published work in order to replace it because it is damaged, deteriorated, lost or stolen, provided that unused replacement cannot be obtained at a fair price.

C. A work that it being considered for acquisition, although use is strictly limited to that decision. Technological protection measures may be circumvented for purposes of copying materials in order to make an acquisition decision.

A library may provide a single copy of copyrighted material to a student or staff member at no more than the actual cost of photocopying. The copy must be limited to one article of a periodical issue or a small part of other material, unless the library finds that the copyrighted work cannot be obtained elsewhere at a fair price. In the latter circumstance, the entire work may be copied. In any case, the copy shall contain the notice of copyright and the student or staff member shall be notified that the copy is to be used only for private study, scholarship or research. Any other use may subject the person to liability for copyright infringement.

At the request of a teacher, copies may be made for reserve use. The same limits apply as for single or multiple copies designated in “Authorized Reproduction and Use of Copyrighted Material in Print.”

Authorized Reproduction and Use of Copyrighted Music

A teacher may make a single copy of a song, movement, or short section from a printed musical work that is unavailable except in a larger work for purposes of preparing for instruction.

A teacher may make multiple copies for classroom use of an excerpt of not more than 10% of a printed musical work if it is to be used for academic purposes other than performance, provided that the excerpt does not comprise a part of the whole musical work which would constitute a performable unit such as a complete section, movement, or song. In an emergency, a teacher may make and use replacement copies of printed music for an imminent musical performance when the purchased copies have been lost, destroyed or are otherwise not available.

A teacher may make and retain a single recording of student performances of copyrighted material when it is made for purposes of evaluation or rehearsal.

A teacher may make and retain a single copy of excerpts from recordings of copyrighted musical works for use as aural exercises or examination questions.

A teacher may edit or simplify purchased copies of music provided that the fundamental character of the music is not distorted. Lyrics shall not be altered or added if none exist.

Performance by teachers or students of copyrighted musical works is permitted without the authorization of the copyright owner as part of a teaching activity in a classroom or instructional setting. The purpose shall be instructional rather than for entertainment.

Performances of non-dramatic musical works which are copyrighted are permitted without the authorization of the copyright owner, provided that:

A. The performance is not for a commercial purpose;

B. None of the performers, promoters or organizers are compensated; and

C. Admission fees are used for educational or charitable purposes only.

All other musical performances require permission from the copyright owner.

Off-Air Recording of Copyrighted Programs

Television programs, excluding news programs, transmitted by commercial and non-commercial television stations for reception by the general public without charge may be recorded off-air simultaneously with broadcast transmission (including simultaneous cable retransmission) and retained by a school for a period not to exceed the first forty-five (45) consecutive calendar days after date of recording. Upon conclusion of this retention period, all off-air recordings must be erased or destroyed immediately.

Off-air recording may be used once by individual teachers in the course of instructional activities, and repeated once only when reinforcement is necessary within a building, during the first ten (10) consecutive school days, excluding scheduled interruptions, in the forty-five (45) calendar day retention period.

Off-air recordings may be made only at the request of and used by individual teachers, and may not be regularly recorded in anticipation of requests. No broadcast program may be recorded off-air more than once at the request of the same teacher, regardless of the number of times the program may be broadcast.

A limited number of copies may be reproduced from each off-air recording to meet the legitimate needs of teachers. Each additional copy shall be subject to all provisions governing the original recording.

After the first ten (10) consecutive school days, off-air recordings may be used up to the end of the forty-five (45)calendar day retention period only for evaluation purposes, i.e., to determine whether or not to include the broadcast program in the teaching curriculum. Permission must be secured from the publisher before the recording can be used for instructional purposes after the ten (10) day period.

Off-air recordings need not be used in their entirety, but the recorded programs may not be altered from their original content. Off-air recordings may not be physically or electronically combined or merged to constitute teaching anthologies or compilations.

All copies of off-air recordings must include the copyright notice on the broadcast program as recorded.

Authorized Reproduction and Use of Copyrighted Computer Software

Schools have a valid need for high-quality software at reasonable prices. To assure a fair return to the authors of software programs, the school district shall support the legal and ethical issues involved in copyright laws and any usage agreements that are incorporated into the acquisition of software programs.

To this end, the following guidelines shall be in effect:

A. All copyright laws and publisher license agreements between the vendor and the district shall be observed;

B. Staff members shall take reasonable precautions to prevent copying or the use of unauthorized copies on school equipment;

C. A back-up copy shall be purchased, at least, for use as a replacement when a program is lost or damaged. If the vendor is not able to supply such, the district, in accordance with P.L. 96-517, Section 7(b), shall make a back-up program and attest that the program will be used for replacement purposes only;

D. The principal is authorized to sign a software license agreement on behalf of the school. A copy of said agreement shall be retained by the principal.

E. A computer program may be adapted by adding to the content or changing the language. The adapted program may not be distributed.

FAIR USE GUIDELINES FOR EDUCATION MULTIMEDIA

A. Fair use does not include posting a student or teacher’s work on the Internet if it includes portions of copyrighted materials.

Permission to copy shall be obtained from the original copyright holder(s) before such projects are placed online.

B. The opening screen of such presentations shall include notice that they were prepared under the fair use exemption of the US copyright law and are restricted from further use.

C. Students may incorporate portions of copyrighted materials in producing educational multimedia projects for a specific course, and may perform, display or retain the projects.

D. Educators may perform or display their own multimedia projects to students in support of curriculum-based instructional activities. These projects may be used:

1. in face-to-face instruction;

2. in demonstration and presentations, including conferences;

3. in assignments to students;

4. for remote instruction if distribution of the signal is limited;

5. over a network that cannot prevent duplication for fifteen days, after fifteen days a copy may be saved on-site only;

6. in their personal portfolios.

Educators may use copyrighted materials in a multimedia project for two years, after that permission must be requested and received.

E. The following limitations restrict the portion of any given work that may be used pursuant of fair use in an educational multimedia project:

1. Motion media: ten percent or three minutes, whichever is less;

2. Text materials: ten percent or 1,000 words, whichever is less;

3. Poetry: an entire poem of fewer than 250 words, but no more than three poems from one author or five poems from an anthology. For poems of greater than 250 words, excerpts of up to 250 words may be used, but no more than three exerts from one poet or five exerts from an anthology.

4. Music, lyrics and music video: Up to ten percent, but no more than thirty seconds. No alterations that change the basic melody or fundamental character of the work.

5. Illustrations, cartoons and photographs: No more than five images by an artist, and no more than ten percent or fifteen images whichever is less from a collective work.

6. Numerical data sets: Up to ten percent or 2,500 field or cell entries, whichever is less.

Copying Limitations

Circumstances will arise when staff are uncertain whether or not copying is prohibited. In those circumstances, the superintendent or designated copy-right compliance officer should be contacted. The following prohibitions have been expressly stated in federal guidelines:

A. Reproduction of copyrighted material shall not be used to create or substitute for anthologies, compilations or collective works.

B. Unless expressly permitted by agreement with the publisher and authorized by district action, there shall be no copying from copyrighted consumable materials such as workbooks, exercises, test booklets, answer sheets and the like.

C. Staff shall not:

1. Use copies to substitute for the purchase of books, periodicals, music recordings, computer software or other copyrighted material except as permitted by district procedure;

2. Copy or use the same item from term to term without the copyright owner’s permission;

3. Copy or use more than nine instances of multiple copying of protected material in any one term;

4. Copy or use more than one short work or two excerpts from works of the same author in any one term; or

5. Copy or use protected material without including a notice of copyright. The following is a satisfactory notice: NOTICE: THIS MATERIAL MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW.

Staff shall not reproduce or use copyrighted material at the direction of someone in higher authority or copy or use such material in emulation of some other teacher’s use of copyrighted material without permission of the copyright owner.

Adoption Date: 10/24/00
Raymond School District #116



2026—Digital Citizenship and Media Literacy

A. PURPOSE
In recognition of the fact that students use technology to play, learn, and communicate while at home and at school, it is important that they learn how to use that technology responsibly. The District is committed to educating every student on how to use technology in ways that augment their learning experience, leading to analysis, evaluation, reflection, and enhanced skills of expression. As the District’s educators guide exploration of the digital landscape, they will encourage students to be critical and creative thinkers. Students, in turn, are expected to actively engage with and express their voices in the digital landscape.

B. DEFINITIONS
The District is dedicated to promoting and instilling principles of digital citizenship and media literacy in each of its students.

Digital Citizenship

Digital citizenship includes the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior related to current technology use, including digital and media literacy, ethics, etiquette, and security. Digital citizenship includes the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, develop, produce, and interpret media, as well as Internet safety and cyberbullying prevention and response.

Digital citizens recognize and value the rights, responsibilities, and opportunities of living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world, and they engage in safe, legal, and ethical behaviors. Digital citizens cultivate and manage their digital identity and reputation, and are aware of the permanence of their actions in the digital world. They advocate for themselves and others in their behavior, action, and choices.

Media Literacy

Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create, and act using a variety of forms of communication. Media literacy includes the ability to understand how and why media messages and images are constructed and for what purposes they are used.

Media literate citizens examine how individuals interpret messages differently based on their skills, beliefs, backgrounds, and experiences. They also consider how values and points of view are included or excluded in various media. Media literate citizens remain continually aware of the ways in which media can influence beliefs and behavior. In addition, media literate citizens are effective communicators, able to demonstrate critical and creative thinking as they utilize appropriate media creation tools. Further, they understand the conventions and characteristics of the tools they have selected.

Media literate citizens are able to adapt to changing technologies and develop the new skills required as they continue to engage in life-long learning. Media literacy empowers individuals to participate as informed and active citizens in a democracy.

C. ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION
The District aspires to implement the following practices to promote digital citizenship and media literacy for all students.

Student instruction

In recognition of the fact that students are consumers and creators of information and ideas, the District promotes cross-curricular integration of digital citizenship and media literacy and leadership instruction at all levels. The District recognizes the importance of students as active participants, role models, and peer mentors in addressing the following topics:

Online safety, responsibility, and security

Students will learn how to be safe and responsible digital citizens, and they will be encouraged to teach others about issues such as cyberbullying, social networking, online predators, and risky communications.

Media literacy

Students will learn how to produce their own media; how to examine the ways in which people experience or interact with media differently; how to identify embedded values and stereotypes; how to analyze words and images critically; and how to evaluate the various sources of information with which they are presented.

Law, fair use, copyright, and intellectual property

Students will learn about the importance of navigating the digital landscape in ways that are legal, including access to and use of copyrighted materials. Students will also learn how to access and create intellectual property legally.

Online identify and personal brand

Students will learn about their “digital footprint” and the persistence of their digital information, including on social media. Students will also learn about the creation and maintenance of their self-image, reputation, and online identity.

Ethics, digital communications, and collaboration

Students will learn about fairness and civil discourse in the digital environment, including the importance of collaborating and ethically interacting with others online.

Professional Development

The District endeavors to support teachers and instructional leaders in developing leadership skills and proficiency in the principles of digital citizenship and media literacy, both as an instructional imperative and as dynamic District policy and practice.

Policy and Practices

The District acknowledges the need for digital and online policies that are dynamic and responsive to diverse community standards and student learning outcomes. The District annually reviews its policies and procedures on electronic resources, Internet safety, digital citizenship, and media literacy. The District authorizes the Superintendent to develop further procedures and guidelines if appropriate.

Communications and Engagement

The District acknowledges that parents and community stakeholders are partners in developing students as digital citizens and life-long learners. The District encourages parents’ active engagement in the process of educating students to become media-literate digital citizens.

Cross References:
4217 – Effective Communication
5281 – Disciplinary Action and Discharge
4400 – Election Activities
4040 – Public Access to District Records
3241 – Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action
3231 – Student Records
3207 – Prohibition of Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying
2025 – Copyright Compliance
2020 – Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials

Legal References:
RCW 28A.650.010  Definitions
RCW 28A.650.045  Digital citizenship, internet safety, and media literacy

Management Resources:
2017 – December Policy Issue

Adoption Date: 1/25/18
Raymond School District #116


2030—SERVICE ANIMALS IN SCHOOLS

The Raymond Board of Directors acknowledges its responsibility to permit students and/or adults with disabilities to be accompanied by a “service animal” as required by federal laws and Washington State’s law against discrimination. This policy governs the presence of service animals in the schools, on school property, including school buses and at school activities.

A “service animal” means any dog or miniature horse that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The work or tasks performed by the service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability.

Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks,
  • Alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds,
  • Providing nonviolent protection or rescue work,
  • Pulling a wheelchair,
  • Assisting an individual during a seizure,
  • Alerting an individual to the presence of allergens,
  • Retrieving items, such as medicine or the telephone,
  • Providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and
  • Helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors

The crime deterrent effects of an animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks.

It is a civil infraction to misrepresent an animal as a service animal. A student’s parent/guardian who believes their student needs to bring a service animal to school or an employee who wishes to bring a service animal to school, must submit a written request to the building principal. The building principal, in consultation with the Section 504 coordinator or director of special services, as appropriate, will determine whether to permit the service animal in school. The principal shall not ask about the nature or extent of a person’s disability, but may make two inquires to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal. The principal may ask if the animal is required because of a disability and what work or task the animal has been trained to perform. The principal shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal, or require that the service animal demonstrate its task. The principal may not make these inquiries about a service animal when it is readily apparent that an animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability.

The superintendent will develop procedures to implement the policy.

Cross References: 5010 – Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action
3210 – Nondiscrimination
2162 – Education of Students With Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
2161 – Special Education and Related Services for Eligible Students
2029 – Animals as Part of the Instructional Program

 

Legal References: American Disabilities Act (ADA), Revised Title II Regulations, 35 Service animals
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
RCW 28A.642 Discrimination Prohibition
RCW 49.60.040 Definitions
WAC 162-26 Public accommodations, disability discrimination
WAC 392-145-021(3) General operating requirements
WAC 392-172A-01035 Child with a disability or student eligible for special education
WAC 392-172A-01155 (3) Related services
WAC 392-190 Equal education opportunity – Unlawful discrimination prohibited

Adoption Date: 2/26/19
Classification: Encouraged
Revised Dates: 06.11; 12.18



2030P—SERVICE ANIMALS IN SCHOOLS

Service Animal Uses
Service animals are any dog or miniature horse that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The work or tasks performed by the service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability.

Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks,
  • Alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds,
  • Providing nonviolent protection or rescue work,
  • Pulling a wheelchair,
  • Assisting an individual during a seizure,
  • Alerting an individual to the presence of allergens,
  • Retrieving items, such as medicine or the telephone,
  • Providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and
  • Helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors.

The crime deterrent effects of an animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks.

It is a civil infraction to misrepresent an animal as a service animal. Use of a service animal by a student with a disability will be allowed in school when it is determined that the student’s disability requires such use in order to assist or accommodate access to the instructional program, school services and/or school activities.

Use of a service animal by an employee with a disability will be allowed when such use is necessary as a reasonable accommodation to enable the employee to perform the essential functions of their job or to access benefits of employment provided to all employees in the same job classification.

The use of a service animal by an individual with a disability will not be conditioned on the payment of a fee, security deposit, or surcharge.

The principal shall not ask about the nature or extent of a person’s disability, but may make two inquires to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal. The principal may ask if the animal is required because of a disability and what work or task the animal has been trained to perform. The principal shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal, or require that the service animal demonstrate its task. The principal may not make these inquiries about a service animal when it is readily apparent that an animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability.

  1. Requirements for Service Animal Access
    Before a service animal will be permitted in school, on school property or at school sponsored events, the student’s parent or the employee must provide a description of the task(s) the service animal is expected to perform in assisting the person with a disability.The district will provide access to a person with a disability who needs a service animal provided that the tasks performed by the service animal are directly related to the disability; and the animal has been individually trained to perform a task, is housebroken; is free of disease and parasites, has a harness, leash or tether so it cannot run free and is under the control of the person with a disability.A service animal must also be licensed and immunized in accordance with the laws, regulations, and ordinances of the City of Raymond, Pacific county, and the state of Washington.
  2. Parents or Animal Handlers
    Parents or animal handlers who will be present in school for the purpose of assisting a student with his/her service animal are required to submit to a sex offender registry and criminal background check. In addition, parents and handlers must comply with all standards of conduct that apply to school employees and volunteers.
  3. Removal or Exclusion of a Service Animal from School or School Property
    The building principal or district administrator may request an individual with a disability to remove a service animal from school, a school sponsored activity, or school property if the animal is out of control and the animal’s handler does not take effective action to control the animal. Examples of the animal being out of control include, but are not limited to the following:

    1. The presence of the animal poses a direct threat to the health and/or safety of others;
    2. The animal significantly disrupts or interferes with the instruction program, school activities or student learning. However, annoyance on the part of the others is not an unreasonable risk to property or others to justify the removal of the service animal;
    3. The presence of the animal would result in a fundamental alteration of any school program;
    4. The individual in control of the animal fails to appropriately care for the animal, including feeding, exercising, taking outside for performance of excretory functions and cleaning up after the animal;
    5. The animal fails to consistently perform the function(s)/service(s) to assist or accommodate the individual with the disability;
    6. The animal is ill; or
    7. The animal is not housebroken.

If the district excludes a service animal, it will provide the individual with a disability the opportunity to participate in the service, program, or activity without having the service animal on the premises.

  1. Service Animals at School-Sponsored Events
    Individuals with disabilities may be accompanied by their service animals to events or activities open to the public that are held in schools or on school property.The building administrator may revoke or exclude the service animals for the reasons set forth in paragraph “D” above.
  2. Responsibility/Liability
    1. Neither the district, nor its employees, are responsible for the cost, care or supervision of the service animal. (See Policies 2161, Special Education and Related Services for Eligible Students, and 2162, Education of Students With Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, for responsibility for related services);
    2. A service animal must be under the control of its handler. A service animal must also have a harness, leash or other tether, unless either the handler is unable because of a disability to use a harness, leash or other tether, or the use of the harness, leash or other tether would interfere with the service animal’s safe, effective performance of work or tasks, in which case the service animal must be otherwise under the handler’s control (e.g., voice control, signals or other effective means); and
    3. The owner/handler of the service animal is responsible for any and all damage caused by the service animal at school, on school premises or at school activities.
  3. Appeals
    A parent or employee whose service animal has been excluded or removed may appeal the decision to the superintendent. If dissatisfied with the superintendent’s decision, the parent or employee may appeal to the board.
  4. Resources
    1. District Contact
      Superintendent
    2. Superintendent of Public Instruction
      Equity and Civil Rights Office
      P.O. Box 47200
      Olympia, WA  98504-7200
      360.725.6162
    3. Washington State Human Rights Commission
      711 South Capitol Way, Suite 402
      P.O. Box 42490
      Olympia, WA 98504-2490
      360.753.6770
    4. Office for Civil Rights
      U.S. Department of Education
      915 Second Avenue, Room 3310
      Seattle, WA  98174
      206.607.1600

Revised Dates: 06.11; 12.18



2080—COMPREHENSIVE STUDENT ASSESSMENT SYSTEM

The school district’s comprehensive student assessment system will focus on measuring student learning, specifically student achievement of the academic and technical skills and knowledge essential to meeting four student learning goals:

1. Read with comprehension, write with skill, and communicate effectively and responsibly in a variety of ways and settings;

2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history; geography; arts; and health and fitness;

3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate experience and knowledge to form reasoned judgements and solve problems; and

4. Understand the importance of work and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

The district will utilize a variety of assessment procedures and measures to assess student performance including norm-referenced tests, district-level and classroom -based performance assessments. The district believes that a variety of measures will give the most accurate picture of student performance. Teachers will be trained in the administration of assessments, including tests required by the Washington State Assessment Program . The district will adopt performance assessments as the state board of education implements these assessments.

Cross References:
Board Policy 2090 Program Evaluation
Board Policy 2421 Promotion/Retention

Legal References: RCW 28A. 630.883 Washington commission on student learning
RCW 28A. 630.886 Academic assessments – Implementation dates – Use by educators

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116


 


2090—PROGRAM EVALUATION

The board requires efficiency and effectiveness in all facets of its operations. In order to achieve this goal, the board will provide:

A. A clear statement of expectations and/or standards for the district’s instructional programs;

B. Staff, resources and support to achieve these stated expectations and/or standards; and

C. A plan for evaluating instructional programs and services to determine how well expectations and/or standards are being met.

The district will utilize a variety of assessment processes to:

A. Determine the effectiveness of the instructional programs,

B. Assess the progress of individual students in attaining student learning goals or standards,

C. Identify the needs of individual students who are not progressing at their expected rates, and

D. Identify students who are in need of specialized programs.

Parents who wish to examine any assessment materials may do so by contacting the superintendent. Parent approval is necessary before administering a diagnostic personality test. Parents will be notified of their child’s performance on any test or assessment conducted under the Washington State Assessment Program. No tests or measurement devices containing any questions about a student’s personal beliefs and practices or his/her family’s personal beliefs and practices in family life, morality and religion will be administered unless the parent or guardian gives written permission for the student to take such a test, questionnaire or examination.

The superintendent will prepare an annual report that reflects the degree to which district goals and objectives related to the instructional program have been accomplished. The superintendent will annually review the assessment processes and procedures to determine if the purposes of the evaluation program are being accomplished. Specifically, the district will adjust its curriculum if student performance under the Washington State Assessment Program indicates the district’s students need assistance in identified areas.

Legal References:
Chapter 28A.230 RCW Compulsory Coursework and Activities
WAC 392-500-020 Pupil tests and records — Tests — School district policy in writing
WAC 392-500-030 Pupil tests and records — Certain tests, questionnaires, etc. — Limitations
WAC 392-500-035 Pupil tests and records — Diagnostic personality tests — Parental permission required

Management Resource:
Policy News, December 2000 Portions of HB 1209 Take Effect

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116
Technical Fix: 01/07/2013



2090P—PROGRAM EVALUATION

Testing Program

A district program evaluation committee, representative of the staff, will meet at least once per year to review the district assessment program. The committee shall submit its recommendation to the superintendent for the following year’s assessment program by May 15. The recommendation shall include a schedule for all assessment activities to be conducted during the year. In its review, the committee shall consider such factors as:

A. Validity. Do the proposed assessment materials measure the district’s objectives? Are the items compatible with the district scope and sequence?

B. Administration. Are directions clear for the teacher? For the student? Is the format attractive?

C. Interpretation of Results. Are results reported in a form that is meaningful to the teacher, the student, the district, the parent?

The proposed schedule shall be approved by principals and by the superintendent. The schedule shall be distributed to individual schools by August 15. The district office shall be responsible for ordering tests, distributing materials and scoring sheets, and distributing administration instructions. After tests have been scored, the district office shall be responsible for:

A. Preparing reports on test results for board, instructional staff, parents/guardians and the general public.

B. Interpreting scores for staff and interested persons.

C. Disseminating individual scores to staff responsible for counseling, screening and special placement of individuals.

D. Preparing reports to evaluate curriculum and assist staff in implementing changes and improvements in curriculum.

Self-Study

The self-study cycle shall be as follows:

A. Initial study shall begin by September 1, 1986 and shall be completed by the end of 1990-91 school year.

B. Subsequent cycles will begin and end in five year time frames.

An annual report shall be submitted to the SPI by May 31 of each year which reflects the implementation of the self-study activities.

Adoption Date: 3/28/00
Raymond School District #116



2100—EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR MILITARY CHILDREN

The board recognizes that the children of military families encounter unique educational and emotional challenges related to enrollment, course placement and graduation because of frequent moves and deployment of their parents. To facilitate the placement, enrollment, graduation and provision of special services for students transferring into or out of the district because of their parents being on full-time active duty in the uniformed services of the United States, including members of the National Guard and Reserve on active duty orders, the district supports and will implement its responsibilities outlined in the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children (Compact), as adopted by the state of Washington. Uniformed services includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, as well as the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and public health services.

Eligible students are those enrolled in kindergarten through 12th grade who are children of active duty personnel, active duty personnel or veterans who have been severely injured and medically discharged and active duty personnel who die on active duty or as a result of injuries sustained on active duty for a period of one year after death. Students are not eligible for the provisions of the Compact if they are children of inactive National Guard or military reserves, retired personnel and veterans not included above, or U.S. Department of Defense personnel and other Federal civilian service employees and contract employees.

The superintendent will establish procedures to ensure full compliance with the law and to facilitate communication and coordination between sending/receiving schools in Washington and other Compact-member states.

Legal References:
Chapter 28A.705 RCW Interstate compact on educational opportunity for military children

Adoption Date: 08/23/11
Raymond School District #116



2100P—Educational Opportunities for Military Children

This procedure applies to eligible school-aged children enrolled in kindergarten through 12th grade. A sending school/district is the school from which the child of a military family is sent or brought or caused to be sent or brought; the receiving school/district is the school to which the child of a military family is sent, brought or caused to be sent or brought.

Enrollment and Educational Records

A. For every child of a military family in transition, the custodian of records in the sending school will provide on request unofficial or “hand-carried” education records to the parents so the student may transfer to another school. Sending schools may charge parents for the reasonable cost of reproduction of these records. The receiving school will, upon receipt of the hand-carried records, enroll and appropriately place the student based on this information, pending validation by official records.

B. Simultaneous with enrollment and conditional placement of the student, the receiving school will request from the sending school the student’s official education records. Upon receipt of this request, the sending school will provide these official records to the receiving school within ten business days, excluding school breaks (spring, summer and holidays).

C. The parent or guardian of an eligible child in transition must obtain and provide documentation on a health department approved Certificate of Immunization Status (CIS) form regarding all immunizations required by the Washington State Department of Health on or before the child’s first day of school. Students must obtain all immunizations required by the state of Washington within 30 calendar days from the date of enrollment. For vaccines administered in a series, the first of the series must be obtained within the first 30 calendar days from enrollment.

D. In order to be enrolled in the district under the special rules of the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children (Compact), students must provide, in addition to immunization records, official military orders showing that the child’s parent is a qualified member in the sending state. If a child formerly resided with a legal guardian other than the military parent, the student may provide proof of guardianship or other documentation to satisfy eligibility under the Compact. The student must also provide documentation from the sending school indicating the student’s record of attendance, academic information and grade placement, in addition to evidence of the student’s date of birth.

E. A child of a military family in transition will be allowed to continue his/her enrollment in the receiving school at the same grade level in which he/she was enrolled in the sending school, regardless of age. A student who has satisfactorily completed the prerequisite grade level in the sending school is eligible for enrollment in the next highest grade level in the receiving school, regardless of age. A student transferring after the start of the school year in the receiving school will enter the school on his/her validated level from an accredited sending school.

F. A child of a military family in transition who is placed in the care of a non-custodial parent or other person standing in loco parentis living in a jurisdiction other than that of the custodial parent may continue to attend the school in which he/she was enrolled while residing with the custodial parent. The school may not charge tuition in order to attend, but may charge tuition for optional programs for which tuition is normally required. Transportation to and from the school is the responsibility of the non-custodial parent, unless otherwise required by law.

G. A custody order, special power of attorney or other applicable document relative to the guardianship of a child of a military family and executed under the applicable law of each member state will be sufficient for the purposes of enrollment and other actions requiring parental participation and consent.

Graduation

H. The district will waive specific course requirements for graduation if similar course work has been satisfactorily completed in the sending school. If not waived, the district will provide reasonable justification for the denial and provide alternative means of satisfying the requirement so that graduation may occur on time. Receiving schools may also waive additional requirements (volunteer work, graduation project) in order to facilitate on-time graduation.

I. For students entering high school in the 11th and 12th grades the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, in accordance with state law, will determine completion of graduation testing requirements by considering current Washington student transfer options. These options will be considered as an alternative to graduation testing requirements in the receiving school. If such options cannot be accommodated for a student in his/her senior year, the following Section C will apply.

J. If a student transfers during his/her senior year and cannot graduate on time from the receiving school after all options have been considered, the receiving school will coordinate with the sending school to ensure that the student receives a diploma from the sending school if the student meets all the sending school’s requirements. If the sending school is not a member of the Compact, the receiving school shall use best efforts to facilitate the student’s on-time graduation.

Attendance, Placement and Co-curricular Activities

K. The district shall initially place a child of a military family in transition who transfers before or during the school year in educational courses based on the student’s enrollment in the sending state school and/or education assessments conducted at the sending school, to the extent that such courses are provided for by the receiving school. This includes but is not limited to: highly capable programs, honors, international baccalaureate, advanced placement, English as a second language and technical/career courses. The receiving school may perform subsequent evaluations to ensure the appropriate placement and continued enrollment of the student. The receiving school may allow the student to attend similar education courses in other schools within the district if the receiving school does not offer such courses.

L. In compliance with the federal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the receiving district will initially provide comparable services to a student with disabilities based on his/her current Individualized Education Program (IEP) developed at the sending school. The receiving school will also make reasonable accommodations and modifications to address the needs of incoming students with disabilities subject to a Section 504 plan. The district will also continue a student’s program under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The receiving school may perform subsequent evaluations to ensure the appropriate placement and continued eligibility of the student.

M. The district will facilitate the opportunity for the transitioning student’s inclusion in extracurricular activities, regardless of application deadlines, with consultation from the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association, and to the extent the student is qualified and space is available. Application deadlines include tryouts, summer conditioning and other coach or district prerequisites.

Absence Related to Deployment Activities

A student whose parent or legal guardian is a full-time, active member of the uniformed services and has been called to duty for, is on leave from or immediately returned from deployment to a combat zone or combat support posting shall be granted excused absences at the discretion of the superintendent to visit with his/her parent or legal guardian relative to such leave or deployment.

Assistance for Families

Families needing assistance concerning rights under the Compact should contact:

District Contact:

Dr. Stephen Holland, Superintendent
1016 Commercial St.
Raymond, WA 98577
360.942.3415

State Contact:

Dixie Grunenfelder, Program Supervisor
Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
360.725.6045, Dixie.grunenfelder@k12.wa.us

Military Contacts:

Norma Melo, Ed.M
Director of Youth Education Support Services
Child Youth and School Services
Joint Base Lewis McChord
253.967.7195, norma.melo@us.army.mil

Jason Gooding, M.A.Ed
School Liason Officer
Naval Station Everett
425.304.3688, Jason.gooding@navy.mil

Adoption Date: 08/23/11
Raymond School District #116



2104—FEDERAL AND/OR STATE FUNDED SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

The district will participate in those special programs that are funded by state and/or federal government for which a local need can be defined and for which a local program would be developed if funds were available. Board approval will be required before submission of an application for such a program. Applications may include, but are not limited to, programs for highly capable, remedial, and minority students.

Pursuant to federal law, school districts receiving Title I funds to provide educational services to students must do so in accordance with Title I. It is the Board’s intent that Title I funds will be used efficiently and effectively to benefit the academic opportunities and progress of students in School-wide or Targeted Assistance Programs.

Title I funds will be used to provide educational services that are in addition to the regular services provided for district students. By adoption of this policy, the board ensures equivalence among schools in teachers, administrators, and auxiliary personnel, and equivalence in the provision of curriculum materials and supplies.

The superintendent or designee will adopt procedures to ensure that planning, implementation, and evaluation phases of a special program comply with the rules and regulations of the funding agency.

Cross References: 2190 – Highly Capable Programs
2108 -– Learning Assistance Program

Legal References: RCW 28A.300.070 Receipt of federal funds for school purposes — Superintendent of public instruction to administer
20 U.S.C. 6321(c) Comparability of services

Adoption Date: 4/26/18
Raymond School District #116


2104P—FEDERAL AND/OR STATE FUNDED SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

Applications for special funds and/or categorical grants will be based upon the needs of the students, staff, or facilities within the district. Such applications may be related to the program needs of a particular building or the district as a whole. Each proposal for special funding and/or categorical grant should address the following points:

A. Needs: The proposal should supply hard data, and succinctly identify and/or document the specific needs that are to be addressed;

B. Objectives: The stated needs should be converted into objectives answering what the project hopes to accomplish;

C. Procedures: The action plan should be presented answering how the objectives will be accomplished; and

D. Evaluation: The evaluation plan should identify the kind of data to be collected along with identifying who should collect the data.

The proposal should also include a tentative budget that identifies proposed expenditures and revenues. A timeline should also be included, which shows the submission date deadline, funding agency approval date, and the project status report dates. The proposal writer must identify any obligations that the district will incur as a result of securing a grant award.

The principal or designee must approve the proposal before submission to the district office. Proposals should be submitted to the superintendent or designee at least two weeks prior to submission to the board.

When a project is approved, the business office will be given a copy of the grant award notice and will establish the appropriate accounting procedures for operating the special program.



2106—PROGRAM COMPLIANCE

Annually, on or before October 1, the superintendent will determine if the district is in compliance with the following program requirements:

A. Appropriate measures are taken to safeguard all student and school district permanent records against loss or damage;

B. Provision is made for the supervision of instructional practices and procedures;

C. Current basic instructional materials are available for required courses of study;

D. A program of guidance, counseling and testing services is maintained for students in all grades offered by the school district;

E. A learning resources program is maintained;

F. The physical facilities of each building are adequate and appropriate for the educational program offered;

G. There is adequate provision for the health and safety of all students within the custody of the school district;

H. A current policy statement pertaining to the administration and operation of the school district is available online or in each building’s administrative office including, but not limited to, policies governing the school building and classroom visitation rights of non-students;

I. The district is in compliance with the statutes which prohibit unequal treatment of individuals on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, honorably discharged veteran, sexual orientation, presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability or the use of a trained guide dog or service animal by a person with a disability and national origin in activities supported by common schools and which require equal access to Boy Scouts of America and other designated youth groups;

J. Within each school, the school principal has determined that appropriate student discipline is established and enforced. The school principal has conferred with the certificated employees in the school building in order to develop and/or review building disciplinary standards and the uniform enforcement of those standards;

K. Written high school graduation requirements and rules have been adopted by the school district board of directors; and

L. Equivalence among schools in teachers, administrators and auxiliary personnel and equivalence in the provision of curriculum materials and supplies among schools who receive Title 1 funds.

Cross References:
Board Policy 1310 Policy Adoption, Manuals and Administrative Procedures
2020 Curriculum Development and Adoption of Instructional Materials
2090 Program Evaluation
2104 Federal and/or State Funded Special Instructional Programs
2140 Guidance and Counseling
2410 High School Graduation Requirements
3200 Student Rights and Responsibilities
3210 Nondiscrimination
3231 Student Records
3410 Student Health
4000 Public Information Program
4040 Public Access to District Records
5240 Evaluation of Staff
6800 Operation and Maintenance of District Facilities

Adoption Date: 02/23/12
Raymond School District #116



2107‑COMPREHENSIVE EARLY LITERACY PLAN

The district recognizes that early literacy is fundamental to students’ development of listening, speaking, reading, writing and critical thinking skills. The district will develop and implement reading and early literacy services to kindergarten through fourth grade students based on student needs for additional support so that every student has the opportunity to build a strong foundation for academic success.

General requirements

The plan will include:

1. Use of annual screening assessments and other tools (e.g., Washington kindergarten inventory of developing skills, Washington state early learning and development guidelines for birth through third grade, the second grade reading assessment under RCW 28A.300.310, local assessments) to identify at-risk readers; and

2. Research-based family involvement and engagement strategies, including those that help families and guardians learn to assist student reading and early literacy skills at home.

In order to keep parents informed and engaged in their student’s reading progress, the district will require that report cards for students in kindergarten through fourth grade report the student’s progress toward reading skill acquisition and whether the student is reading at grade level.

If the student is not reading at grade level, the teacher and other appropriate school personnel will: 1) Advise the parent or guardian as to which interventions and/or strategies the district will use to help improve the student’s reading skills; and 2) Provide strategies for parents or guardians to use at home to assist their student in improving their reading skills.

Requirements specific to third grade students

Prior to the return of the results of the statewide student assessment in English language arts, teachers and parents of students in third grade who are reading below grade-level or who, based on formative or diagnostic assessment and other indicators are likely to score in the below basic level (level one in a four-level scoring system on the statewide student assessment) on the third grade statewide student assessment in English language arts will meet to discuss the student’s progress.

Teachers may use a regularly scheduled parent-teacher conference to satisfy this meeting requirement.

At the meeting, the teacher will inform the parents/guardians of:

  1. The requirements of this policy;
  2.  The intensive reading improvement strategies that will be available to their student before fourth grade; and
  3. The school district’s grade placement policy for the following year.

If a third-grade student scores below grade level on the third grade statewide student assessment in English language arts and no meeting took place prior to the return of the results as indicated above, the principal or designee will notify the student’s parents/guardians of:

  1. The fact that their student scored below basic;
  2. The requirements of this policy with regard to such a score;
  3. The intensive improvement strategy options available;
  4. The school district’s grade placement policy;
  5. Contact information for a school district employee who can respond to questions and provide additional information; and
  6.  A reasonable deadline for obtaining the parent’s consent regarding the student’s improvement strategies that will be implemented and the student’s grade placement.

The district must obtain parent/guardian consent regarding appropriate grade placement and the intensive improvement strategy to be implemented. For students to be placed in fourth grade, the strategies discussed must include one provided, supported or contracted by the school district that includes a summer program or other options developed to meet the needs of students to prepare for fourth grade. The strategy must be implemented in consultation with the parents/guardians.

If the district does not receive a response from a parent/guardian by the deadline or within a reasonable time thereafter, the principal or designee will make a decision on the student’s grade placement for the following year and the intensive improvement strategies that will be implemented during the following school year. If the principal and parent cannot agree on the appropriate grade placement and improvement strategies from the list of available options, the district will honor the parent’s request.

If a student does not have a score in English language arts on the third-grade statewide assessment but the district determines or is able to anticipate (using district or classroom-based formative or diagnostic assessments or another standardized assessment), that that student is below basic, the district will follow the same process for third grade students listed in this policy.

Students in the transitional bilingual instruction program are exempt from this process, unless the student has participated in the program for three school years and receives a score of below basic on the third-grade statewide student assessment in English language arts. Students with disabilities whose individualized education program (IEP) includes specially designed instruction in reading or English language arts are exempt from this process.

Intensive reading and literacy improvement strategies

The district will choose and implement intensive reading and literacy improvement strategies from a state menu of best practices established by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).

The district may use a practice or strategy not present on the state menu of best practices for two years initially.  If the district is able to demonstrate that it has achieved improved outcomes for students over the previous two school years at a level commensurate with best practices on the state menu, OSPI must approve use of the strategy for one additional school year.  Subsequent approval is dependent on continuing improvement.

Students with disabilities whose individualized education program (IEP) includes specially designed instruction in reading or English language arts will be provided reading and literacy improvement strategies as provided in the IEP.

In any school where more than forty percent of tested students received a score of basic (level two on a four-level scoring system) or below basic on the third-grade statewide student assessment in English language arts in the previous school year, the school district will implement an intensive reading and literacy improvement strategy from the state menu or an alternative strategy as referenced above for all students in grades kindergarten through four at the school.

Reporting requirement

The district will require each school to report the number of students in kindergarten through fourth grade who are reading below grade level and the interventions being provided to those students to improve their reading. The information will be disaggregated by subgroups of students. The district will aggregate the information and provide reports to the office of the superintendent of public instruction for delivery to the education committees of the legislature and the educational opportunity gap oversight and accountability committee.

Cross References:
2421 – Promotion/Retention

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.202 – Comprehensive system of instruction and services in reading and early literacy
RCW 28A.320.203 – Reading skills –report cards
RCW 28A.655.230 Reading skills — Meeting for grade placement and strategies for student improvement — Exemptions.
RCW 28A.655.235 Reading skills — Intensive reading and literacy improvement strategy — Calculation of tested students at or below basic on third grade student assessment — State menu of best practices.

Management Resources:
2015 – October Issue
OSPI’s Comprehensive Literacy Plan [DRAFT]

Adoption Date: 11/24/15
Raymond School District #116



 2108—REMEDIATION PROGRAMS

The district will implement a learning assistance program designed to enhance educational opportunities for students enrolled in kindergarten through twelfth grade who do not meet state English language arts or mathematics standards by providing supplemental instruction and services to those students.

Selection of Students

Students participating in the district’s learning assistance program will be limited to the following:

A. Students who score below standard for his or her grade level using multiple measures of performance, which may include the statewide student assessments or other assessments and performance measurement tools administered by the school or district;

B. Students who are in grades eleven or twelve and are not on track to meet state or local graduation requirements;

C. Students identified in eighth grade in need of high school transition services, which may continue up through the end of ninth grade; or

D. Students who are identified by the district as being significantly at-risk of not being successful in school and to be served under the district’s readiness to learn program.

Best Practices

The district will use best practices in providing learning assistance program services to participating students. The district will select practices and strategies in accordance with WAC 392-162-041.

Coordination with Other Programs

The district may coordinate federal, state, and local programs in order to serve the maximum number of students who are below grade level in basic skills. Students receiving assistance in another special needs program may also be served in the learning assistance program if they meet student eligibility and selection requirements.

Annual Report to OSPI

The district will submit an annual report to the superintendent of public instruction detailing the following:

A. The amount of academic growth gained by students participating in the learning assistance program;

B. The number of students who gain at least one year of academic growth;

C. The specific practices, activities, and programs used by each school building that received learning assistance funds; and

D. The number of students served by the learning assistance program during the school year who were able to exit the program because student academic growth resulted in meeting the academic standard for grade level.

Legal References: Chapter 28A.165 RCW Learning Assistance Program
WAC 392-162 Special Service Program – Learning Assistance

Cross References:
6100 – Revenues From Local, State and Federal Sources
4130 – Title I Parent and Family Engagement
2161 – Special Education and Related Services for Eligible Students
2104 – Federal and/or State Funded Special Instructional Programs

Adoption Date: 4/26/18
Raymond School District #116



2108P—REMEDIATION PROGRAMS

To receive services from federal remediation, learning assistance (LAP) or special education programs, a student must meet the qualifying criteria for that program:

A. Students with any handicapping condition may receive both special education and federal remediation services, if eligible for both services. A student may receive federal remediation services only in academic areas in which the student does not have a qualifying deficit for special education services.

B. Students whose special education is limited to services provided by a communication disorders specialist, physical therapist or occupational therapist may receive LAP services. Such students may receive any type of LAP services for which they are eligible.

C. A student may receive either federal remediation or LAP service in an academic area for which the student qualifies, but not both services. A student may receive federal remediation services in any one eligibility area and LAP services in another eligibility area.

D. A student eligible for special education may receive federal remediation or LAP services only if the student has the capacity to make substantial progress toward functioning at a level appropriate to the student’s chronological age without substantially modifying the level or intensity of the federal remediation or LAP instruction.

Program Alternatives

Special education, federal remediation and LAP services may be combined to benefit the special needs student:

A. Separate programs. The student may be served separately by more than one special needs program.

B. Cooperative programs. Staff members from special education, federal remediation and/or LAP programs may work together to serve more than one group of special needs students in a school. A special education teacher and a federal remediation instructional assistant may provide services for students who are eligible for special education and/or federal remediation services. Staff time and other expenditures should be documented separately for each program for financial purposes.

C. Unified program. One teacher certified to teach special education may provide services to all students in the school who are eligible for special education, federal remediation and LAP. The teacher may be assisted by a teacher aide or instructional assistant. The salary and non-salary costs may be prorated to special education, federal remediation and LAP budget accounts according to the proportion of services provided for students eligible for each of the types of service.



2110—TRANSITIONAL BILINGUAL INSTRUCTION

The board has the highest commitment toward ensuring an equal educational opportunity for every student. While English is the basic language of instruction in the district’s schools, the district shall provide a transitional bilingual program for children whose primary language is not English, and whose English skills are sufficiently deficient or absent to impair learning.

The district and its staff shall:

A. communicate, whenever feasible, with parents of students in the bilingual program in a language they can understand; and

B. provide inservice training for teachers, counselors, and other staff who are involved in the district’s transitional bilingual program, including alternative instructional programs, on appropriate instructional strategies for students of culturally different backgrounds and use of curriculum materials and program models.

For purposes of providing such services, the superintendent shall establish procedures for identifying eligible students, evaluating a student’s previous course work, and granting credit to a student for purposes of graduation.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.180.010/080 Transitional bilingual instructional Program
WAC 392-160 Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2110P—TRANSITIONAL BILINGUAL INSTRUCTION

The following procedures have been instituted for purposes of implementing a transitional bilingual instruction program.

In those cases in which the use of instruction in the student’s primary language is not feasible, transitional bilingual instruction may be limited to English as a second language designated to enable the student to achieve competency in English.

At the time of registration at a school, parents of students shall be asked to identify the principal language that is spoken in the home. Students from limited-English-speaking homes will be assessed by a staff member to determine the English proficiency level of the student. If the interview reveals that the student speaks little or no English, he/she will be declared eligible for the transitional bilingual instruction. When the student shows limited English-speaking skills, the school shall administer an approved English proficiency test (e.g., Language Assessment Scales). If the score on such test falls at “3” or below the student shall be eligible to receive transitional bilingual instruction.

Continued Eligibility

Each limited-English-speaking student shall be reassessed with a standardized reading and language arts test each year to determine if he/she is eligible to receive transitional bilingual instruction. Any student who scores above the 35th percentile will be exited from the program. No student shall continue to be entitled to a transitional bilingual or alternative instructional program after the student has received instruction in a transitional bilingual or alternative instructional program conducted within any one or more school districts for a period of three school years (i.e., 540 school days or portions thereof): Provided, That each such student who is unable to demonstrate an improvement in English language skills that is sufficient to overcome the student’s learning impairment (i.e., unable to score above the 35th percentile on an approved test) shall continue to be entitled to an approved bilingual instruction or alternative instructional program.

Evaluation of Previous Course Work

Limited-English-speaking students with academic records will be awarded credit based on the number of hours per week that the student attended class in accordance with the following guidelines:

A. Up to one foreign language credit (180 hours of instruction) may be awarded for classes taken in which English was studied as a foreign language. English credit will not be awarded for this study.

B. English credit may be awarded as follows for instruction students received in their native language:

1. Up to one credit may be awarded students whose test scores show they are able to participate in advanced level classes in the district’s transitional bilingual program and if their native language instruction included the study of composition and literary concepts.

2. Up to two credits may be awarded students whose test scores show they are able to participate in the district’s regular English program and if their records document a high level of composition skills and literary concept development in English and the primary language.

C. Credit for other course work will be awarded based on established district criteria Including number of hours of instruction per week, sequence of courses, course content and prerequisites. Credit for course work completed in other United States school districts will be awarded based on standards established for awarding credits to limited-English-speaking students.

D. When a student enters the school district without academic records from his/her native country, and it is determined that the student had attended high school, equivalent credits may be awarded by the high school principal on the recommendation of a transitional bilingual staff person. The principal, with the recommendation of the staff, will determine the subjects for which these credits may be received.

E. Students of limited English proficiency who enter grades 9, 10, or 11 may be awarded credits toward graduation from high school on the basis of course work successfully completed in foreign schools or on the basis of alternative learning experiences. (See 2410P.)

Credit for Course Work Completed in the District

Any student of limited English proficiency who requires training in English-as-a-Second-Language prior to successful participation in regular academic courses shall not be enrolled as a senior.

A. Students of limited English proficiency may earn a maximum of five credits in required English and Social Studies courses in the transitional bilingual program.

B. Students of limited English proficiency should be awarded grades for course work on the basis of standards English-speaking students are required to meet. An audit mark may be used, indicating progress by the student, but no credit awarded.

Non-credit Program

Limited-English-proficient students who enter the school district when they are 18 years of age and who have had less than 8 years of formal education will be enrolled in the transitional bilingual program. The district staff will make every attempt to provide these students with an adequate program of survival English, History, Mathematics and vocational counseling and training. Such students will not normally receive a diploma.



2121—SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAM

The board recognizes that the abuse of alcohol, and the use and abuse of controlled illegal, addictive, or harmful substances including marijuana (cannabis) and anabolic steroids is a societal problem and may represent an impairment to the normal development, well-being and academic performance of students. To ensure the safety, health and well-being of all students, the board is committed to the development of a program which emphasizes drug and alcohol abuse prevention, intervention, aftercare support and necessary corrective actions. The program will address the legal, social and health consequences of drug and alcohol use, and provide information about effective techniques for resisting peer pressure to use illicit drugs or alcohol. The program will be age-appropriate and developmentally based for all students in all grades.

The board recognizes the effects to the school, home and community resulting from the abuse of alcohol and the use and abuse of controlled illegal, addictive or harmful substances including anabolic steroids. While the primary obligation to seek assistance rests with the student and his/her parent(s)/guardian(s), school staff shall work with the home and community to develop and implement a comprehensive prevention and intervention program. The board of directors shall seek the support, cooperation and coordination of public and private agencies through formation of an advisory committee, including representatives from the instructional staff, students, parents, state and local law enforcement staff and the county coordinator of alcohol and drug treatment or a representative of a treatment provider.

The superintendent is directed to develop and implement procedures to assess the scope of the problem of the use of addictive substances such as alcohol, drugs and nicotine, and to reduce and/or eliminate the problems associated with the use of alcohol, drugs and nicotine.

Parents and interested community members are encouraged to visit the school and/or classroom to observe classroom activities and review instructional materials. At the conclusion of each year, the district will evaluate the effectiveness of the program.

Cross References:
Board Policy 3241 Classroom Management, Corrective Actions or Punishment
Board Policy 5203 Staff Assistance Program

Legal References:

RCW 28A.170.075 Substance Abuse Awareness program – Intent
RCW 28A.210.310 Prohibition on use of tobacco products on school property.
20 U.S.C. 7101 et seq. Safe and Drug-free Schools and Communities Act

Management Resources:
Policy & Legal News, February 2013 Policy Revisions

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116
Technical Fix: 03/06/13



2121P—SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAM

Actions taken by staff in dealing with student use of alcohol and the use and abuse of controlled illegal, addictive or harmful substances including anabolic steroids will have as their first concern the welfare of the student involved and the other students in the school. Although a helping relationship rather than an investigative and punitive approach will be emphasized, necessary and appropriate disciplinary action will be taken when laws or school regulations are violated. Law enforcement agencies will be called upon for investigative and consultative assistance where illegal drug or alcohol activity has occurred.

Prevention

The prevention program shall focus on classroom instruction, guidance services and the school climate.

Instruction

This dimension of the prevention program shall focus on:

A. The effects of addictive substances such as alcohol, drugs and nicotine upon the body.

B. Skill development related to self-esteem, goal-setting, decision-making, conflict management, problem-solving, refusal and communication.

Guidance Services

Staff shall meet with students, individually and in small groups, to supplement addictive substance prevention, instruction and skill development. Staff will also assist parents to maximize the prevention efforts of the school.

School Climate

A facilitative school environment can help students to achieve in a productive manner (academically, socially and emotionally). The school shall strive to be a place where:

A. Students, staff, and parents respect themselves and others.

B. Individuals can be trusted to do what they say they will do.

C. High morale is evident.

D. Each person feels that he/she has a voice in the decisions that affect him/her.

E. All feel that they are continuing to learn and grow.

F. All value diversity and accept it as an opportunity for growth and development.

G. All possess a “sense of belonging”.

H. All feel that they can make a difference to someone else.

To this end, the school will encourage the formation of “natural helper”, Core Team and any education and/or prevention promotions that increase the awareness of the effects of substance abuse. Student support groups shall assist students concerned about their own substance abuse, students living in families suffering from substance abuse, and students concerned about the substance abuse of someone else.

Intervention

The goal of the intervention program shall be to eliminate use of alcohol and the use and abuse of controlled, illegal, addictive or harmful substances including anabolic steroids abuse by students.

Ongoing in-service will be provided for faculty and staff. Important aspects of in-service training will include dimensions of the family illness and dynamics of the addiction process; enabling behaviors; intervention techniques; children in chemically dependent families; student experimentation, abuse and dependency; parental involvement and community resources; prevention issues and strategies; treatment and aftercare support; and implementation of the program into the classroom/building.

Staff roles for the intervention program are as follows:

A. Administrators, counselors, selected staff and nurse meet weekly for the purpose of identifying any student(s) who may be in need of assistance. Such staff shall be sensitive to identifying symptoms of substance abuse. Suspected student(s) shall be referred to the Core Team, consisting of staff members who have exhibited a strong interest in attending to the needs of such students and who have received specialized training in substance abuse dependency.

B. The Core Team will meet regularly to review referrals; confer with students and, if warranted, counselors, administrators and/or parents; collect data; make recommendations for services; and maintain a confidential system of record keeping. Parents will be involved before any action is taken.

C. Students returning to school from a community inpatient or outpatient treatment program will be given aftercare support by the Core Team. Such students will receive support from “natural helpers” so that they may develop a strong sense of bond with other students and the school. Primary aftercare responsibility for students returning from a community treatment program rests with the student, parent and community treatment program personnel. School staff, the student, parent(s) and community treatment personnel will work cooperatively to facilitate the aftercare plan.

Corrective Action

If a student appears at school or at a school-sponsored function demonstrating behavior which indicates that he/she may be under the influence of a addictive substances and/or admits to an administrator that he/she is under the influence of a addictive substances, the school will take the following action:

A. The parents will be notified to arrange for appropriate treatment.

B. If the student’s illegal use of addictive substances is confirmed, the school administration may request the assistance of a law enforcement official in investigating the source of the addictive substance.

C. Appropriate school disciplinary action will be taken.

If school authorities find a student in possession of addictive substances at school, the addictive substances will be confiscated and turned over to law enforcement officials for investigation and disposal. Appropriate school disciplinary action will be taken by a school administrator regardless of law enforcement action.

If a school administrator receives information concerning sales and use of addictive substances outside of school, the information will be reported to law enforcement officials for their investigation.



2125—SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION

The Raymond School District Board of Directors is authorized by law to determine whether sexual health education instruction will be offered in the district. The board has determined that such a program will be offered to students, consistent with state law.

Sexual health education instruction offered by the district shall be medically and scientifically accurate, age appropriate, appropriate for students regardless of gender, race, disability status, or sexual orientation and include information about abstinence and other methods of preventing unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Abstinence will not be taught to the exclusion of other instruction on contraceptives and disease prevention. The district’s sexual health education program shall be consistent with the 2005 Guidelines for Sexual Health Information and Disease Prevention developed by the Department of Health and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The superintendent will provide parents/guardians an opportunity to review the materials to be used and provide information on excluding their child from sexual health education instruction.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2020 Curriculum Development and Adoption of Instructional Materials
Board Policy 2126 AIDS Prevention Education

Legal References:
RCW 28A.300.475 Medically Accurate Sexual Health Education — Curricula —Participation excused — Parental review
RCW 28A.600.480(2) Reporting of harassment, intimidation, or bullying Retaliation prohibited
– Immunity
WAC 392-410-140 Sex Health Education — Definition — Optional course or subject matter
Excusal of students

Management Resources:
Policy News, February 2009 Healthy Youth Act
Policy News, August 2007 Sex Education Curriculum and Instruction

Adoption Date: 3/26/09
Raymond School District #116



2125P—SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION

All instruction and materials for the district’s sexual health education program, will meet the following criteria:

Medically and scientifically accurate;

Age appropriate;

Appropriate for students regardless of gender, race, disability status or sexual orientation;

Consistent with the 2005 Guidelines for Sexual Health and Disease Prevention;

Include instruction about abstinence; and

Include instruction about contraceptives and other methods of disease prevention.

Definitions:

The district’s program will provide sexual health education as defined by the Healthy Youth Act.

A. Sexual health education:

The Healthy Youth Act defines sexual health education as:

1. The physiological, psychological and sociological developmental processes experienced by an individual;

2. The development of intrapersonal and interpersonal skills to communicate respectfully and effectively to reduce health risks and choose healthy behaviors;

3. Health care and prevention resources;

4. The development of meaningful relationships and avoidance of exploitative relationships; and

5. Understanding of the influences of family, peers, community and the media throughout life on healthy sexual relationships.

B. Medically and scientifically accurate:

The Healthy Youth Act defines medically and scientifically accurate as information that is verified or supported by research in compliance with scientific methods, is published in peer review journals, where appropriate, and is recognized as accurate and objective by professional organizations and agencies with expertise in the field of sexual health including but not limited to, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

C. 2005 Guidelines for Sexual Health and Disease Prevention:

A publication by the DOH and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) that provides the fundamental framework for establishing a medically and scientifically accurate sexual health education program for students. A copy of the Guidelines for Sexual Health Information and Disease Prevention is located on the DOH and OSPI Web sites.

Adoption of a Sexual Health Education Program

School districts shall involve parents and school district community groups in the planning, development, evaluation and revision of any instruction in sexual health education offered as a part of the school program.

The district must ensure that all instructional materials are medically and scientifically accurate. The DOH is available to provide technical assistance in determining medical and scientific accuracy. When choosing curriculum the district staff may examine the list of materials reviewed for medical and scientific accuracy that are located on the DOH website at www.doh.wa.gov.

In determining curriculum, the district staff may review the OSPI’s list of commonly used sexual health education curricula that were reviewed for their alignment with the guidelines. Although the list is not exhaustive, the list is updated annually and is posted on the OSPI website at www.k12.wa.us. Staff may also apply the OSPI Sexual Health Education Alignment tool to curriculum under consideration as a resource in assessing the curriculum. Ultimately, the district’s sexual health education program will ensure that in the K-12 life of a child, the sexual health education program is consistent with the 2005 Guidelines for Sexual Health and Disease Prevention.

For technical assistance, staff may contact the Health and Sexuality Education Program supervisor at the OSPI.

Parental/Guardian Notification Process

One month prior to teaching a program in sexual health education, each school will provide written notice to parents of the planned instruction.

Parent/Guardian Material Review Process

One month prior to providing instruction in sexual health education, the district will notify parents that all instructional materials are available to parents/guardians for inspection. The materials will include written materials and electronically formatted materials. The opportunity for inspection will be provided at a time and place convenient for parent/guardian participation such as evenings or weekends.

Excluding Student from a Program/Opt-Out

A parent/guardian who wishes to have a student excused from planned instruction in sexual health education must file a written request with the board of directors or its designee, at least (insert here the number of days) days prior to the planned instruction. The district will make the appropriate opt-out form available. Excused students shall be provided with appropriate alternative educational opportunities. Sample notification and opt out letters are available from OSPI.

Raymond School District #116
Adoption Date: 3/26/09



2126—AIDS PREVENTION EDUCATION

The life-threatening dangers of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and its prevention shall be taught in the district. AIDS prevention education shall be limited to the discussion of the life-threatening dangers of the disease, its spread, and prevention. Students shall receive such education at least once each school year beginning no later than the fifth grade.

The AIDS prevention education program shall be developed in consultation with teachers, administrators, parents, and other community members including, but not limited to, persons from medical, public health, and mental health organizations and agencies. The curricula and materials used in the AIDS education program may be the model curricula and resources available through SPI or, if developed by the school district, be approved for medical accuracy by the office on AIDS. District-developed curricula shall be submitted to the office on AIDS accompanied by an affidavit of medical accuracy stating that the material in the district-developed curricula has been compared to the model curricula for medical accuracy and that in the opinion of the district the district-developed materials are medically accurate. Upon submission of the affidavit and curricula, the district may use these materials until the approval procedure to be conducted by the office of AIDS has been completed.

At least one month before teaching AIDS prevention education in any classroom the district will conduct, during convenient hours for the parents and guardians of students, at least one presentation concerning the curricula and materials that will be used for such education. The parents and guardians shall be notified of the presentation. The curricula and materials shall be available for inspection. No student may be required to participate in AIDS prevention education if the student’s parent or guardian, having attended one of the district presentations, objects in writing to participation.

The curriculum for AIDS prevention education shall be designed to teach students which behaviors place a person dangerously at risk of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and methods to avoid such risk including, at least:

  • the dangers of drug abuse, especially that involving the use of hypodermic needles: and
  • the dangers of sexual intercourse, with or without condoms.

The program of AIDS prevention education shall stress the life-threatening dangers of contracting AIDS and shall stress that abstinence from sexual activity is the only certain means for the prevention of the spread or contraction of the AIDS virus through sexual contact. The instruction shall also stress that condoms and other artificial means of birth control are not a certain means of preventing the spread of the AIDS virus; and, reliance on condoms puts an individual at risk for exposure to the disease.

Cross References:
Board Policy 3414 Infectious Diseases
Board Policy 2125 Health, Family Life and Sex Education

Legal References:
RCW 28A.230.070 AIDS Education in public schools

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2130—CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

As part of its mission the board is committed to the development of the fundamental principles of honesty, honor, industry and economy. To this end the school and its staff will practice and teach morality, altruism, diligence and a respect for human dignity. The educational philosophy and practices of the school shall go beyond knowledge of character and/or moral development; it shall also involve prizing what is good and doing what is good.

The superintendent shall convey clear expectations for teachers and administrators regarding their roles regarding character and/or moral development.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.230.020 Fundamentals in conduct

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2130P—CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

Moral and/or character development occurs both affectively and cognitively. For purposes of providing a focus for a school that strives to enhance character development, the following attributes of a morally mature person as defined by the ASCD Panel on Moral Education are offered as targets for a school that wishes to facilitate a program of character development:

The morally mature person habitually:

A. Respects human dignity, which includes

  1. showing regard for the worth and rights of all persons,
  2. avoiding deception and dishonesty,
  3. promoting human equality,
  4. respecting freedom of conscience,
  5. working with people of different views, and
  6. refraining from prejudiced actions.

B. Cares about the welfare of others, which includes

  1. recognizing interdependence among people,
  2. caring for one’s country,
  3. seeking social justice,
  4. taking pleasure in helping others, and
  5. working to help others reach moral maturity.

C. Integrates individual interests and social responsibilities, which includes

  1. becoming involved in community life,
  2. doing a fair share of community work,
  3. displaying self-regarding and other-regarding moral virtues— self- control, diligence, fairness, kindness, honesty, civility-every day life,
  4. fulfilling commitments, and
  5. developing self-esteem through relationships with others.

D. Demonstrates integrity, which includes

  1. practicing diligence,
  2. taking stands for moral principles,
  3. displaying moral courage,
  4. knowing when to compromise and when to confront, and
  5. accepting responsibility for one’s choices.

E. Reflects on moral choices, which includes

  1. recognizing the moral issues involved in a situation,
  2. applying moral principles when making moral judgments,
  3. thinking about the consequences of decisions, and
  4. seeking to be informed about important moral issues in society and the world.

F. Seeks peaceful resolution of conflict, which includes

  1. striving for the fair resolution of personal and social conflicts,
  2. avoiding physical and verbal aggression,
  3. listening carefully to others, and
  4. encouraging others to communicate.


2133—DIVERSITY-MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

The Board recognizes the cultural diversity of students, staff, parents and community members of our school district and acknowledges the educational importance of valuing the diversity of all people in our pluralistic society. Diversity includes but is not limited to: race, religion, gender, culture, age, physically challenged and all other perceived differences.

The Board recognizes that diversity-multicultural education is an interdisciplinary process to be integrated into the total school program rather than a single, one-time event or series of activities.

To this end the Board is committed and supportive of the following:

A. The inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all students and staff.

B. The right to and responsibility for an educational environment which extends equal rights to all without discrimination through its policies and practices.

C. Universal respect for and observance of these rights to ensure that all students are provided a school and classroom environment in which they are free to learn, encouraged to accept and respect themselves and to treat others with dignity and respect.

D. A staffing composition of administrators, teachers and all other personnel that is representative of the cultural diversity in the district. Membership in all school district committees shall also be representative of the cultural diversity in the district.

E. An education of superior quality for all students that includes greater appreciation of and respect for human individuality and cultural differences and similarities which contribute to our democratic nation as a whole, and more particularly the cultural contributions that make up our community.

F. Training in diversity-multicultural education issues for all board members, district staff, administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, volunteers and community members participating in school sponsored activities. The superintendent is directed to integrate the purposes and aims of diversity multicultural education into all aspects of the school program.

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2140—GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING

The Raymond Board of Directors recognizes that guidance and counseling is an important part of the district’s total program of instruction and is integral in achieving the district’s mission of academic excellence and success for all students. The district will provide counseling and guidance services in accordance with state laws and regulations, school improvement plans, ethical standards, and district policies and procedures.

The board believes school counselors serve a vital role in maximizing student achievement and supporting a safe, compassionate learning environment. In the Raymond School District, the purpose and role of the school counselor is to plan, organize, and deliver a comprehensive school guidance and counseling program that personalizes education and supports, promotes, and enhances the academic, personal, social, and career development of all students, based on the national standards for school counseling programs of the American School Counselor Association.

It is the goal of the Raymond Board of Directors that the district’s comprehensive school guidance and counseling program will assist every student in acquiring the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to become an effective student, responsible citizen, productive worker and a lifelong learner. To that end, the district will develop and use materials, orientation programs and counseling techniques that encourage participation in all school programs and courses of study, including career and vocational technical programs and employment opportunities, based on factors other than sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, honorably discharged veteran or military status, sexual orientation, gender expression or identity, the presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal.

The district will not deny any student the ability to participate in or benefit from its any of its course offerings based on any of the categories listed in this policy, whether they take place on or off school grounds or are offered as part of the district’s online or alternative learning programs;

Annually, the district will review student enrollment data within courses and programs disaggregated by sex, race, limited-English proficiency and disability, including students protected under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. In reviewing the data, the district will determine whether a substantially disproportionate number of students within these categories are enrolled in a particular course or program. If disproportionality is found, the district will take prompt action to ensure that it is not the result of discrimination in 1) the identification and selection of students; 2) course and program enrollment criteria; 3) tests and appraisal instruments; 4) academic, career and vocational guidance materials; 5) work-study programs and opportunities; 6) educational scheduling or placement by counselors; or 7) other factors related to course or program enrollment.

The board will provide resources to support the foundation, content, and continuous improvement of a comprehensive K-12 school-counseling program, consistent with best practices described in state and national models. All school counseling programs will include the following elements: guidance curriculum, individual student planning, responsive services, and systems support for the counseling program. The superintendent or a designee will develop procedures to implement this policy.

Cross References:
2170 – Career and Technical Education
3210 – Nondiscrimination
3123 – Withdrawal Prior To Graduation

Legal References:
RCW 28A.410.043 School counselor certification
WAC 392-190-010 Counseling and guidance services – Course and program enrollment

Management Resources:
2014 – December issue
Policy News, December 2008
Guidance and Counseling Programs 2008 – December issue

Adoption Date: 2/26/15
Raymond School District #116



2140P—GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING

Suicide Awareness and Prevention:

Staff members shall be made aware of their responsibilities in the event of a potential or imminent suicide incident. Staff are expected to follow the procedures as specified. Three steps are vital in a suicide prevention program:

A. ensuring the short-term physical safety of the student;

B. communicating with appropriate school personnel, parents/guardians and local support personnel and establishing an interim plan of action; and,

C. referring to appropriate professional or agency and implementing a long-term plan of action.

The following procedures are intended to serve these purposes.

Potential Suicide — No Physical Evidence

Any staff member who received or discovers information about a potential suicide (notes, threats, conversations, etc.) will immediately notify the principal.

Suicidal Ideation (Verbal threat or communication of possible suicidal intent–Having thoughts of killing oneself).

A. Any suggestion, demonstration, or communication of an intention to commit suicide must be taken seriously.

B. Such behavior shall be reported to the principal, school psychologist, and to the impact team, who will act as an intervention team. The situation will be evaluated by this team through contacts with the student, parents, and other staff.

C. The superintendent, with the school psychologist, school nurse, and principal, shall be apprised of the situation and of the plan for monitoring the student’s behavior.

D. Confidentiality is not applicable when the student threatens himself (or others). In such circumstances no matter what guarantees of privacy have been given the student, the information must be discussed with the appropriate staff. Parents or guardians shall be notified. Referral to an outside agency or private professional shall be made in cooperation with the parents. If it is determined that the student is seriously in need of professional intervention, and the parent refuses to cooperate, appropriate agencies shall be contacted by the school administration to intervene on the student’s behalf.

E. The school administration shall monitor the student’s functioning in school until a positive adjustment is evident.

Physical Evidence of Attempted Suicide

Any staff member, who discovers or is informed of physical evidence relating to an attempted suicide (drug overdose, self-mutilation, etc.), will take the student to the nurse’s office; inform the nurse, leave the student in care of the nurse; and, immediately inform the principal.

Actual Attempt of Suicide

The following actions shall be taken:

A. Contact the medics if there is any question that a life-threatening situation is involved.

B. Assign a staff member to remain with the person at all times.

C. Clear the area to minimize chaos and misunderstanding and to provide working room.

D. Contact the parent or guardian and advise them of the situation and what actions are being taken.

E. Notify the superintendent.

F. Accompany the student to the hospital, if such action is necessary.

G. Notify appropriate staff members for consultation during the crisis. Following the crisis staff will:

1. Contact the parents for follow-up

2. Contact other professionals involved in the case for educational planning and follow-up services

H. Readmit the student upon the recommendation of the student’s medical advisor. Homebound instruction may be used on an interim basis.

Actual Suicide:

In the event of an actual suicide, the school must exercise care to avoid contagion and to help deal with the grieving, guilt and shock of students and staff. The superintendent shall be contacted immediately. The police department also must be notified.

The superintendent’s office will respond to all requests for information. Follow up actions to be taken are as follows:

A. Prior to the next school day, the principal will assemble the faculty and provide accurate information and plans for the day.

B. The superintendent, principal and psychologist or other relevant staff will need to determine steps to take to deal with the current school situation and plan deal with problems which may arise.

C. Students will meet in order to receive all the facts.

1. They should be encouraged to discuss their shock, feelings of loss, good and bad memories of the person, and to participate in discussion of depression, death, and suicide.

2. Particular attention should be directed to students who had a close relationship to the victim.

Adoption Date: 3/28/00
Raymond School District #116



2145‑Suicide Prevention

The Board of Directors recognizes that suicide is a leading cause of death among youth and that suicidal indicators such as substance abuse and violence are complex issues that should be taken seriously.  While district staff may recognize potentially suicidal youth and the district can make an initial risk assessment, the district cannot provide in-depth mental health counseling.  Instead, the board directs district staff to refer students who exhibit suicidal behaviors to an appropriate service for further assessment and counseling.

District staff who have knowledge of a suicide threat must take the proper steps to support the student and to report this information to the building principal or designee who will, in turn, notify the appropriate school officials, the student’s family and appropriate resource services.

The board also recognizes the need for youth suicide prevention procedures.  The district will adopt and, at the beginning of each school year, provide to all district staff, including substitute and regular bus drivers, a plan for recognizing, screening, referring and responding to students in emotional or behavioral distress.  At a minimum, the plan will:

1. Identify training opportunities for staff on recognizing, screening and referral of students in emotional or behavioral distress, including those who exhibit indicators of substance or sexual abuse, violence or suicide;

2. Describe how to utilize the expertise of district staff trained in recognition, screening and referral;

3. Provide guidelines, based on staff expertise, for responding to suspicions, concerns or warning signs of emotional or behavioral distress;

4. Address development of partnerships with community organizations and agencies for referral of students to support services, to include development of at least one memorandum of understanding between the district and one such entity;

5. Contain procedures for communication with parents and guardians, including notification requirements in accordance with RCW 28A.320.160;

6. Describe how staff should respond to a crisis situation where a student is in imminent danger to himself or herself or others;

7. Describe how the district will provide support to students and staff after an incident of violence, student suicide or allegations of sexual abuse of a student;

8. Describe how staff should respond when allegations of sexual contact or abuse are made against a staff member, volunteer, parent, guardian or family member of the student, including how staff should interact with parents, law enforcement and child protective services;

9. Describe how the district will provide certificated and classified staff training on the obligation to report physical abuse or sexual misconduct required under RCW 28A.400.317.

The superintendent will develop and implement the plan and a staff training schedule to achieve the board’s goals and objectives.

Cross References:
3207 – Prohibition of Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying
2140 – Guidance and Counseling

Legal References:
RCW 28A.410.226 Washington professional educator standards board — Training program on youth suicide screening — Certificates for school nurses, social workers, psychologists, and counselors — Adoption of standards.
RCW 28A.410.043 School Counselor Certification
RCW 28A.320.1271 Model school district plan for recognition, initial screening, and response to emotional or behavioral distress in students.
RCW 28A.320.127 Plan for recognition, screening, and response to emotional or behavioral distress in students.

Management Resources:
2016 – July Issue
2014 – December Issue
2011 – April Issue

Adoption Date: 10/27/2016
Raymond School District #116


2145P—PROCEDURE SUICIDE PREVENTION

Prevention
 Suicide prevention strategies may include, but are not be limited to, efforts to promote a positive school climate that enhances students’ feelings of connectedness with the school and each other, and is characterized by caring staff and harmonious interrelationships among students.

Student Health Education Program
 The district’s comprehensive health education program will promote the healthy mental, emotional, and social development of students including, but not limited to, the development of problem-solving skills, coping skills and self-esteem. Developmentally appropriate suicide prevention instruction will be incorporated into the health education curriculum and designed to help students:

a. identify and analyze signs of depression and self-destructive behaviors and understand how feelings of depression, loss, isolation, inadequacy and anxiety can lead to thoughts of suicide;
b. Identify alternatives to suicide and develop coping and resiliency skills;
c. Learn to listen, share feelings and get help when communicating with friends who show signs of suicidal intent; and
d. Identify trusted adults, school resources, and/or community crisis intervention resources where youth can get help and recognize that there is no stigma associated with seeking mental health, substance abuse and/or suicide prevention services.

Student Responsibility The district will encourage students to notify a teacher, principal, counselor or other adult when they are experiencing depression or thoughts of suicide or when they suspect or have knowledge of another student’s despair or suicidal intentions. Where appropriate, the district will use students to help educate their peers to identify the warning signs of suicidal behavior and to get a suicidal student adult help.

Staff Training
 The district’s suicide prevention training will help staff identify and respond to students at risk of suicide. The training will be offered under the direction of a district counselor/ psychologist and/or in cooperation with one or more community mental health or public health agencies and may include information on:

a. Identifying risk factors such as previous suicide attempts, history of depression or mental illness, substance use problems, bullying and harassment, family history of suicide or violence, feelings of isolation, interpersonal conflicts, a recent severe stressor or loss, family instability and other factors;
b. Warning signs that may indicate suicidal intentions, including changes in students’ appearance, personality or behavior;
c. School and community resources/services; and
d. District procedures for intervening when a student attempts, threatens, discloses the desire to commit suicide or displays other indicators.

Principal/Designee Prevention Planning School administrative teams will designate specific individuals to be promptly contacted regarding a suicide threat including the school counselor, psychologist, nurse, superintendent, the student’s parent/guardian and, as necessary, local law enforcement or mental health agencies. The principal or counselor will develop a reentry plan, including a student/staff support plan for use after a suicide attempt.

Intervention Whenever a staff member suspects or has knowledge of a student’s suicidal intentions he/she will take proper steps to support the student, promptly notify the principal or school counselor and request that appropriate school staff conduct an initial risk interview.

The principal or counselor will then notify the student’s parents/guardians as soon as possible, unless notification of the parents will jeopardize the student’s safety. The district may also refer the student to mental health resources in the community.

Additionally, the principal or designee will ensure the student’s physical safety by one of the following as appropriate:

a. Secure immediate medical treatment if a suicide attempt has occurred;
b. Secure emergency assistance if a suicidal act is being actively threatened;
c. Keep the student under continuous adult supervision until the parent/guardian and/or appropriate support agent or agency can be contacted and has the opportunity to intervene;
d. Document the incident and disposition in writing as soon as feasible;
e. Follow-up with the parent/guardian and student, in a timely manner, to provide referrals to appropriate services as needed;
f. Provide access to counselors or other appropriate personnel to listen to and support students and staff who are directly or indirectly involved with the incident; or
g. Provide an opportunity for all who respond to the incident to debrief, evaluate the effectiveness of the strategies used and make recommendations for future actions.

Parent Responsibility If a student is determined to be at risk, the principal or designee will contact the parent/guardian and:

a. Ask the parent/guardian whether he or she is aware of the student’s mental state;
b. Ask the parent/guardian how he/she will obtain mental counseling or appropriate support for the student;
c. Provide names of community counseling resources, if appropriate, and offer to facilitate the referral;
d. Determine the parent’s/guardian’s intent to seek appropriate services for the student; and
e. Discuss the student’s reentry into school.

Post–Event In the event that a suicide occurs or is attempted, the principal or designee will follow the crisis intervention procedures contained in the school safety plan. After consultation with the Superintendent or designee and the student’s parents/guardians about facts that may be divulged in accordance with the laws governing confidentiality of student record information, the principal or designee may provide students, parents/guardians, and staff with information, counseling and/or referrals to community agencies as needed. School administrators may receive assistance from school counselors or other mental health professionals in determining how best to discuss the suicide or attempted suicide with students and staff. Following a suicide, the district will also assess the impact within all schools and the local community and provide appropriate information and support.

Communications
 The district’s suicide prevention policy and procedure and the crisis intervention plan will be available for all staff, students and community through the student, staff, volunteer and parent/guardian handbooks and in school and district offices.

All requests for specific information regarding an incident will be directed to the building principal or designee.

Resources The district will utilize school counselors, the crisis telephone hotline, physician/health care providers, mental health specialists, coaches and youth leaders, parents and clergy as resources for prevention and intervention. The district will also develop partnerships with community organizations and agencies and a memorandum of understanding with at least one of these programs for referral of students to support services. Community resources include:

Prevention Resources:

Washington Youth Suicide Prevention Program, www.yspp.org, 206-297-5922;

Washington State Department of Health, www.doh.wa.gov/preventsuicide; 360-236-2800;

ESD prevention/intervention

Crisis Response Resources:

Emergency Response: 911

National LifeLine: 1-800-273 and Talk (8255)



2150—CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAM

The board recognizes that the goals and objectives of the district can best be achieved by providing a broad offering of purposeful learning experiences, some of which are more appropriately conducted outside of the approved curriculum of the district. Such activities will ordinarily be conducted wholly or partly outside the regular school day and will be available to all students who voluntarily elect to participate. The co-curricular program encompasses approved curriculum-related activities.

The board will approve all activities included within the Associated Student Body (ASB) program. The principal is authorized to approve curriculum-related activities that are not part of the ASB program and will make school facilities available for them and designate staff members to support and supervise them.

The district will not exclude any person from participation in the co-curricular program, deny any person the benefits of such a program or otherwise discriminate against any person in any co-curricular program on the basis of the categories identified in the district’s Nondiscrimination policy.

The criteria to be used by the principal for approving curriculum-related activities are:

A. The purposes and/or objectives will be part of a specific program or course offering;
B. The participating students will be currently enrolled in a related course or program or possess the entry level knowledge and/or skills to successfully participate in the activity;
C. The group will be supervised by a qualified staff member;
D. The cost of the activity must not be prohibitive to student or district;
E. The activity must comply with Title IX requirements;
F. All activity must take place on school premises unless approved in advance by the school principal; and
G. The activity must not be secretive in nature.

Curriculum related activities, whether approved by the board as part of the ASB or by the principal, must meet at least one of the following criteria:

A. The subject matter of the activity is actually taught or will soon be taught in a regularly offered course;
B. The subject matter of the activity concerns the body of courses as a whole;
C. Participation in the activity is required for a particular course; or
D. Participation in the activity results in academic credit.
E. The board directs the superintendent to develop appropriate procedures for proper planning, funding, approval and implementation of all activities offered within the above guidelines.

The principal will be responsible for administering the co-curricular program in the school. An opportunity will be made available in each school for students, including those with disabilities, to participate in some aspect of the program. A survey will be conducted at least once every three (3) years to assure that the recreational and athletic activities program accurately responds to the needs and desires of both male and female students.

The district will evaluate its intramural and interscholastic program at least once each year to ensure that equal opportunities are available to members of both sexes with respect to participation in interscholastic and/or intramural programs.

Cross References:
2151 – Interscholastic Activities
3210 – Nondiscrimination
3510 – Associated Student Bodies
4260 – Use of School Facilities

Legal References:
20 U.S.C. 4071 et seq. Equal Access Act
RCW 28A.325.020 Associated student bodies — Powers and responsibilities affecting
RCW 28A.600.200 Interschool athletic and other extracurricular activities for students — Authority to regulate and impose penalties — Delegation of authority — Conditions
RCW 28A.640.020 Regulations, guidelines to eliminate discrimination — Scope — Sexual harassment policies
WAC 392-138-010 Definitions
WAC 392-190-025 Recreational and athletic activities
WAC 392-190-030 General — Recreational and athletic activities — Annual athletic evaluationSex discrimination — Equal opportunity factors considered
WAC 392-190-040 Recreational and athletic activities — eSex discrimination — Student athletic interest survey — Required survey instrument
WAC 392-190-045 Recreational and athletic activities – Facilities.

Adoption Date: 2/26/15
Raymond School District #116



2150P—CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAM

The co-curricular program as defined consists of:

A. activities that are curriculum-related and have been approved as part of the associated student body program; and
B. curriculum-related activities that are not part of the associated student body program and which satisfy the conditions and criteria established in policy #2150.

Activities which operate as an approved associated student body program must have met all conditions as specified in the ASB Constitution, and must be curriculum related. The school principal shall be responsible for assigning a staff member(s) to supervise all such approved programs.

When an activity does not satisfy the ASB program conditions or ASB status would not be necessary or beneficial, interested students and a proposed staff member-sponsor may seek approval and recognition as a curriculum-related activity from the school principal. Each approved group shall operate under the guidelines set forth by the principal, including, but not limited to, objectives, membership, supervision, proposed activities, and funding.

In order to be curriculum related an activity must meet at least one of the following criteria:

A. The subject matter of the activity is actually taught or will soon be taught in a regularly offered course;
B. The subject matter of the activity concerns the body of courses as a whole;
C. Participation in the activity is requiring for a particular course; or
D. Participation in the activity results in academic credit

Recognized curriculum-related groups shall have use of school facilities and equipment under terms set forth by the school principal. Groups that are not recognized as a part of the co-curricular program may apply for use of school facilities under conditions set forth in Policy 4330, Use of School Facilities.

Students participating in school-approved activities will not be allowed to participate in community sponsored events where alcohol is being served to those adults attending the event, unless there is proper supervision by approved advisors and limited accessibility to alcohol by students. Such supervision and accessibility must be approved in advance by school administrators.

Adoption Date: 7/25/00
Raymond School District #116



2151—INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITIES

The board recognizes the value of a program of interscholastic activities as an integral part of the total school experience to all students of the district and to the community. The program of interscholastic activities will include all activities relating to competitive sport contests, games or events, or exhibitions involving individual students or teams of students of this district when such events occur between separate schools within this district or with any schools outside this district.

The board expects that:

A. All interscholastic activities and events will be in compliance with the rules and regulations of the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA). The schools of the district will not participate in any out-of-season athletics that are not sanctioned by the WIAA. The district will not be responsible or liable for nonschool-sponsored programs or for programs that are organized, promoted or participated in by staff members without school approval. The district will not be responsible for or control and incur liability for summer and/or out-of-season activities unless specifically sponsored by the school district. The superintendent will establish rules defining the circumstances under which school facilities may be used and under which announcements of summer sports leagues and/or clinics may be channeled to students.

A. An athletic coach must be properly trained and qualified for an assignment as described in the coach’s job description.

B. A syllabus that outlines the skills, techniques and safety measures associated with a coaching assignment will be distributed to each coach. A coach must secure permission in advance if he/she wishes to deviate from the syllabus.

C. Coaching stipends and all gifts to a coach that exceed five hundred dollars ($500.00) in a season will be approved by the board of directors.

D. In-service training opportunities will be afforded each coach so that he/she is trained to attend to the health care needs of participants. Prior to a sports season, the coach will prepare a plan for handling medical emergencies at practice sessions and games (home and away).

E. Participants will be issued equipment that has been properly maintained and fitted.

F. All facilities and equipment utilized in the interscholastic activity program, whether or not the property of the district, will be inspected on a regular basis.

G. Nonprescribed medications, including such items as analgesic balms, vitamins and salt tablets, must be approved by the superintendent before they may be available for use by coaches and/or athletic trainers. After athletic training medications have been approved, the coach and/or trainer must secure authorization from the parent and the student’s doctor before the medications may be used during the athletic season. If such release is not on file, the nonprescribed medications may not be used. This provision does not preclude the coach and/or trainer from using approved first aid items. A sign will be posted that warns students that eligibility to participate may be denied if anabolic steroids are used for the purpose of enhancing athletic ability.

1. The board recognizes that certain risks are associated with participation in interscholastic sports. While the district will strive to prevent injuries and accidents to students, each participant and his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to sign a statement which indicates that the parent(s) and the student acknowledge the risks of injuries resulting from such participation and give assurance that the student will follow the instructions of the coach.

2. Each participant will be required to furnish evidence of physical fitness prior to becoming a member of an interscholastic team. A written report will be completed when a student is injured while participating in a school-supervised activity. A participant will be free of injury and will have fully recovered from illness before participating in any activity.

3. Each student participating in interscholastic athletic activities is required to have or obtain medical insurance for expenses incurred as a result of injuries sustained while participating in the extracurricular activity. Students will provide evidence of coverage with a minimum limit of (insert amount) in medical expenses or will obtain such coverage through the insurance plan offered to all students participating in activities in the district. No student will be denied the ability to participate solely because the student’s family, by reason of low income, is unable to pay the entire amount of the premium for such insurance. The superintendent or his or her designee may approve partial or full waiver of premiums to permit all students to obtain the required medical insurance.

The superintendent will annually prepare, approve and present to the board for its consideration a program of interscholastic activities for the school year. The superintendent will prepare rules for the conduct of student activities including, but not limited to, use of alcoholic beverages; use of tobacco; use or possession of illegal chemical substances (including marijuana/cannabis) or opiates not prescribed by a physician; physical appearance; curfew; unsportsmanlike conduct; absence from practice; gambling; or any infraction of civil law. Notice of rules and disciplinary actions related to rule violations will be distributed to each participant and his/her parents prior to the beginning of an interscholastic activity season.

The district will evaluate its intramural and interscholastic program at least once each year to ensure that equal opportunities are available to members of both sexes with respect to participation in interscholastic and/or intramural programs.

Nondiscrimination

The district will not exclude any person from participation in the interscholastic program, deny any person the benefits of such a program or otherwise discriminate against any person in any interscholastic program on the basis of the categories identified in the district’s Nondiscrimination policy.

The district will provide necessary funds for recreational and athletic activities for both sexes, although the aggregate expenditures are not required to be equal for members of each sex and expenditures for separate male and female teams are not required to be equal.

When individual students with disabilities are unable to participate in existing activities even when offered reasonable modifications and necessary accommodations, aids or services, the district may offer opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in separate or different recreational or athletic activities.

The district may operate or sponsor separate teams for members of each sex where selection for such teams is based upon competitive skill or the activity involved is a contact sport. However, when the district operates or sponsors a team in a particular sport for members of one sex but not the other, and athletic opportunities for members of the other sex have previously been limited, members of the excluded sex will be allowed to try out for the team offered. unless the sport offered is a contact sport. For the purposes of this policy, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball and other sports in which the major activity involves bodily contact.

The district will provide equal athletic opportunities for both sexes within each school for interscholastic, club or intramural athletics. In determining whether equal athletic opportunities for both sexes are being provided, the district will consider the following factors:

a. Whether the selection of sports and levels of competition effectively accommodate the interests and abilities of members of both sexes;
b. Provision of equipment and supplies;
c. Scheduling of games and practice time, including the use of playfields, courts, gyms and pools;
d. Travel and per diem allowances, if any;
e. Opportunity to receive coaching and academic tutoring;
f. Assignment and compensation of coaches, tutors, and game officials;
g. Provision of locker rooms and practice and competitive facilities;
h. Provision of medical and training facilities and services, including the availability of insurance;
i. Provision of housing and dining facilities and services, if any; and
j. Publicity and awards.

Annual athletic evaluation

The district will evaluate its intramural and interscholastic program in each school at least once each year to ensure that equal opportunities are available to members of both sexes with respect to participation in interscholastic and/or intramural programs. The evaluation will include consideration for the factors listed in the above paragraph, Nondiscrimination.

Student athletic interest survey

Every three years, the district will administer to each school that operates interscholastic, intramural and other athletics the survey developed by the office of the superintendent of public instruction to determine male and female student interest in participation in specific sports. The district will consider the survey results when planning and developing recreational and athletic activities offered by the district and when determining whether equal opportunities are available to members of both sexes.

Facilities

The district will provide separate facilities (e.g., showers, toilets, training rooms) for male and female students or schedule the facilities equitably for separate use.

Cross References:

WIAA Handbook
2121 – Substance Abuse Program
3210 – Nondiscrimination
3413 – Student Immunization And Life Threatening Health Conditions
3414 – Infectious Diseases
3416P – Procedure Medication at School
3418 – Emergency Treatment Response to Student Injury or Illness
4260 – Use of School Facilities
6512 – Infection Control Program

Legal References:
RCW 28A.400.350 Liability, life, health, health care, accident, disability, and salary insurance authorized — Health savings accounts — Premiums — Noncompliance
RCW 28A.600.200 Interschool athletic and other extracurricular activities for students — Authority to regulate and impose penalties — Delegation of authority — Conditions
RCW 69.41.330 Public Warnings — School districts
RCW 69.41.340 Student athletics — Violations — Penalty
WAC 392-190-025 Recreational and athletic activities

Management Resources:
2014 – December Issue
2013 – April Issue
2007 – October Issue Policy News, October 2007 Elimination of Outdated and Obsolete Policies
WIAA Handbook

Adoption Date: 2/26/15
Raymond School District #116



2151P—INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS

Coach’s Duties

In accordance with district policy and the coach’s job description, the coach has the duty to:

A. Instruct Participants

The coach should employ the latest methods and proper instruction when working with students to develop motor skills. If an injury occurs while using an improper instructional method, the district and its employees may be liable for negligence.

B. Warn Participants

The coach should inform all athletes and their parents of the inherent risks involved in participation in the particular sport, including the very small risk of infection with a blood-borne pathogen. The coach must describe, using a variety of methods, the catastrophic and common non-catastrophic injuries unique to the sport.

C. Supervise Participants

The coach will create a daily plan, showing how the coach plans to conduct general supervision of the sport, and how he/she will supervise specific drills and other components of the daily practice. Adequacy of supervision should be reviewed in terms of quality and quantity and should include factors such as: the age of the students, the size of the students, the equipment involved, the maturity level of the students, the first aid equipment and training available, the appropriate certification of supervisors where required, and the safety training of the personnel involved.

D. Provide Safe Equipment and Facilities

Equipment should be properly fitted and maintained. Athletes should be instructed on how to conduct a daily inspection. Facilities should be free of hazards and inspected regularly.

E. Maintain Records of Injuries

A report should be completed for each accident. Injury reports should be maintained for a period of five years after the student’s 21st birthday.

F. Assess Fitness of Participants

The coach will assess the physical fitness, the medical condition, and the skill level of athletes prior to participation in sporting activities.

G. Provide Equal Protection and Due Process

While participation in co-curricular activities is a privilege, a student whose participation will be terminated based on an alleged violation of the conduct code must be afforded the opportunity of a fair hearing.

H. Transport Athletes Safely

A coach has a duty to see that athletes are safely transported to and from contests and to and from practices if practices are held at sites other than the immediate school grounds.

I. Group Participants

The coach has the duty to employ a recognized system of grouping for participants in a particular sport that will avoid unequal and unsafe participation. The system of grouping will be based upon skill level, age, maturity, sex, size and experience.

J. Foresee Danger

A coach should be able to reasonably anticipate foreseeable dangers that may occur, and take precautions protecting the children in his/her custody from such dangers.

K. Protect From Loss

A participant is required to present evidence that he/she is covered by an accident policy. A blanket catastrophic (“no fault”) insurance provides coverage for serious injuries.

The duties listed above are not meant to be comprehensive. In carrying out the duties of the assignment, a staff member is expected to act as a reasonable professional would act under similar circumstances. A staff member who supervises a sports activity is expected to know the intricacies of the activity that he/she is leading.

Summer Sports Activities/Clinics

Rules governing out-of-school and/or out-of-season student sports participation are as follows:

A. A practice is defined as the teaching phase of a sport to any present, past or future squad member while as the student is in grade 7-12. Practices can take place during the school year or during the summer. The school may not sponsor, promote or direct activities which resemble out-of-season practices or contests during the school year or summer.

A school staff member who sponsors, promotes or directs such activities during the summer vacation will clearly indicate that he/she is operating independent of the school district. As such, the school district will be free of liability associated with the activity.

B. Students will be advised that participation in a commercial summer camp or clinic or other similar type of activity will not begin until the conclusion of the final WIAA state tournament of the school year. Participants in a fall school sports program may not attend any summer camp/clinic in that sport after August 1 until the first fall sports turnout. The school should announce by school bulletin that summer sports camp/clinic is neither endorsed nor sponsored by the district.

C. A coach (contracted or volunteer) may not sponsor, promote, coach or direct activities which resemble out-of-season practices or contests in the sport they coach to any of their squad members or future squad members (grades 7-12) until after the school year’s final WIAA state tournament.

D. The use of the school bulletin board, public address system or school newspaper for promotional purposes to announce sports clinics/camps will fall within the same guidelines as applied to other commercial endeavors.

E. School facilities to be used for summer activity and/or sports camps may be rented consistent with the rates, rules and regulations applicable for other commercial uses.

A user will hold the district free and without harm from any loss or damage, liability or expense that may arise during or be caused in any way such use of school facilities. Authorization for use of school facilities will not be considered as endorsement of or approval of the activity group or organization, or the purposes it represents.

Athletic Code

The opportunity to participate in the interscholastic athletic program is a privilege granted to all students of the district. Participants in this voluntary program are expected to conform to specific conduct standards established by the principals and athletic coaches.

A student who is found by a certificated staff member of the student’s school to be in violation of any rules is subject to removal from the team. A student who has allegedly violated one or more of the conduct rules may appeal a disciplinary action as specified in this code.

The following rules will be applicable for a sports season:

A. Use and/or Possession of Alcoholic Beverages, Tobacco

An athlete who is found to be in possession of alcohol or tobacco products may be removed from the athletic team for three weeks (first offense). If the student violates the rule twice during the sports season, he/she will be dropped from the team for the season.

B. Use and/or Possession of Illegal Chemical Substances or Opiates

An athlete who is found to be in possession of illegal chemical substances (including marijuana/cannabis) or opiates will be removed from the team for the balance of the sports season.

C. Physical Appearance

An athlete will maintain the dress and grooming standards of the team. The first offense will result in a verbal warning. Repeated offenses will result in removal from the activity for five (5) school days.

D. Curfew

An athlete will be at his/her home by 10:00 p.m. each night of the sports season unless detained by a school activity. The first offense will result in a verbal warning. Repeated offenses will result in removal from the activity for five (5) school days.

E. Unsportsmanlike Conduct

An athlete will exhibit appropriate conduct in practices and/or contests.

The first offense will result in a verbal warning. Repeated offenses will result in removal from the activity for five (5) school days.

F. Attendance at School

An athlete will attend school for at least one-half day on the day of an athletic contest. If an athlete receives an unexcused absence for any portion of the day, the athlete will be ineligible to participate in the activity/contest on that day. If excused, the athlete may participate if he/she was in attendance for one half day or more.

G. Absence from Practice

An athlete is expected to be in attendance at all team practices unless excused for illness or by prior approval. If an athelete is absent from practice and not excused, the athlete will be ineligible to participate in the next contest.

H. Violation of Law on School Grounds

When a student is found guilty of an offense committed while on school grounds or at a school activity, the corrective action will depend upon the nature of the violation.

I. Repeated Offenses

If a student repeatedly violates one of the above rules, he/she may be removed from the team for the remainder of the sports season.

Appeal Process for Disciplinary Action

When infractions occur within the athletic program, the following process may be followed:

A. A Building Hearing Committee composed of the building principal and/or designee, activities director, and coach will be constituted to hear any appeals of disciplinary action taken against student athletes. Upon the imposition of penalty for infraction(s) of any rules or regulations related to interscholastic athletics, any aggrieved student and parents of said student will have the right to an informal conference with the Building Hearing Committee to request that they refrain from enforcing the decision of the coach or ask the coach to reconsider. If the students and parents do not make a written request for this informal conference within five (5) school days of the imposition of the penalty, they will have waived their right to the conference and appeal procedure. The informal conference is to be held within three (3) school days of the request.

B. If the parties are unable to agree at the informal conference, the aggrieved party may appeal to the Building Eligibility Committee. The Building Eligibility Committee consists of the activities director and three student peers and three building staff members named by the building administrator. The Building Eligibility Committee must meet within three (3) school days of the appeals request. The aggrieved party and the coach(es) will be available as a resource.

C. The Building Eligibility Committee will hear the case in detail and will render a decision within three (3) school days after hearing the case.

D. The aggrieved party may appeal to the superintendent of schools within three (3) school days of the appeals decision. The superintendent of schools, after hearing the case in detail, will render a decision within ten (10) school days of the hearing.

E. The aggrieved party may appeal the superintendent’s decision to the Board of Directors within three (3) school days. The Board of Directors, after hearing the case in detail, will render a decision on the case within ten (10) school days of the hearing. This decision will be final.

Technical Fix Date: 07/25/13
Raymond School District #116



2152—INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC PROGRAM PARTICIPATION

Philosophy

The Raymond School District believes that our students develop important life-skills through sports activities that are excellent, fair, safe and accessible and we believe that coaches are the key to such activities. We expect these activities to ensure respect for all involved by valuing others, treating them with dignity and promoting ethical behavior. We strive to provide a safe environment where participants pursue positive relationships and healthy activities. We wish to challenge all students to attain personal academic excellence through participation, competition and teamwork. We will provide access to equitable, fair and diverse activities. We will strengthen character, build confidence and maximize potential through sportsmanship, leadership and service.

When questions or concerns arise, we expect those involved to solve them at the lowest level possible by bringing those concerns directly to the adult most directly connected to the issue. If the issue is not resolved to that person’s satisfaction, that person may then continue up the “chain of accountability” to seek resolution.

Junior High Inclusion During the Season

When, in the coach’s view, it is best for the students and the program to allow some players to “practice up,” he or she may do so only if:

  • The methodology and requirements for choosing those players is:
  • Fair and clearly delineated
  • Discussed at the parents’ meeting for that sport
  • Included in the player’s handbook
  • Posted where it will be easily seen and understood by players
  • Frequently referenced throughout the season
  • There is a plan in place to allow the remaining students to continue to improve their skills during the remainder of the season.
  • There is a plan to be alert to and mitigate any interpersonal issues that may arise as a result of younger students interacting with older students

Unless there is a “salvage” situation, as determined by WIAA rules, junior high players will not “play up;” they may only “practice up.”

Off-season Inclusion

Participation Requirements

Each coach will identify, publish and publicize the clear and measurable requirements that any student who wishes to participate in off-season sports must meet in order to take part in such activities.

Should a planned activity have a maximum number of participants allowed, students who will be in 9th-12th grade in the upcoming season will receive priority. If the number of positions is not filled by the specific date identified by the coach, the remaining positions may be available for any incoming 7th/8th-graders who meet the specified criteria. If an activity does not have a maximum number of participants, all students who meet the requirements to participate will be allowed to participate.

Use of Raymond School District Equipment and Support During Off-season Play

The Raymond School District believes that student athletes benefit from off-season play within the guidelines adopted by the WIAA. The district may provide nominal support for such activities in the form of use of equipment, facilities and transportation assistance. Such assistance is to be given at the District’s discretion, but if provided it will be provided in accordance with all pertinent Title IX and other non-discrimination requirements.

Grading

Students with a failing grade at the beginning of spring/summer practices will be allowed to practice and compete in contests. They will be given probationary status with their eligibility hinging on the posting of semester grades.

Students with more than one failing grade will be able to practice, but will be denied eligibility in contests. This restriction/suspension period will take place until the posting of semester grades. When semester grades are posted, students who receive a failing grade will be denied participation in summer contests, though they may practice. If the grade is rectified through summer school, eligibility may be regained.

Adoption Date: 11/19/13
Raymond School District #116



2152P—INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC PROGRAM PARTICIPATION

Each head coach who wishes to allow junior high students to “practice up” and/or participate in off-season sports activities will develop a plan as described in this policy and submit it to the Athletic Director for review prior to the start of the season. (A sample plan is attached below.) In the first year of implementation there may be a sport season that has already started; in such a case, the head coach will submit a plan in time for the board to review the plan at the next board meeting after the board approves this policy. In addition to the coach’s professional evaluation of the students’ potential, these requirements may include (but are not limited to) such things as:

Participating in “open gym” for a specified number of hours

Participating in weight-lifting or other defined conditioning exercises for a specified number of hours

Participation in a specific number of fund-raisers to support the activity

Upon determining that the plan meets the requirements, the Athletic Director will present those plans to the board for approval in time for implementation that season. Any changes to the approved plan will follow the same procedure.

Sample “Practice Up” Plan

Junior High athletes may have the opportunity to practice with the high school program based on their commitment to the program, evidence of a highly coachable personality and results of their Junior High coaches’ evaluations. The junior high coaching staff is the first step in this process. They may recommend players to the head coach that need more challenging practices in order to better develop their skills appropriately. This process also allows the junior high practices to be targeted for the average or below-average player to develop confidence in the sport. Through the junior high coaching staff’s professional evaluations, they can make recommendations of players who have met the commitment requirement and the coachable personality requirements to practice up with high school teams.

Whether or not a player is committed to the program will be determined by the following criteria:

  • Maximum participation in off-season practices, except as excused by the athlete’s parents
  • Participation in the after-school weight-lifting program a majority of each week during the off-season

Whether or not a player has a coachable personality will be determined by the following criteria:

  • Carrying out the directions of the coaching staff with no hesitation or doubt
  • Receiving no classroom teacher discipline referrals
  • Seeking opportunity to improve and advance their skills beyond the basic requirements of scheduled practices and workouts. This may be evidenced by coming to “open gym,” making unsolicited contact with their coaches asking for more drills, exercises and/or gym time to work on their skills during their own time.

Recognizing that JH and HS players have varying emotional maturity and misunderstandings may arise, when Junior High students are practicing with High School players, coaches will remain particularly vigilant to ensure that there is no bullying or harassment. This vigilance may require varying practice techniques, specific team-building exercises and direct intervention.

Those students who do not “practice up” will continue to be coached in order to improve their skills. Depending on numbers, this may be done through continued Junior High practices or through various opportunities such as AAU and tournaments.

NOTE: Coaches who wish to offer summer activities must develop a similar plan if they wish to allow incoming 7th/8th graders an opportunity to participate.



2153—NON-CURRICULUM RELATED STUDENT GROUPS

Pursuant to the Equal Access Act, the board authorizes non-curriculum related student groups to meet before or after school, subject to the approval of the principal. Such approval shall be granted provided that activities of the group are not disruptive to school operations and the members of the group comply with the rules established by the superintendent and/or school principal. The board authorizes the superintendent to develop administrative procedures to create or maintain this “limited open forum.”

The principal shall approve the non-curriculum related student meeting or activity provided that:

  1. The meeting shall be voluntary and initiated by students.
  2. The school or its staff shall not be a sponsor of the group.
  3. The meeting shall not materially and substantially interfere with the orderly operation of the school.
  4. Students shall be responsible for the direction, control and conduct of the meeting. Guests must be registered and must not be regular participants.
  5. The use of school funds for other than incidental and/or monitoring costs shall not be permitted.
  6. A staff member shall not be compelled to attend when the meeting is contrary to his/her belief.
  7. The constitutional rights of all persons shall be respected.

The principal shall be responsible for the assignment of a room and for the approval and/or assignment of a staff member to monitor the meeting.

Cross References:
Board Policy 2150 Co-Curricular Program

Legal References:
20 U.S.C. 4071-4074 Equal Access Act
WA Const. Art. I,§ II
WA Const. Art IX, § 4

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2153P—NON-CURRICULUM RELATED STUDENT GROUPS

A group of students who wish to conduct a meeting on school premises during non-instructional time shall submit a request to the school principal at least five school-business days prior to the desired meeting date. The principal will great or deny the request at least two school-business days prior to the scheduled date.

The application shall provide:

  1. The name of each student who is making the request,
  2. The name of the monitor of the proposed group (if any),
  3. A description of the proposed meeting along with its state purpose,
  4. The name(s) and affiliations of non-students (if any) who will be invited,
  5. Statements that:
    a. Students shall be voluntarily attending the meeting,
    b. Any non-students shall not be directing, conducting, controlling or regularly attending future meetings and/or activities
  6. The time and frequency of meetings for the proposed group.


2161‑SPECIAL EDUCATION AND RELATED SERVICES FOR ELIGIBLE STUDENTS

The board recognizes that students whose disabilities adversely impact educational performance and who require specially designed instruction can improve their educational performance when they receive special education and related services tailored to fit their needs. The district adopts the state’s full educational opportunity goal to provide students in need of special education services with a free appropriate public education.

Special education programs for eligible students will be an integral part of the general educational programs of this district, and will be operated in compliance with federal and state requirements governing special education. The district will provide a continuum of placement options, which may include services within and outside the district depending on the student’s needs.

Not all students with disabilities are eligible for special education services. The needs of those students will be addressed individually and if, appropriate, the student will be provided accommodations or modifications required under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act in accordance with district policy and procedures.

Mediation or Resolution Agreements

The board authorizes the superintendent or a designee to bind the district to a mediation or resolution agreement.

Commencement Exercises/Certificate of Attendance

In order to participate in commencement exercises, students must have met the minimum criteria for graduation prior to the date of the exercise and otherwise be in good standing with their school through the commencement date. Minimum criteria for participation may be adjusted for students with an IEP whose disabilities have impacted their opportunity to accumulate credits. Each student’s IEP team will determine the student’s graduation plan, including graduation date. IEP students who have attended four years of high school and need additional time to complete IEP goals and/or credits may request participation in commencement exercises. IEP students will receive a certificate of attendance until they complete their credits for graduation.

The district superintendent will develop and maintain special education procedures necessary to implement this policy. This policy and the procedures will be available to the public.

Cross References:
2162 – Education of Students With Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
2163 – Response to Intvervention
2410 – High School Graduation Requirements
3231 – Student Records
3241 – Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action
3246 – Restraint, Isolation and Other Uses of Reasonable Force
4217 – Effective Communication

Legal References:
Chapter 28A.155 RCW Special education
RCW 28A.600.485 Restraint of students with individualized education programs or plans developed under section 504 of the rehabilitation act of 1973 — Procedures — Definitions.
RCW 28A.600.486 District policy on the use of isolation and restraint — Notice to parents and guardians of children who have individualized education programs or plans developed under section 504 of the rehabilitation act of 1973.
RCW 28A.605.020 Parents’ Access to Classroom or School Sponsored Activities — Limitation
Chapter 49.60 RCW Discrimination — Human rights commission
Chapter WAC 392-172A, WAC Rules for the provision of special education
29 U.S.C. 794 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1974, Pub. L. 93‑516, 29 U.S.C. 794
20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004
42 U.S.C. 12131-12133 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
28 CFR Part 35 Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in State and Local Government Services
34 CFR Part 99 Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
34 CFR Part 104 Nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance
34 CFR Part 300 Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities
34 CFR Part 303 Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities

Management Resources:
2016 – March Issue
2014 – June Issue
2009 – October Issue
Policy News, December 2007 Updated Special Education Policy and Procedure
Policy News, June 2007 Graduation Ceremonies for Special Education Students
Policy News, December 1999 Rule Adoption Leads to Special Education Policy

Adoption Date: 08/28/14
Raymond School District #116
Technical Fix: 04/28/201



2161P‑PROCEDURE SPECIAL EDUCATION AND RELATED SERVICES FOR ELIGIBLE STUDENTS

The purpose of the district’s special education program procedures is to address program areas where state and federal regulations require specific local procedures or permit local discretionary choices.

The state regulations governing implementation of special education services pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) of 2004 are addressed in Chapter 392-172A WAC. These procedures do not address all of the requirements established in the regulations. District personnel who are not familiar with the regulations need to contact the special education department director if there are questions regarding special education. These procedures describe how the district implements its special education program.

Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)

The district will apply annually for Federal Part B and state special education funding to assist in the provision of special education and any necessary related services. This funding is in addition to students’ basic education funding and state special education funding.

The superintendent, in consultation with building staff, will annually determine whether to use Early Intervening Services (EIS) funding for students who have not been identified as needing special education or related services, but who need additional academic and behavioral support to succeed in a general education environment.

The district will annually report to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) the number of students receiving EIS; and the number of students who received EIS and subsequently received special education and related services under Part B of IDEA during the preceding two-year period.

Services to eligible special education students, age three to 21, will be provided without charge to the student. This does not include incidental fees that are normally charged to all students. Special education services will include preschool, elementary and secondary education and are provided in conformance with the student’s Individual Education Program (IEP).

The district provides a continuum of services for students, regardless of the funding source. Where the district is unable to provide all or part of the special education or necessary related services, it will make arrangements through contracts with other public or non-public sources, inter-district agreements or interagency coordination.

Students Covered by Public or Private Insurance

The district may use Medicaid or other public insurance benefits programs in which a student participates to provide or pay for services required to provide a FAPE, as permitted by the public insurance program. However, the district will not:

A. Require parents to sign up for or enroll in public benefits or insurance programs in order for their student to receive FAPE under Part B of the IDEA;
B. Require parents to incur an out-of-pocket expense such as the payment of a deductible or co-pay amount incurred in filing a claim;
C. Use a parent or student’s benefits under a public insurance programs if that use would:

1. Decrease available lifetime coverage or any other insured benefit;
2. Result in the family paying for services required after school hours that would otherwise be covered by the public insurance program;
3. Increase premiums or result in discontinuation of insurance; or
4. Risk loss of eligibility for home and community-based waivers, based on aggregate health-related expenditures.

The district may access a parent’s private insurance proceeds to provide FAPE to an eligible student only if the parent provides informed consent to the district. Whenever the district proposes to access the parent’s private insurance proceeds, the district will:

A. Obtain parent consent in accordance with Chapter 392-172A WAC each time the district wishes to access benefits for a new procedure; and
B. Inform the parents that their refusal to permit the district to access their insurance does not relieve the district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost to the parents.

Before first accessing a parent’s or student’s public benefits, for the first time and annually after the first notification, the district will provide written notification using the prior written notice provisions under WAC 392-172A-05010(3) that includes:

A. a statement of the parental consent provisions;
B. a statement of the “no cost” provisions;
C. a statement that the parents may withdraw their consent to disclose personally identifiable information to the agency responsible for administering the state’s public benefits or insurance, and
D. a statement that a parent’s withdrawal or refusal to consent does not relieve the school district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost to the parents.

After providing the required notification, the district will obtain written informed consent from the parent allowing the district to disclose information from the student’s educational records to the agency responsible for administering the state’s public benefits or insurance programs. The consent will specify:

  1. The personally identifiable information that may be disclosed, such as records or information about the services that may be provided to the student;
  2. The purpose of the disclosure;
  3. The agency to which the disclosure will be made; and
  4. That the parent understands and agrees that the public agency may access the parent’s or student’s public benefits or insurance to pay for services under the act.

To avoid financial cost to parents who would otherwise consent to use private insurance, or public benefits if the parent would incur a cost such as a deductible or co-pay, the district may use its Part B funds to pay the cost the parents would incur.

The teacher is responsible for providing the required notices and requests for consent to parents under this section.

Parent Participation in Meetings

The district encourages parental involvement and sharing of information between district and parents to support the provision of appropriate services to its students. As used in these procedures, the term “parent” includes biological and adoptive parents, legal guardians, persons acting in the place of a parent, such as relatives and stepparents, foster parents, persons appointed as surrogate parents and adult students.

Parents (and as appropriate, students) will be provided the opportunity to participate in any meetings with respect to the identification, evaluation, educational placement and provision of a FAPE.

When a meeting is scheduled parents will be:

A. Notified of the meeting early enough that they will have an opportunity to attend; and
B. Notified of the purpose, time, and location of the meeting and who will be in attendance.

When the meeting is to address the IEP or placement:

A. The parent will be notified that the district or the parent may invite others who have knowledge or special expertise of the student; and
B. The meetings will be scheduled at a mutually agreeable time and place.

The district will take whatever action is necessary to ensure that the parent understands the proceedings of the IEP team meeting, including arranging for an interpreter for parents with deafness or whose native language is other than English.

The staff person responsible for inviting the parents to meetings will keep documentation of the information provided and the methods used to notify the parents of the meeting. The district may proceed with the IEP or placement meeting if the district is not able to convince the parent to attend. In this case, the district will document its attempts to arrange the meeting. This documentation will include records of telephone calls and the results, copies of correspondence sent to the parent and/or other means used to contact the parent.

This documentation will be kept in the student’s special education file.

The special education teacher, in cooperation with the special education secretary, will ensure the parents are notified and that the proper forms are used.

If the parent cannot attend the IEP or placement meeting but wishes to participate, the district will arrange for other means to participate. This can include individual or conference phone calls, video or other means of conferencing.

A meeting does not include informal or unscheduled conversations involving district personnel; conversations on issues such as teaching methodology, lesson plans, coordination of service provisions; or preparatory activities that district personnel engage in to develop a proposal or a response to a parent proposal to be discussed at a later meeting.

Identification and Referral (Child Find)

A. Identification

The purpose of Child Find is to locate, evaluate and identify children with suspected disabilities in need of special education services including those who are not currently receiving special education and related services and who may be eligible for those services. Activities are to reach:

  1. Children residing in the school district boundaries including preschool-aged children;
  2. Children attending approved, nonprofit private elementary and secondary schools located within the district boundaries.
  3. Highly mobile children (such as homeless, foster care and migrant children);
  4. Children who have a disability and may need special education services even though they are advancing from grade to grade; and
  5. Children at home or home-schooled.

The district will annually consult with parents and representatives of private school students to ensure its Child Find activities are comparable in approved, nonprofit private schools located within district boundaries.

The district reaches students who may be eligible for special education services through:

  1. Notification to parents of child find activities in its annual informational packet;
  2. Notification to parents district-wide through local papers or other media;
  3. Information regarding child find on the district’s Web site;
  4. Notification to private schools located in the district’s boundaries;
  5. District informational mailings;
  6. Posting notices regarding screening and referral in school buildings and public locations including DSHS community service offices, Employment Security offices, grocery stores, Laundromats, day cares, community preschool sites and physicians’ offices;
  7. Notifying and coordinating with the designated Part C lead agencies;
  8. Early childhood screenings conducted by the district;
  9. Coordination with other public and private agencies and practitioners;
  10. Written information provided to district staff on referral procedures;
  11. Training teachers and administrators on referral/evaluation/identification procedures; and
  12. Review of student behavior, discipline and absentee information and information gathered from district-wide assessment activities.

When district staff have concerns that a student may have a suspected disability which could result in eligibility for special education services, they will notify the building principal.

The South Bend School District conducts early childhood screenings for ages birth to five according to their procedures and schedule. When parents or others inquire about screenings, the caller will be referred to the South Bend Early Learning Center.

The screening process involves the following:

  1. Parents are asked to provide information to assist in assessing their child; and
  2. Children are screened to assess cognitive, communication, physical, social-emotional and adaptive development. Parents will be notified at the screening of the results and the parents will also be provided written notice of the results within ten days of the screening. If the screening supports evaluation, obtain written consent for evaluation at the exit interview if possible, or include consent forms with the written notice notifying the parents of the results. If the screening results indicate that the child does not need an evaluation, written notice will be sent to the parents within 10 days of the screening explaining the basis for the district’s decision not to evaluate. Evaluation occurs in accordance with evaluation procedures.

B. Referral

A student, whether or not enrolled in school, may be referred for a special education evaluation by parents, district staff or other persons knowledgeable about the student. Each building principal will designate a person responsible for ensuring that district staff understands the referral process. Referrals are required to be in writing, unless the person referring is unable to write. A person who makes a referral orally should be asked either to make the referral in writing or go to the main office of the building for assistance in making the referral.

When a referral is made, the district must act within a 25 school-day timeline to make a decision about whether or not the student will receive an evaluation for eligibility for special education services.

All certificated employees will document referrals immediately upon a referral being made to or by them. All other staff receiving a referral from another person will notify the principal. The special education secretary will then be notified and (a) records the referral; (b) provides written notice of the referral to the parent; and (c) advises the school psychologist to collect and review district data and information provided by the parent to determine whether evaluation is warranted.

During the referral period the school psychologist will collect and review existing information from all sources, including parents. Examples may include:

  1. Child’s history, including developmental milestones;
  2. Report cards and progress reports;
  3. Individual teacher’s or other provider information regarding the child including observations;
  4. Assessment data;
  5. Medical information, if provided; and
  6. Other information that may be relevant to assist in determining whether the child should be evaluated.

If the review of data occurs at a meeting, the parent will be invited. The special education secretary provides written notice to the parents of the decision regarding evaluation, whether or not the parents attend the meeting.

Recommendations regarding evaluation are forwarded to the special education department.

After the psychologist reviews the request for evaluation and supporting data and does not suspect that the child has a disability, the district may deny the request. In this case written notice, including the reason for the denial and the information used as the basis for the denial, must be given to the parent.

If the determination is that the child should be evaluated, the reviewers will include information about the recommended areas of evaluation, including the need for further medical evaluation of the student. This information will assist the district in providing parents prior written notice and will assist the district in selecting appropriate evaluation group members. The special education teacher is responsible for notifying parents of the results using prior written notice. When the determination is that the child will be evaluated, parent consent for evaluation and consent for release of appropriate records will be sent with the notice.

The teacher will seek parental consent to conduct the evaluation. The school district is not required to obtain consent from the biological parent if:

  1. The student is a ward of the state and does not reside with a parent;
  2. The parent cannot be located, or their rights have been terminated; or
  3. Consent for an evaluation is given by an individual appointed to represent the student.

When the parent provides consent, the district will select an evaluation group. The evaluation group is to complete the evaluation within 35 school days after the district’s receipt of parent consent, unless:

  1. The parents and district agree in writing to extend the timeline;
  2. The parent fails or refuses to make the student available for the evaluation; or
  3. The student enrolls in another school district after the evaluation is begun, but before completion, and the parent and new district have an agreement for completion of the evaluation.

If a parent does not provide written, informed consent for the evaluation, notify the special education secretary. District staff will make a determination as to whether it wishes to use mediation to seek agreement to evaluate or file a due process hearing to override the parent’s refusal to consent. The district may not override a parent’s refusal to consent for an evaluation if the student is homeschooled or is unilaterally placed in a private school. If the parent does not provide written informed consent and the district does not use mediation or due process, the special education secretary will provide the parent with prior written notice informing the parent that the district cannot proceed with the evaluation to determine eligibility and is not responsible for providing special education and related services without an initial evaluation to determine eligibility.

Evaluation and Reevaluation

Evaluation of Students moving from Part C to Part B and Participation in Transition Planning Conferences

The district will participate in transition planning conferences, arranged by the local lead agency as designee of the Part C lead agency for each student who may be eligible for preschool services. Transition plans will be designed to promote uninterrupted provision of appropriate services to the child.

  1. The principal will serve as the point of contact with the family resource coordinator for timely execution of transition planning conferences that are arranged at least 90 days before the student’s third birthday by the designee of the Part C agency;
  2. The district will follow the procedures for obtaining consent and conducting an initial evaluation, if it determines that the student will be evaluated to determine eligibility for Part B services.

The district will follow the procedures for timelines and evaluation requirements for students moving from Part C to Part B. However, students turning three, who were previously determined eligible for early intervention services under Part C of IDEA, will be evaluated for initial eligibility for special education services under Part B of IDEA. The evaluation must be completed in enough time to develop an initial IEP by the date of the student’s third birthday.

B. Evaluation Requirements

The purpose of the evaluation is to collect information about a student’s functional, developmental and academic skills and achievements from a variety of sources, to determine whether a student qualifies for special education and related services, and to develop an IEP. This includes information provided by the parent. All information gathered in this process is reviewed by the IEP team or other group of qualified professionals.

The evaluation must be an individual assessment designed to determine:

  1. Whether the student is eligible for special education and any necessary related services; and,
  2. The nature and extent of special education and related services needed by the student, including information related to enabling the child to be involved in and progress in the general education curriculum.

The special education director will select the members of the evaluation group. Members selected must be knowledgeable about the student and the areas of suspected disabilities. Qualifications of a group member include having the appropriate professional license or certification and may include outside practitioners when necessary. When assessing for specific learning disabilities, the parent and a group of qualified professionals must be part of the group. If the student requires a medical evaluation in order to determine eligibility, the district will coordinate with the parents to arrange for the evaluation at district expense or through the use of public or private insurance if the parent consents to allow the district to use the insurance.

There are many legal requirements for conducting evaluations. Evaluation procedures or materials must be free of racial, cultural or sexual/gender bias and they must be used for the purpose for which they are valid and reliable. Tests must be appropriate for the student’s age and stage of developmental level. Tests should be administered in the native language of the student or conducted in the mode of communication most familiar to the student. If it appears to be clearly not feasible to conduct a procedure or test in the mode of communication most frequently used by the student, the IEP team will contact the special education administrator to develop an individualized strategy for valid evaluation of the student’s skills. The inclusion of parents in this collaboration is desirable and strongly encouraged.

Specific areas to be included in the evaluation are determined by the teacher, school psychologist and other qualified professionals, as appropriate, as part of a review of existing data concerning the student. The evaluation does not rely on one source or procedure as the sole criterion for determination and should include:

  1. Review of existing data, including corresponding response to intervention (RTI) documentation;
  2. Relevant functional and developmental information;
  3. Information from parents;
  4. Information from other providers;
  5. Information related to enabling access to and progress within the general education curriculum and assisting in determining whether there is a disability and the content of the IEP;
  6. Current classroom-based evaluations, using criterion-referenced and curriculum-based methods, anecdotal records and observations;
  7. Teacher and related service providers’ observations; and
  8. Testing and other evaluation materials, which may include medical or other evaluations when necessary.

All current evaluation data as well as data previously reviewed by the team must be considered. Professional members of the evaluation team need to be familiar with qualifying disability definitions and criteria in federal and state rules.

This review of existing data may be in the form of a meeting of IEP team members, or may be conducted without a meeting. It includes data provided by parents, data gathered in the general education classroom or from state and district level assessments. The data may provide information about the student’s physical condition, social or cultural background and adaptive behavior.

When additional assessments are necessary, the group members have the responsibility of selecting, administering, interpreting and making judgments about evaluation methods and results, and ensuring that the tests and assessments are administered by qualified personnel in accordance with the instructions of the test producer. The gathering of additional data in combination with existing data must be sufficiently comprehensive to address all areas of the suspected disability and any special education needs, whether linked to the disability category or not. If the IEP Team determines that no additional data are needed, the IEP team will notify the student’s parent of that determination and the reasons for it, and inform them of their right to request additional assessments. The district will complete the evaluation using existing data.

Parents and district staff are encouraged to work towards consensus, but the school district has the ultimate responsibility to determine whether the student has a disability or not. The teacher will provide the parent with prior written notice of the eligibility decision, as well as a copy of the evaluation report. If the parent disagrees with the eligibility decision they will be informed of their dispute resolution options described in the procedural safeguards.

C. Specific Learning Disability (SLD)

The district continues to use the severe discrepancy approach for identifying students with a SLD;

Student response is only one element of determining whether a child has a specific learning disability. The evaluation will be comprehensive and address all areas of suspected disability and will also include whether the child performs adequately to meet the grade-level standards in the general curriculum and a determination that the failure to make progress is not the result of:

  1. A physical, mental, emotional, cultural or environmental factor or limited English proficiency; or
  2. Inadequate instruction in reading or mathematics.

The district must act promptly on a referral. Anyone, including parents and teachers, can make a referral at any time. A student cannot be required to progress through all levels of intervention before being evaluated if evidence exists to suspect a disability.)

D. Evaluation of Transfer Students

If a student transfers into the school district while an evaluation process is pending from the other district, the special education secretary is responsible for determining the status of evaluations conducted to date and making a determination as to whether the evaluation can be completed within the 35 school day timeline from the date the parent provided consent. If the determination is that additional time will be needed, the special education secretary will notify the parent and obtain the parent’s agreement to establish a new timeline.

E. Eligibility
The evaluation group and the parent will determine whether or not the student is eligible for special education services.

  1. A student is not eligible if the determinant factor is lack of appropriate instruction in reading or math, based upon the state’s grade level expectations or limited English proficiency; and
  2. Eligibility may be determined by documented professional judgment when:

a. Properly validated tests are unavailable; or
b. Corroborating evidence indicates that results were influenced due to measuring a disability.

The parent will be provided with a copy of the evaluation report and the documentation of determination of eligibility.

Parents will also be provided with prior written notice of the eligibility decision within ten school days of the decision. The special education department is responsible for sending the notice.

Students remain eligible for special education services until one of four events occur:

  1. The student is determined through a reevaluation to no longer be eligible for special education;
  2. The student has met the district’s high school graduation requirements;
  3. The student has reached age 21. A special education student whose 21st birthday occurs after August 31, will continue to be eligible for special education and any necessary related services for the remainder of the school year; or
  4. The student no longer receives special education services based upon a parent’s written revocation of services. When a special education student is expected to graduate prior to age 21, or when graduation is part of the transition plan, the IEP team will document a student’s progress towards achieving course credits towards graduation on the transition portion of the IEP. The district will provide prior written notice to parents and adult students that the student is expected to graduate and will no longer be eligible for special education services. The district will also provide the parents and student with a summary of academic achievement and functional performance and recommendations to assist the student with postsecondary goals.

F. Evaluation Report

Each person conducting an assessment of the student will specify the procedures and instruments used and their results and the significance of findings related to the student’s instructional program, including a specification of the factors interfering with performance and the special education and related services needed.

The evaluation group will determine who is most appropriate to develop the evaluation report reflecting the evaluation information. This will be completed before the conclusion of the evaluation period and will, at a minimum:

  1. Identify the disability which requires special education and related services, if a disability exists;
  2. Discuss assessments and review data supporting conclusions regarding eligibility;
  3. Include the additional information required for the specific learning disability eligibility category;
  4. Describe how the disability or disabilities affect the student’s involvement and progress in the general curriculum;
  5. Make recommendations to the IEP team with respect to special education and related services needed, materials or equipment, instructional and curricular practices, student management strategies, the need for extended school year services beyond 180 school days and location of services;
  6. Include other information, as determined through the evaluation process and parent input;
  7. Include the additional information required for the specific learning disability eligibility category;
  8. Provide any necessary professional judgments and the facts or reasons in support of the judgments; and
  9. Be signed and dated by the evaluation group members certifying their agreement. Any group member who disagrees with the conclusions will prepare a statement presenting the conclusion.
  10. The teacher is responsible for notifying parents of the date, time and location of evaluation meetings by following the procedures in the parent participation section for inviting parents to meetings.

G. Reevaluations

A reevaluation of a student receiving special education or related services is conducted if academic achievement and functional performance has improved to warrant a reevaluation, if the IEP team suspects that the student may no longer be a student with a disability or if the child’s parent or teacher requests a reevaluation. A reevaluation does not occur more than once per year, unless parent and school agree otherwise. A reevaluation must occur at least once every three years, unless parent and school staff agree that a reevaluation is unnecessary. An agreement that an evaluation is unnecessary will be confirmed in writing to the parent. The school psychologist will schedule a review of this determination and notify the special education department.

Students who turn six who met the eligibility requirements for the disability category of “Developmentally Delayed” (DD) under the criteria for ages three to six years need not be reevaluated at age six under the criteria for six to nine years until three years after their initial evaluation was completed

Students who were previously eligible under the category “Developmentally Delayed” must be reevaluated before age nine to determine eligibility within another category.

As part of any reevaluation, the IEP team members and other professionals the district determines appropriate will review existing data that includes:

  1. Evaluations and information provided by the parents;
  2. Current classroom-based assessment, local or state assessments and classroom based observations; and
  3. Observations by other teachers and related services providers data.

Based on this review the team will determine whether any additional data is necessary to determine:

  1. Whether the student continues to be eligible for special education and any necessary related services;
  2. The present levels of performance and educational needs; and
  3. Whether any additions or modifications to the student’s program are needed. This review can occur with or without a meeting or through individual review. If the IEP team members and any other persons reviewing the data determine that no further testing is necessary, the district will notify the parents of this determination, using written prior notice and will inform parents that they have the right to request assessments if they disagree with the determination that additional testing is not necessary. Parent consent is not required if the reevaluation does not require additional testing.
  4. If additional testing is needed:

a. The teacher will request written parental consent for reevaluation and provide prior written notice identifying the areas of assessment;
b. If the parents do not return the signed consent form, the district will send another letter explaining the need for reevaluation and parent consent and will enclose another consent form and a copy of the prior written notice. In addition, the district will document its reasonable attempts to obtain consent such as telephone calls, emails, personal contact and other efforts to obtain consent;
c. If the parents do not respond to the request for consent, and the district has documented its reasonable attempts to obtain consent, the district can proceed with the reevaluation; and
d. If the parents refuse to consent to the reevaluation, the evaluation group will notify the special education director so that the district can determine whether it will seek mediation in order to obtain consent or request a due process hearing to ask an administrative judge to override the parents’ refusal to consent.

After the reevaluation is completed, the teacher will invite parents to the eligibility meeting and provide prior written notice after the meeting of the results of the reevaluation to parents in their primary language, indicating one or more of the following:

  1. Whether the student continues to be eligible and in need of special education;
  2. Present levels of performance and educational needs of the student; and
  3. Whether any additions or modifications to the special education and related services are needed to enable the student to meet IEP annual goals and to participate, as appropriate, in the general curriculum.

This notice will occur within ten school days of the eligibility decision. The special education department the special education secretary is responsible for sending the notice.

H. Reevaluation and Graduation

No reevaluation is required when special education eligibility terminates due to graduation from high school with a regular diploma or due to reaching the end of the school year during which the student turned 21. Instead, the district will provide prior written notice to the student and the parent at least one month before the student’s anticipated last day of school, and the IEP team will provide the student with a summary of academic achievement and functional performance including recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting post-secondary goals. The teacher is responsible for assuring that the IEP team completes the summary of academic achievement and functional performance.

Independent Educational Evaluations (IEE)

Parents of students eligible for special education, students referred for special education and determined to not be eligible, or students determined not to need an evaluation have a right to obtain an IEE at public expense, each time the district has conducted or obtained an evaluation of the student.

When parents request an IEE the district must decide within 15 calendar days whether or not it agrees to provide it. Any parent request for an independent evaluation should be immediately referred to the special education director. The director will review the request and determine whether or not the request is warranted. If the district agrees to provide an IEE, arrangements will be made promptly. If the district denies the request to pay for an IEE, it must file for a due process hearing within 15 calendar days of the parent’s request. The district may request mediation as an option after filing the due process hearing. If the parents withdraw their request for an IEE the due process hearing can be dismissed.

When a parent requests an IEE, the district must provide parents a list of district criteria and evaluators. If the school district initiates a hearing, and a decision is made that the district’s evaluation is appropriate, the parent still has the right to an IEE, but not at public expense. A parent is entitled to only one IEE at public expense each time the district has conducted an evaluation with which the parent disagrees.

If the parent obtains an IEE at either public or private expense, any results of the IEE must be considered by the district if providing FAPE. The IEE may also be presented as evidence at a hearing regarding the student.

The following criteria are established for the selection of an individual to conduct an IEE at public expense. These criteria are established in order to identify the knowledge, experience and qualifications of individuals selected to conduct the evaluations. Any individual selected to conduct either a district evaluation or an IEE must be:

  1. Licensed, credentialed or otherwise qualified within the state of Washington or state of residence/practice to perform an evaluation in the specific professional discipline for which an independent evaluation is sought;
  2. Knowledgeable and experienced in evaluating children with similar disabilities;
  3. Geographically located within the state of Washington (districts may wish to specifically expand the criteria to include practitioners in other states/British Columbia); and
  4. Available to the district at a maximum fee which does not exceed by more than 25% the prevailing average for similar evaluations within the state of Washington.

Exceptions to the criteria will be granted only when it can be shown that the unique circumstances of the child or the disability:

  1. Make it impossible to identify anyone within the state of Washington who holds the appropriate credentials or experience necessary to conduct the evaluation; or
  2. Require a specialized evaluator whose fee exceeds the prevailing average by more than 25%; or
  3. Include factors which would warrant an exception in order to obtain an appropriate evaluation.

Individualized Education Programs (IEP)

A. IEP Development

The term IEP means a written statement for each student eligible for special education that is developed, reviewed, and revised in a meeting in accordance with WAC 392-172A-03095 through WAC 392-172A-03100. The IEP reflects the implementation of instructional programs and other services for students who are eligible for special education services, based on the evaluation of student needs.

An IEP must be in effect before initiation of special education services. The IEP must be developed within 30 calendar days after the student’s initial determination of eligibility for special services. IEPs must be updated annually, or revised more frequently if needed to adjust the program and services.

Parent consent is required before the initial provision of special education services. If a parent refuses to consent to the provision of special education services, the district may not use mediation or due process to override a parent’s refusal. When a parent refuses to provide consent the teacher will notify that the parent that the district does not have a FAPE obligation to the student. The notification will be documented in the student’s file.

The district will maintain a copy of the current IEP which is accessible to all staff members responsible for providing education, other services or implementation of the IEP. All staff members will be informed of their responsibilities for its implementation. This includes not only teachers and other service providers, but also bus drivers, playground and lunchroom supervisors, nursing staff and others who may be responsible for the proper implementation. The building principal is responsible for ensuring that staff members are knowledgeable about their responsibilities.

IEPs will be implemented without undue delay following IEP meetings, regardless of the payment source for special education and or related services.

Parents are members of the IEP team and will have the opportunity to participate fully. The district will make sure that the parents understand the proceedings, including arranging for an interpreter for parents who are deaf or whose native language is other than English. The district will also ensure that meeting locations are accessible. The special education department is responsible for coordinating interpreters and making arrangements for the meeting location.

The district will provide parents/guardians with a copy of the district’s Restraint, Isolation and Other Uses of Reasonable Force (Policy 3246) with each initial and annual IEP.

B. IEP Team

The IEP team includes:

  1. The parents of the student;
  2. Not less than one general education teacher (or preschool teacher) of the student if the student is, or will be, participating in the general education environment. The general education teacher will, to the extent appropriate, participate in development of the student’s IEP, including determinations of: 1) appropriate positive behavioral interventions and supports for the student; and 2) supplementary aids and services, program modifications, and support for school personnel consistent with WAC 392-172A-01185 and WAC 392-172A-03110(2)(b);
  3. Not less than one special education teacher, or if appropriate, not less than one special education provider of the student;
  4. A representative of the district, who is qualified to provide or supervise the provision of special education and related services, is knowledgeable about general education curriculum, and is knowledgeable about the availability of district resources;
  5. An individual who can interpret the instructional implications of the evaluation results;
  6. Any other individuals who have knowledge or special expertise about the student. These individuals may be invited by both the district and the parents, at the discretion of the person making the invitation;
  7. The student, when appropriate, or when required;
  8. Students must be invited when the purpose of the meeting includes discussion of transition needs or services;
  9. If another agency is or may be responsible for payment or provision of transition services, an agency representative will be invited, with the parent’s consent. If the agency representative cannot attend the meeting, district personnel will keep the representative informed of the meeting and obtain agency information that will assist in the service provision; and
  10. Parents will be notified of the participation of the Part C service coordinator or other designated representatives of the Part C system as specified by the state lead educational agency for Part C at the initial IEP meeting for a child previously served under Part C of IDEA.

The parents and district must agree in writing before any of the above team members are excused from all or part of a meeting. If a team member’s area of the IEP is being discussed or modified, then the parent and district must consent to their excusal; and that specific team member must provide advance written input for their part of the IEP prior to the meeting. The proper form will be provided by the teacher so that the parent may consent to the absence of the team member.

Existing team members may fill more than one of these roles if they meet the criteria for the role.

Sometimes parents do not attend IEP meetings. There will also be times the parents do not agree with the IEP as proposed, and despite attempts to reach agreement on IEP content, the team does not reach agreement. If a parent attends the IEP meeting and agreement is not reached on the IEP, the team will determine whether another IEP meeting should be scheduled as soon as mutually possible, or whether there is enough information to complete the IEP. When the decision is made that the IEP will be implemented the district must send prior written notice of the decisions reached to the parent, including the date the IEP will be implemented.

When the parents do not attend the IEP meeting, despite the district’s efforts to ensure participation, or if the team does not reach agreement, it is the district’s obligation to offer an appropriate educational program:

  1. Have IEP members present sign the IEP (or document participation if any member is unwilling to sign);
  2. Send a copy to the parent, and provide the parent prior written notice that the district intends to implement the IEP; and
  3. Forward the documentation of actual or attempted contacts to the special education secretary for processing when parents do not attend the meeting.

When making changes to an IEP after the annual IEP meeting for a school year, the parent and the district may agree not to convene an IEP meeting for the purpose of making changes. The parent and the district must complete a written document indicating the changes and inform IEP team members and appropriate individuals of the changes, initiated by the teacher. If the parent requests that the district revise the IEP to include the amendments, the teacher will revise the IEP.

C. IEP Preparation and Content

IEP teams will consider the recommendations in the initial or most recent evaluation to develop the IEP. In developing each IEP, the team must consider:

  1. The strengths of the student including the academic, developmental and functional needs of the student and the concerns of the parents for enhancing the education of their child;
  2. Whether positive behavioral interventions and supports, including a behavioral intervention plan, as defined by WAC 392-172A-01031, are needed to address the student’s behavior;
  3. The language needs of the student as those needs relate to the student’s IEP, for a student with limited English proficiency;
  4. Whether Braille instruction is appropriate for a student who is blind or visually impaired;
  5. The communication needs of the student (and in the case of a student who is deaf or hard of hearing, consider the student’s language and communication needs), opportunities for direct communications with peers and professional personnel in the student’s language and communication mode; academic level; and full range of needs, including opportunity for direct instruction in the student’s language and communication mode; and
  6. Whether assistive technology devices or services are needed.

IEP content must include:

  1. The student’s present levels of academic and functional performance with a description of how the disability(ies) affect the student’s involvement and progress in the general curriculum or preschool activities;
  2. Measurable academic and functional annual goals for the student (including benchmarks or short term objectives if the student is participating in alternate assessments) that will meet the student’s needs resulting from the disability(ies) to enable involvement and progress in the general curriculum or in preschool activities, and will meet the student’s other educational needs;
  3. A statement of special education services, any necessary related services, and supplementary aids and services based on peer-reviewed research to the extent practicable to be provided to the student and program modifications or supports for personnel so that the student may advance towards annual goals, progress in the general curriculum, and be educated and participate with other special education students and non-disabled students and participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities;
  4. A statement of the extent, if any, that the student will not participate with non-disabled students in general classroom, extra-curricular, and non-academic activities;
  5. A statement of any individual appropriate accommodations in the administration of state or district-wide assessments of student achievement that are needed to measure academic achievement and functional performance of the child on state assessments. If the team determines that the student will not participate in a particular assessment, the IEP will address why the student cannot participate in the regular assessment(s) and why the particular alternative assessment is appropriate for the child;
  6. The date for the beginning of services and the anticipated frequency, location and duration of services and modifications;
  7. A statement of how the student’s progress towards goals will be measured, how the student’s parents will be regularly informed of their child’s progress towards the annual goals and whether the progress is sufficient to enable the student to achieve the goal by the end of the year. Measurement of the student’s progress will be based on the data collected as designated on the IEP. The individual responsible for implementing the goal is responsible for maintaining the data used to measure progress. Information to the parents can be provided at the same time the district issues progress reports or report cards, or other agreed times as identified in the IEP.
  8. The projected beginning date for the special education and related services;
  9. With an IEP that is in effect when the child turns 16, or sooner if the IEP team determines it is appropriate, a statement of needed transition services and any interagency responsibilities or needed linkages. The transition component must include appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based on age appropriate transition and assessments related to training, education, employment and independent living skills where appropriate; and the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals;
  10. Emergency response protocols, if determined necessary by the IEP team for the student to receive FAPE and parents provide consent. Emergency response protocols must meet the requirements stated in WAC 392-172A-02105 ;
  11. A behavioral intervention plan (BIP), if determined necessary by the IEP team for a student to receive FAPE. The BIP must meet the requirements stated in WAC 392-172A-01301;
  12. The procedures by which parents/guardians will be notified of the use of isolation or restraint or a restraint device on their student (see Procedure 3246).
  13. A statement regarding transfer of rights at the age of majority. The teacher will provide prior written notice to the student one year prior to student turning 18 years of age; and
  14. Extended school year (ESY) services. The consideration for ESY services is a team decision, based on information provided in the evaluation report, and based on the individual needs of a student. ESY services are not limited by categories of disability, or limited by type, amount, or duration of the services. If the need for ESY services is not addressed in the IEP, and ESY services may be appropriate for the student, the IEP team will meet by 15 May to address the need for ESY. Factors for the team to consider when determining the need for ESY may include, but are not limited to: 1) Evidence of regression or recoupment time based on documented evidence; or 2) A documented determination based on the professional judgment of the IEP team, including consideration of the nature and severity of the student’s disability, the rate of progress and emerging skills.

Use of isolation, restraint and restraint devices:

A. Definitions

Imminent: The state or condition of being likely to occur at any moment or near at hand, rather than distant or remote.

Isolation: Restricting a student alone within a room or any other form of enclosure, from which the student may not leave. It does not include a student’s voluntary use of a quiet space for self-calming, or temporary removal of a student from his or her regular instructional area to an unlocked area for purposes of carrying out an appropriate positive behavior intervention plan.

Likelihood of serious harm: A substantial risk that physical harm will be inflicted by a student:

a. upon his or her own person, as evidenced by threats or attempts to commit suicide or inflict physical harm on oneself;
b. upon another, as evidenced by behavior that has caused such harm or that places another person or persons in reasonable fear of sustaining such harm;
c. upon the property of others, as evidenced by behavior that has caused substantial loss or damage to the property of others; or
d. after the student has threatened the physical safety of another and has history of one or more violent acts.

Positive behavioral intervention: Strategies and instruction that can be implemented in a strategic manner in order to provide alternatives to challenging behaviors, reinforce desired behaviors, and reduce or eliminate the frequency and severity of challenging behaviors. Positive behavioral interventions include the consideration of environmental factors that may trigger challenging behaviors and teaching a student the skills to manage his or her own behavior.

Restraint: Physical intervention or force used to control a student, including the use of a restraint device. It does not include appropriate use of a prescribed medical, orthopedic or therapeutic device when used as intended, such as to achieve proper body position, balance or alignment or to permit a student to safely participate in activities.

Restraint device: A device used to assist in controlling a student, including, but not limited to, metal handcuffs, plastic ties, ankle restraints, leather cuffs, other hospital-type restraints, pepper spray, tasers, or batons. Restraint device does not mean a seat harness used to safely transport students. This definition is consistent with RCW 28A.600.485(1)(c), and is not intended to endorse or encourage the use of such devices or techniques with district students.

B. Practices presumed to be unreasonable when correcting or restraining any student under the age of 18:
Under RCW 9A.16.100, the following is a non-exclusive list of acts that are presumed unreasonable when correcting or restraining a child:

  1. throwing, kicking, burning, or cutting a child;
  2. striking a child with a closed fist;
  3. shaking a child under the age of three:
  4. interfering with a child’s breathing;
  5. threatening a child with a deadly weapon; or
  6. doing any other act that is likely to cause bodily harm to a student greater than transient pain or minor temporary marks.

This non-exclusive list should not be read so as to imply that another, unlisted form of correction or restraint is permissible. Whether or not an unlisted use of force or restraint is presumptively permissible depends upon a balanced consideration of all relevant state laws and regulations, and whether the use is reasonable under the totality of the circumstances.

C. Conditions specific to use of isolation:

  1. The isolation must be discontinued as soon as the likelihood of serious harm has dissipated;
  2. The enclosure will be ventilated, lighted and temperature controlled from inside or outside for purposes of human occupancy.
  3. The isolation enclosure will permit continuous visual monitoring of the student from outside the enclosure.
  4. An adult responsible for supervising the student will remain in visual or auditory range of the student at all times.
  5. Either the student shall be capable of releasing himself or herself from the enclosure, or the student shall continuously remain within view of an adult responsible for supervising the student.
  6. Any staff member or other adults using isolation must be trained and certified by a qualified provider in the use of isolation, unless trained personnel are not immediately available due to the unforeseeable nature of the emergency.

D. Conditions specific to use of restraint and restraint devices:

  1. The use of restraint or a restraint device must be discontinued as soon as the likelihood of serious harm has dissipated;
  2. The restraint or restraint device will not interfere with the student’s breathing;
  3. Any staff member or other adults using restraint or restraint devices must be trained and certified by a qualified provider in the use of such restraint or restraint devices, unless trained personnel are not immediately available due to the unforeseeable nature of the emergency.
  4. In the case of a restraint device, either the student will be capable of releasing himself or herself from the restraint device or the student shall continuously remain within view of an adult responsible for supervising the student.

E. Prohibited practices involving restraint, use of force, and discipline:

The following practices are prohibited with students eligible for special education services:

  1. District personnel are prohibited from using aversive interventions;
  2. District personnel are prohibited from physically restraining or isolating a student, except when the student’s behavior poses an imminent likelihood of serious harm as defined above;
  3. No student may be stimulated by contact with electric current, including, but not limited to, tasers;
  4. A student may not be denied or subjected to an unreasonable delay in the provision of food or liquid as a form of punishment;
  5. A student may not be the recipient of force or restraint that is either unreasonable under the circumstances or deemed to be an unreasonable form of corporal punishment as a matter of state law (see above, for example, for a list of practices presumed to be unreasonable when used in correcting or restraining a child);
  6. A student must not be denied or subjected to an unreasonable delay in the provision of common hygiene care;
  7. A student must not be denied or subjected to an unreasonable delay in the provision of medication;
  8. A student may not be excluded from his or her regular instructional or service area and isolated within a room or any other form of enclosure, except under the conditions set forth in WAC 392-172A-02110;
  9. A student must not be forced to listen to noise or sound that the student finds painful;
  10. A student must not be forced to smell or be sprayed in the face with a noxious or potentially harmful substance;
  11. A student must not be forced to taste or ingest a substance which is not commonly consumed or which is not commonly consumed in its existing form or concentration;
  12. A student’s head must not be partially or wholly submerged in water or any other liquid.
  13. A student must not be physically restrained or immobilized by binding or otherwise attaching the student’s limbs together or by binding or otherwise attaching any part of the student’s body to an object, except under the conditions set forth in WAC 392-172A-02110.

Documentation and Reporting Requirements

Districts must follow the documentation and reporting requirements for any use of isolation, restraint, or a restraint device consistent with RCW 28A.600.485 and the parental notification requirement of RCW 28A.155.210. See Policy and Procedure 3246.

F. Transfer Students

Students who transfer from one district to another within the state continue to be eligible for special education and any necessary related services. When an eligible student transfers into the district, the building principal will notify the special education department. The special education department and principal in consultation with parents will review the student’s IEP to ensure the district provides services comparable to those in the previous IEP until the district adopts the previous IEP or develops, adopts and implements a new IEP.

When a student who was identified as eligible for special education transfers from out of state into the district, the building principal will notify the special education department as soon as possible. The school psychologist will review the evaluation, eligibility documentation and IEP to determine whether or not the student meets state eligibility criteria. If the student meets the state eligibility criteria, the district will follow the procedures described in the previous paragraph to provide comparable services until the district develops an IEP for the student. If the student needs to be evaluated to determine eligibility in this state, the school psychologist will notify the parents, obtain consent and evaluate the student for eligibility within 35 school days of the receipt of the parent’s consent. The district, in consultation with the parents, will continue to provide special education services comparable to the services on the student’s IEP, pending the results of the initial evaluation.

The district must take reasonable steps to promptly obtain records, including IEP supporting documents and any other records related to special education or related services from the previous school. The special education secretary is responsible to make this request.

Placement

No student may receive special education and related services without being determined eligible for services, and thus the evaluation process and IEP development precedes the determination of the special education placement. When a student has been evaluated and the evaluation team and parent have determined student eligibility and the need for special education and related services, programming decisions must occur. These decisions are made on the basis of information generated through the evaluation and IEP processes. The actual program is considered within the context of least restrictive environment (LRE) and the continuum of placement alternatives (reviewed below). When determining initial eligibility for special education, including determination of the appropriate placement, the parent or adult student must provide written consent for services before the student receives special education services. If the parents do not consent to the provision of special education and related services, the district will not provide special education services to the student. The district will notify the parents that the student is eligible for services and that the district is willing to provide the services when the parent provides written consent. The notification will also inform parents that the district has no FAPE obligation to the student when parents refuse to provide consent.

When program decisions are addressed by the IEP team, proper consideration must be given to the LRE. Within the educational setting, the student should be placed, whenever possible:

  1. In the school the disabled student would normally attend; and
  2. With non-disabled students in the general educational setting to the maximum extent possible.

Special classes, separate schools or removal of students with disabilities from the general education environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in the general education classroom with use of supplementary aids and services cannot be satisfactorily achieved.

If the IEP team believes that the student will not be successful within the general education classroom, the team will consider:

  1. The educational benefits of full-time placement in a regular classroom;
  2. The non-academic benefits of such a placement;
  3. The effect the student will have on the teacher and other students in the regular classroom; and
  4. The costs of placing the student in the regular classroom.

The degree to which the student is to be integrated into the general classroom setting is dependent upon the identified needs of the student. This placement is to occur unless the nature of the needs are so severe that this cannot be satisfactorily achieved, even with supplementary aids and services. If the placement is in another building, the appropriate educational placement will be as close to the student’s home as reasonably possible.

Within the nonacademic setting, students will be provided nonacademic and extracurricular activities with non-disabled students, to include counseling services, athletics, transportation, health services, recreational activities, clubs, etc. Limits on nonparticipation or conditions of participation, if any, must be designated in the IEP.

The district will also make opportunities available for students eligible for special education to participate with non-disabled students in all of the district’s classes where at all practicable.

Within the district, a continuum of alternative placement options exists spanning within a class, resource room, self-contained, home-bound and out-of-district provisions. These options are intended to address the individual needs of students and they are considered according to the following process:

The placement of each student with a disability will be determined annually, or sooner if appropriate, by the IEP team.

The appropriateness of placement options will be based upon various decisions including:

  1. Data-based judgments in IEP development;
  2. Judgments (data-based) in determining LRE;
  3. The reasonable probability of the placement option(s) assisting the student to attain annual goals and objectives and the quality of services needed; and
  4. The consideration of potentially harmful effects upon the student or on the quality of services needed.

Placement options along the continuum must include alternative placement options identified in the definition of special education and make provisions for supplementary services such as resource room or itinerant instruction to be provided in concert with the general education placement.

Students Unilaterally Enrolled in Private Nonprofit Schools by Parents

By October 1 of each year, the district will conduct an annual count of the number of private elementary and secondary school students eligible for special education who are unilaterally enrolled by their parents in a private school located within district boundaries. The special education director will have timely and meaningful consultation with appropriate representatives of private schools and representatives of parents of private school students and make determinations about who will receive services and what services will be provided. The purpose of the child count is to determine the proportionate amount that the district must spend on providing special education and related services, including transportation, to private elementary or secondary school students in the next fiscal year.

The district is required to spend a proportionate amount of federal special education Part B and Section 619 funds to provide special education and related services to private school students. In order to determine which students will receive services, what services will be provided, how and where the services will be provided, and how services provided will be evaluated, the district will consult with appropriate representatives and parents of private school students. The district will make the final decision with respect to services to be provided to eligible private school students.

The special education office will notify each approved nonprofit private school operating in the district seeking recommendations of persons to serve as representatives of special education private school students in consultations with the district. An initial meeting will be called by the district to establish a work plan and schedule with the private school representatives and representatives of private school parents to discuss how to identify students, the amount of proportionate share, how the proportionate share was calculated, which students will receive services, what services will be provided, how and where services will be provided, and how services will be evaluated.

A private school student has no individual entitlement to any service or amount of service (s)he would have received if enrolled in a public school to receive FAPE. However, for each private school student receiving special education or related services, the district will initiate and conduct meetings to develop, review and revise a services plan describing the special education and related services that the district will provide. The services plan must: (1) meet IEP content requirements as appropriate; and (2) be developed, reviewed, implemented and revised annually consistent with the requirements for IEP review. The district will make every effort to include a representative from the private school at each meeting. If the private school representative is not able to attend, the district will use other methods, including individual or conference telephone calls, to assure the representative’s participation.

Private school students may receive a different amount of services than students in public schools who receive special education. However, the special education services provided to eligible private school students will be provided by personnel meeting the same standards as personnel providing the services in the district.

Services to students in private schools including private sectarian schools may be provided on-site. District personnel may be made available to private schools only to the extent necessary to provide the services required, if those services are not normally provided by the private school. Services will not include payment of private school teachers’ or other employees’ salaries, except for services performed outside regular private school hours and under public supervision and control.

Equipment and/or supplies may be placed on private school premises for the period of time necessary for the services plan program, but the district will retain and exercise title and administrative control of said equipment/supplies. The district will keep records and make an accounting assuring that said equipment/supplies is/are used solely for the services plan program. Said equipment/supplies will be removed if necessary to avoid its/their use for other purposes or if no longer needed for the services plan program. No district funds will be used for repairs, minor remodeling or construction of private school facilities.

The district will provide services to students in private schools in a manner that: (1) maintains physical and administrative separation between the private and public school programs; and (2) does not benefit the private school at public expense.

Procedural Safeguards

A. Notice of Procedural Safeguards
 In addition to protections provided to parents of eligible students, parents also have procedural safeguard protections when a student’s identification, evaluation or placement is at issue. The school district special education secretary or teacher will provide a copy of the procedural safeguards notice to the parents and adult students one time a year and:

  1. Upon initial referral or parent request for evaluation;
  2. Upon receipt of the parent’s first state complaint and first request for due process hearing in a school year;
  3. Upon a disciplinary action that will result in a disciplinary change of placement; and
  4. Upon request by the parent.

The procedural safeguard notice used by the district includes a full explanation of all the procedural safeguards relating to independent educational evaluation, prior written notice, parental consent, access to educational records, discipline procedures for students who are subject to placement in an interim alternative educational setting, requirements for unilateral placement by parents of children in private schools at public expense, state complaint procedures, mediation, the child’s placement during pendency of due process proceedings including requirements for disclosure of evidence, due process hearings, civil actions and attorney’s fees. Copies of the district’s special education procedural safeguards are available from the director of special education.

B. Consent

The district will obtain informed, written parental consent before:

  1. Conducting an initial evaluation;
  2. Providing initial special education and related services to a student; and
  3. Conducting a reevaluation if the reevaluation includes administration of additional assessments.

Parental consent is not required to review existing data as part of an evaluation or reevaluation, or to administer a test or other evaluation that is administered to all students unless consent is required of all students’ parents.

Informed consent means that the parent or adult student:

  1. Has been fully informed of all information that is relevant to the activity for which the district is asking consent, and that the information is provided in his or her native language or other mode of communication;
  2. Understands and agrees in writing to the activity for which consent is sought and the consent describes the activity and lists any records which will be released and to whom; and
  3. Understands that the granting of consent is voluntary and may be revoked at any time. If consent is revoked, the revocation does not negate an action that has occurred after the consent was given and before the consent was revoked.

The district may not use a parent’s refusal to consent to one service or activity to deny the parent or child any other service, benefit or activity of the district.

If the district is unable to obtain a parent’s consent, the district may use mediation procedures to obtain a parent’s consent or request a due process hearing asking the administrative law judge to override the parent’s refusal to consent to an evaluation or reevaluation. The district may not request a due process hearing to override a parent’s refusal to consent to initial special education services. The district may not use mediation or due process procedures to override a parent’s refusal to consent to an evaluation or reevaluation if the student is homeschooled or enrolled in a private school.

C. Revocation of Consent

Parents may revoke consent for the continued receipt of special education and related services. If parents revoke consent, the staff member receiving the revocation will forward the revocation to the special education secretary. Upon receipt of the parent’s written notice of revocation, the secretary will provide prior written notice within a reasonable time before the district stops providing services. The notice will include information about the effect of revocation and will inform the parent of the date the district will stop providing special education and related services.

Discontinuation of special education and related services in response to the parent’s written revocation will not be in violation of FAPE and eliminates the district’s requirement to convene an IEP meeting or develop an IEP. However, the district does have a continuing Child Find duty, and staff will follow referral procedures if they believe the student should be referred for special education. In addition, parents may request that the district conduct an initial evaluation for eligibility for special education services after they have revoked consent for continued services.

D. Prior Written Notice

Prior written notices are provided to parents when a district makes a decision relating to a student’s identification, evaluation, placement, or provision of a FAPE. Prior written notices document the decisions made by the IEP teams and evaluation group.

The district will provide prior written notice to the parent whenever the district proposes or refuses to initiate or change the identification, evaluation, educational placement or provision of a FAPE to the student.

The prior written notice will include:

  1. A statement that the parents have procedural safeguard protections and if a copy of the procedural safeguards do not accompany the notice, a statement that describes how a copy of the statement of procedural safeguards may be obtained;
  2. A description of the action proposed or refused by the district;
  3. An explanation of why the district proposes or refuses to take the action and a description of other options that the district considered and the reasons why the options were rejected;
  4. A description of any other factors which are relevant to the district’s proposal or refusal;
  5. A description of each evaluation procedure, test, record or report the district used as a basis for the proposal or refusal; and
  6. A description of any evaluation procedures the district proposes to conduct and sources for parents to contact for assistance in understanding the procedural safeguards provision of this chapter.

Prior written notice and the notice of procedural safeguards must be provided in the native language of the parent or other mode of communication used by the parent unless it is clearly not feasible to do so. If the native language or other mode of communication of the parent is not a written language, the district will take steps to ensure that the notice is translated orally or by other means to the parent. This may involve:

  1. Arranging for an interpreter if English is not the native language of the parent or if the parent has a hearing impairment; or
  2. Providing notice orally if the written language is not a native language.

The district will document in writing how this information was provided and that the parent understands the content of the notice. Teachers are responsible for sending prior written notices after evaluation, eligibility, IEP team and placement decisions.

E. Transfer of Educational Rights to an Adult Student

When a student eligible for special education reaches the age of 18, all educational rights under Part B of the IDEA, previously exercised by the parent, transfer to the student, unless the student is determined incapacitated in a guardianship proceeding or the district has appointed an educational representative for the student. When the student turns 18, the special education teacher will notify the parent and student that the educational rights have transferred to the student and will send any required notices to both the parent and the adult student.

At an IEP meeting occurring one year before the student turns 18, the district will inform the parents and the student that educational rights will transfer to the student and the district will inform the student about those educational rights. This information will be documented on the IEP.

Appointment of an Educational Representative

A student over the age of eighteen is presumed to be capable of making educational decisions and able to provide informed consent unless he or she is determined to be “incapacitated” through a legal guardianship proceeding. If a parent, another interested party, or the district believes that a student over the age of eighteen is unable to provide informed consent or to make educational decisions, and the student does not have a legal guardian, the parent or other interested party may ask the district to appoint an educational representative. This determination will only be made if two separate professionals, as defined by WAC 392-172A-05135(5)(a), state that they conducted an examination and interviewed the student, and concluded the student is incapable of providing informed consent. The district will inform the student of the decision and appoint either, the spouse, the student’s parents, another adult or a surrogate educational representative to represent the student. The appointment of the educational representative will continue for one year.

The student or other adult may challenge the certification at any time. If a challenge occurs, the district will not rely on the education representative, until the representative is recertified.

Confidentiality and Records Management

The superintendent is responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of personally identifiable information pertaining to special education and all other students. The HR officer will maintain, for public inspection, a current list of the names and positions of district employees who have access to personally identifiable information of special education students. The district will provide parent and adult students, upon request, a list of the types and locations of educational records collected, maintained or used by the district.

The district will provide instruction annually to employees collecting or using personally identifiable information on the procedures to protect the confidentiality of personally identifiable information. The training will address the protections outlined in WAC 392-172A, state law and federal regulations implementing the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, FERPA, (34 CFR Part 99).

Upon request, the parent(s) of a special education student or adult student will be afforded an opportunity to inspect, review and challenge all educational records which will include, but not be limited to, the identification, evaluation, delivery of educational services and provision of FAPE to the student. The district will comply with the request promptly and before any meeting regarding an IEP or hearing relating to the identification, evaluation, educational placement of the student or provision of FAPE to the student, including disciplinary proceedings. In any case, the district will respond no more than 45-calendar days after the date the district received the request. If an educational record includes information on more than one student, the parents (and/or adult student) may inspect and review only information relating to their child. School personnel receiving requests for educational records will immediately forward the request to the special education secretary.

If parents believe that information in an education record is inaccurate or misleading or violates the privacy or rights of the student, they may request that the district amend the information. Policy and Procedure 3231, Student Records, describes the process and timelines for challenges and hearings regarding student records.

The district follows the guidelines for records retention outlined in the Secretary of State’s, General Records Retention Schedule and Records Management Manual. The district will inform parents or adult students when personally identifiable information collected, maintained or used is no longer needed to provide educational services to the student. The information will be destroyed at the request of the parent(s) or adult student, or will be provided to the parent or adult student upon their request. However, a permanent record of the student’s name, address and phone number, his or her grades, attendance, record, classes attended, grade level completed and year completed will be maintained without time limitation.

Records management is also governed by Policy and Procedure 4040, Public Access to District Records.

Surrogate Parents

A surrogate parent is a person appointed by the school district to act on behalf of a student to help ensure the rights of the student to a FAPE when a parent cannot be identified, the whereabouts of the parent are unknown or the student is a ward of the state and does not have a foster parent.

The special education director is responsible for determining the need for appointment of a surrogate parent.

Natural or adoptive parents, foster parents, persons acting in the place of a parent such as stepparents or relatives, and persons with legal custody or guardianship are considered parents. Students who are homeless and not living with a parent may need a surrogate parent.

The following is guidance for the district to follow to assist in determining the status of the parent’s rights to make educational decisions:

  1. In cases where the student is in and out of home care the district must determine the legal custodial status of the child.
  2. Parents who have voluntarily placed their child in state placement still retain legal custody of the child and retain the right to make educational decisions. In this situation the student is not a ward of the state;
  3. Parents whose children are placed in group care, pending a determination of “dependency” may still retain rights to make educational decisions unless otherwise ordered by the court;
  4. When a disposition order and order of dependency is issued, the state becomes the legal as well as physical custodian of the child. Parents may no longer have the right to make educational decisions during this stage of dependency; and
  5. Parents whose parental rights are terminated no longer have the right to make educational decisions on behalf their child.

When a student is placed in foster care the foster parent may act as the parent. When a student is placed in group care, the district will work with the parents, case-worker(s), foster parents, and others who have knowledge of the student’s legal status in order to determine the need for appointment of a surrogate.

When selecting a surrogate parent, the district will select a person willing to participate in making decisions regarding the student’s educational program, including participation in the identification, evaluation, placement of and provisions of FAPE to the student.

If a student is referred for special education or a student eligible for special education who may require a surrogate parent transfers into the district, the district special education office will be notified of the potential need. The special education office will then select a trained individual who can adequately represent the student to ensure that all student rights are observed.

The person selected as a surrogate:

  1. Must have no interest that conflicts with the interests of the student he or she represents;
  2. Must have knowledge and skills that assure adequate representation of the student; and
  3. May not be an employee of a school district and/or other agency which is involved in the education or care of the student. This includes OSPI, DSHS, district employees and group care providers.

The district will at a minimum, review with the surrogate parent procedural safeguards, parent involvement in the special education process, parent education publications and special education regulations. The district will also cooperate with other districts, the ESD or OSPI in training surrogate parents and in establishing a list of persons willing and able to serve as surrogate parents.

Mediation

The purpose of mediation is to offer both the parent and the school district an alternative to a formal due process hearing. Mediation is voluntary and requires the consent and agreement of both parties. Mediation cannot be used to deny or delay access by a parent to a due process hearing. Mediation is used to resolve disagreements concerning the identification, evaluation and delivery of educational services or provision of a FAPE to a special education student. Mediation may be terminated by either party at any time during the process.

The primary participants are the parents, school district representatives and mediator. The process is voluntary, confidential, and informal. It is a collaborative process, conducted in a non-adversarial manner. Mediation services will be provided by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) at no cost to either party.

The district’s special education director is responsible for coordinating requests for mediation. If a parent requests mediation, notify the director and the director will respond to the parent and coordinate with OSPI’s contracted agent. Staff members are reminded that discussions that occur during the mediation process are confidential.

One person designated by the district to attend the mediation must have authority to bind the district in any agreement reached through mediation.

Due Process Hearing

Both parents and districts may file due process hearings involving the identification, evaluation, placement or provision of FAPE to a student. IDEA requires that specific information be provided as part of a due process hearing request. The requirements are identified in the notice of procedural safeguards. If parents request information about how to file a due process hearing, the district will provide the parent with a due process hearing request that contains the required information. Due process hearing request forms are available from the OSPI Special Education and Administrative Resources Web site.

If any staff receives a request for a due process hearing, a copy of the request should be immediately forwarded to the special education director. If the parent has not filed the request for hearing with OSPI, the district will forward the parent request to OSPI Administrative Resources Section. The district may not delay or deny a parent’s due process hearing request. Parents are entitled to a copy of the notice of procedural safeguards if this is the first due process hearing in a school year. The teacher is responsible for providing the parents a copy of the procedural safeguards in this situation and documenting that the safeguards were provided to the parent.

When a parent files a due process hearing, the student remains in the placement at the time of the request for hearing, unless the parents and district agree to a different placement. See the discipline section below for placements when a disciplinary action is challenged.

When parents file a request for a due process hearing, the special education director will immediately schedule a resolution meeting. The meeting must occur within 15 days after a parent files a due process request with the district and provides a copy of the request to OSPI, or, within seven days if the hearing request involves an expedited hearing regarding discipline. The director will determine the appropriate district staff that will attend the resolution meeting. The district will ensure that one of the district representatives attending the resolution meeting has authority to bind the district in any resolution agreement. The district will not bring district counsel to a resolution meeting unless the parent is bringing an attorney to the meeting.

Any resolution agreement reached will be documented in writing and is binding on the parties. The document will inform the parent of their right to void the agreement within three business days of signing the agreement.

Discipline

Students eligible for special education may be disciplined consistent with the disciplinary rules that apply to all students. The district will determine on a case by case basis whether discipline that is permitted under WAC 392-400 should occur. However, students eligible for special education must not be improperly excluded from school for disciplinary reasons that are related to their disability or related to the district’s failure to implement a student’s IEP. The district will take steps to ensure that each employee, contractor, and other agents of the district responsible for education or care of a student is knowledgeable of special education disciplinary rules.

A. Removal Up to Ten Days

The principal may order the removal of a special education student from a current placement. The district need not provide services to a student who is removed from the current placement for ten school days or less in any school year, if services are not provided to a student without disabilities.

B. Removal for More than Ten Days

Once a student has been removed from placement for a total of ten school days in the same school year, and if the district determines that the removal is not a change of placement, the district must, during subsequent days of removal, provide appropriate services to the extent necessary to enable the student to participate in the general curriculum, although in another setting, and to progress toward meeting the goals set out in the student’s IEP. The special education director, in consultation with one or more of the student’s teachers, will make the determination of such necessary services.

C. Change in Placement

A change of placement occurs when an eligible student is:

  1. Removed from his or her current placement for more than ten consecutive school days in a school year; or
  2. Subjected to a series of removals in a school year and which constitute a pattern of removal because: 1) the series of removals total more than ten school days in a year; 2) the student behavior is substantially similar to the student’s behavior in previous incidents that resulted in the series of removals; and 3) because of factors such as the length of each removal, the total amount of time a student is removed, and the proximity of the removals to one another.

Whether a pattern of removal constitutes a change in placement is determined on a case-by-case basis by the building principal and special education director and is subject to review through due process and judicial proceedings. The principal will notify the special education director.

D. Manifestation Determination

Within ten school days after the date on which the district makes a decision to change the student’s placement, the district will conduct a manifestation determination meeting to determine the relationship between the student’s disability and the behavior subject to the disciplinary action.

The review of the relationship between a student’s disability and the behavior subject to the disciplinary action will occur at a meeting that includes the parent and relevant members of the IEP team who are selected by the parent and the district. The teacher and principal will contact the parent in order to determine relevant IEP team members and providing notice of the meeting. The team will review all relevant information in the student’s file, including the IEP, teacher observations and information provided by the parent to determine:

  1. If the conduct was caused by or had a direct and substantial relationship to the child’s disability; or
  2. If the conduct in question was the direct result of the district’s failure to implement the student’s IEP.

If the team determines that the behavior resulted from any of the above, the behavior must be considered a manifestation of the student’s disability.

The district will take immediate action to remedy the deficiencies, and will:

  1. Conduct a functional behavioral assessment (unless already completed) and implement a behavioral intervention plan if one is not already in place; or
  2. Review the existing behavioral intervention plan and modify it to address the behavior; and
  3. Return the child to the placement from which he or she was removed from unless the parents and the district agree a change is necessary as part of the behavioral intervention plan, or unless the infraction involves drugs, weapons or serious bodily injury.

E. Special Circumstances

School personnel may order a change in placement to an appropriate interim alternative educational setting for the same amount of time that a student without disabilities would be subject to discipline, but for not more than 45 school days, if a special education student:

  1. Possesses a “dangerous weapon” or carries such a weapon to school or to a school function;
  2. Knowingly possesses or uses “illegal drugs” while at school or a school function;
  3. Sells or solicits the sale of a “controlled substance” while at school or a school function; or
  4. Inflicts serious bodily injury upon another person while at school or a school function. Serious bodily injury means a substantial risk of death, extreme physical pain, protracted and obvious disfigurement or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member, organ or mental faculty.

Any interim alternative educational setting in which the student is placed is determined by the student’s IEP team and will:

  1. Be selected so as to enable the student to participate in the general curriculum, although in another setting and to progress toward meeting the goals set out in the student’s IEP; and
  2. Include services and modifications designed to address the behavior or to prevent the behavior from recurring.

The district may ask an administrative law judge, or seek injunctive relief through a court having jurisdiction of the parties, to order a change in placement to an appropriate interim alternative educational setting for not more than 45 school days or seek injunctive relief through a court having jurisdiction of the parties when the district believes that maintaining the student’s current placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or others. If the student’s IEP team believes that the student may not be maintained in his or her current placement, the IEP team should work with the district’s special education director.

Unless the parent and the district agree otherwise, if a parent requests a hearing to challenge either the manifestation determination or the interim alternative educational setting, the student must remain in the interim alternative educational setting pending the decision of the hearing officer or until the expiration of the 45 day period, whichever occurs first.

D. Basis of Knowledge

A student who has not been determined eligible for special education services may assert the protections if the district had knowledge that the student was an eligible for special education before the behavior that precipitated disciplinary action occurred.

The district is deemed to have knowledge if:

  1. The parent expressed concern in writing (or orally if the parent does not know how to write or has a disability the prevents a written statement) to district supervisory or administrative personnel or a teacher that the student is in need of special education and related services;
  2. The parent requested that the student be evaluated for special education services; or
  3. The teacher or other school personnel has expressed specific concern about a pattern of behavior demonstrated by the student to the director of the special education department or to other supervisory staff.

If instituting disciplinary action that would exceed ten days and the principal believes that one or more of these events applies to the student, the principal will notify the special education department to determine the appropriate disciplinary procedures.

The district is not deemed to have knowledge if, as a result of receiving the information described above, the district either:

  1. Conducted a special education evaluation of the student and determined that the student was not eligible for services; or
  2. The parent of the student has not allowed an evaluation of the child or has refused services.

If the district is not deemed to have knowledge that a student is a student eligible for special education services , the student may be disciplined as a student without disabilities who engages in comparable behaviors. The district will conduct an evaluation, which is requested during the time period such a student is subjected to disciplinary measures, in an expedited manner. Until the evaluation is completed, such a student will remain in the educational placement determined by the district, which can include suspension or expulsion without educational services.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, the district may report a crime committed by a student eligible for special education services to appropriate authorities. In the event of such a report, the district will ensure that copies of the student’s special education and disciplinary records are transmitted for consideration by the appropriate authorities to whom the crime is reported, to the extent transmission of the records is permitted by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

Staff Qualifications

All employees of the district funded in whole or part with state or federal excess special education funds will meet the standards established by the State Board of Education (SBE) and defined in WAC 392-172-A-02090.

All employees will hold such credentials, certificates or permits as are now or hereafter required by the SBE for the particular position of employment and will meet such supplemental standards established by the district.

All special education teachers providing, designing, supervising, evaluating, or monitoring the provision of special education will possess “substantial professional training.” This will be shown by the issuance of an appropriate special education endorsement on an individual teaching certificate issued by the superintendent of public instruction.

In the event a special education teacher does not have a certificate endorsed in special education, a district may apply for a pre-endorsement waiver through the special education section of the OSPI. To qualify for the special education pre-endorsement waiver, the teacher must meet SBE criteria.

If the district must temporarily assign a classroom teacher without a special education endorsement to a special education position, the special education director will document in writing that:

A. The district is unable to recruit a teacher with the proper endorsement who was qualified for the position;
B. The need for a teacher with such an endorsement could not have been reasonably anticipated and the recruitment of such a classroom teacher at the time of assignment was not reasonably practical; and/or
C. The reassignment of another teacher within the district would be unreasonably disruptive to the current assignments of other classroom teachers or would have an adverse effect on the educational program of the students assigned to the other teacher.

If one or more of these criteria can be documented and the district determines that a teacher has the competencies to be an effective special education teacher and the teacher has completed six-semester hours or nine-quarter hours of course work, which are applicable to the special education endorsement, the district can assign the teacher to special education in compliance with the process for making out-of-endorsement assignments and reporting them to the state.

Classified staff will present evidence of skills and knowledge necessary to meet the needs of students with disabilities. The district will provide training to classified staff to meet the state recommended core competencies.

Personnel Development

In order to provide a staff development program to improve the quality of instructional programs, the following procedures will be employed:

  1. Special education concerns will be identified through a staff needs assessment completed by administrators, teachers, educational staff associates, program assistants, parents and volunteers;
  2. All personnel who use restraint, restraint devices and/or isolation must be certified and annually trained in the use of such restraint, restraint devices and/or isolation;
  3. In-service training schedules will be developed based upon the results of the district assessment and in support of needs identified;
  4. Training activities will be conducted for regular general and special education staff, staff of other agencies and organizations and private school staff providing services for students eligible for special education ; and
  5. Training for classified staff in the state recommended core competencies will occur as needed and identified.

Public Participation

Any application and any required policies, procedures, evaluations, plans, and reports are readily available to parents and other members of the public through the district’s special education office and the office of the superintendent. A notice regarding the availability of such documents will be placed on the district’s Web site and in the district’s website.


2162‑Education of Students With Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

It is the intent of the district to ensure that students who are disabled within the definition of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) are identified, evaluated and provided with appropriate educational services. Students may be a qualified disabled person under this law even though they are not eligible for services pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Section 504 is a civil rights law which protects the rights of individuals with disabilities in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education. A child is a “qualified disabled person” under Section 504 if he or she:

A. Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities (such as caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating and working), has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment; and
B. Is between the ages of 3 to 21 years old.

The superintendent or designee will establish procedures to ensure that students who are disabled within the definition of Section 504 are educated in full compliance with the law.

Cross References:
3246 – Restraint, Isolation and Other Uses of Reasonable Force
3210 – Nondiscrimination
2161 – Special Education and Related Services for Eligible Students

Legal References:
42 USC 12101 et seq. Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990
34 CFR Part 104 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
34 CFR Part 99 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
RCW 28A.600.485 Restraint of students—Use of restraint or isolation specified in individualized education programs or plans developed under section 504 of the rehabilitation act of 1973 —Procedures—Summary of incidents of isolation or restraint—Publishing to web site
RCW 28A.600.486 District policy on the use of isolation and restraint—Notice to parents and guardians of children who have individualized education programs or plans developed under section 504 of the rehabilitation act of 1973

Management Resources:
2016 –November Issue
2014 – June Issue
2011 – June Issue

Adoption Date: 12/14/16
Raymond School District #116


2162P‑Procedure Education of Students With Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

A. Free Appropriate Public Education

The district will provide a free appropriate public education to school-age children with disabilities in the district’s jurisdiction.

B. Child Find

The district will annually undertake to identify and locate every qualified disabled student residing in the district’s jurisdiction who is not receiving a public education and take appropriate steps to notify disabled children and their parents or guardians of the district’s responsibilities under Section 504.

C. Equal Educational Opportunity

The district will provide students with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from the educational services it provides to non-disabled students. The teachers of disabled students will meet comparable standards for certification that teachers of non-disabled students meet. Facilities will be of comparable quality and appropriate materials and equipment will be available.

D. Confidentiality of Information

The confidentiality of student records will be maintained throughout the period of time when such records are collected, stored, disclosed or destroyed by the district.

E. Parent Involvement

  1. Initial Evaluation. The district will obtain the consent of parents or guardians before conducting an initial evaluation of a student. The district will notify parents or guardians of the evaluation results.
  2. Initial Placement. The district will notify parents or guardians before initially placing a disabled student.
  3. Significant Change in Placement. The District will notify parents or guardians before implementing a significant change in the student’s placement.
  4. Right to Challenge. The district will notify parents or guardians of their right to review and challenge the district’s program and placement decisions if they disagree with them.
  5. Meetings. Section 504 does not give parents or guardians the right to participate in a meeting during which their child’s program is designed and placement is determined, as does the IDEA. However, this practice is recommended.

F. Participation in the Least Restrictive Environment

  1. Academic setting. To the maximum extent appropriate, the district will educate disabled students with non-disabled students. In order to remove a child from the regular educational environment, the district must demonstrate that education of the student in the regular environment with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the disabled student. Whenever the district places a student in a setting other than the regular education environment, it will take into account the proximity of the alternate setting to the student’s home.
  2. Nonacademic setting. In providing or arranging for the provision of non-academic and extracurricular services and activities, including meals, recess periods and the services and activities, the district will ensure that disabled students participate with non-disabled students in such activities and services to the maximum extent appropriate.

G. Referral and Screening

  1. Referral. If a student, parent or guardian, teacher, counselor or administrator believe they are observing in a student substantially limited performance in one or more major life activities that is believed to be caused by a physical or mental impairment, the concerned individual should complete a referral form, available from, and submitted to, the Special Education director..
  2. Screening. A designated building team will review referrals to determine if an evaluation is appropriate. If an evaluation appears to be necessary, the district will obtain written consent from parents or guardians to perform an evaluation and/or gather additional information and will provide parents with a written statement of their rights under Section 504. If the building team determines that an evaluation is not necessary, it will provide written notice to parents/guardians, and forward the results of the screening to the source of the referral.

H. Evaluations

1. Significant Change in Placement. If a student is believed to be disabled and needs, or is believed to need, special education or related services, the district will evaluate the student prior to placement and before any subsequent “significant change in that placement.” An evaluation need not include formal or written assessments but may involve, in appropriate circumstances, a review and consideration of existing information. Examples of significant changes in placement include:

a. Expulsion;
b. Suspensions which exceed ten consecutive days in a school year;
c. Cumulative short-term suspensions which create a pattern of exclusion;
d. Transferring a student to home instruction; and/or
e. Graduation from high school.

2. Tests and Evaluation Materials. The district will establish procedures for evaluation and placement which assure that tests and other evaluation materials:

a. Have been validated and are administered by trained personnel;
b. Are tailored to assess educational need and are not merely based on IQ scores; and
c. Reflect aptitude or achievement or whatever else the tests purport to measure and do not reflect the student’s impaired sensory, manual or speaking skills (unless the test is designed to measure these particular deficits).

3. Mitigating Measures. The determination of whether a student is substantially limited in one or more major life activities will be made without regard to any ameliorative effects of mitigating measures which include, but are not limited to: medication, medical supplies, equipment, low-vision devices, prosthetics, hearing aids and cochlear implants or other implantable hearing devices, mobility devices, oxygen therapy equipment and supplies, assistive technology, reasonable accommodations, auxiliary aids or services; or learned behavioral or adaptive neurological modifications. However, ameliorative effects of mitigating measures may be relevant as to whether a student needs any specific accommodation or a 504-accommodation plan.

Low vision devices do not include ordinary eyeglasses or contact lenses. The ameliorative effects of ordinary eyeglasses or contact lenses may be considered in determining whether the impairment substantially limits a major life activity.

4. Temporary Impairments. A student with a temporary impairment falls within the scope of Section 504 if the temporary impairment is severe enough that it substantially limits one or more of the student’s major life activities. A temporary impairment is one with an actual or expected duration of six months or less. For example, pregnancy is not generally regarded as a disability under Section 504; however, if a student was put on bed rest or otherwise limited due to pregnancy complications, this would be a temporary impairment that would qualify the student as disabled under Section 504.

A student with an episodic impairment or a disease in remission qualifies as disabled under Section 504 if the impairment would substantially limit a major life activity when active (e.g. a student whose cancer is in remission).

I. Placement Procedures The Section 504 team will convene to review all evaluation results, determine eligibility as a student with a disability under Section 504 and document the meeting in writing. The team composition may vary according to the needs of the student. In interpreting evaluation data and in making placement decisions, the district will (1) draw upon information from a variety of sources, including aptitude and achievement tests, teacher recommendations, physical condition, social or cultural background and adaptive behavior; (2) establish procedures to ensure that information obtained from all such sources is documented and carefully considered; (3) ensure that the placement decision is made by a group of persons, including persons knowledgeable about the student, the meaning of the evaluation data, and the placements options; and (4) ensure that the student is educated with his/her non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate. Parents and guardians of students who have a plan developed under Section 504 will be provided a copy of the district policy (see Policy 3246) on the use of isolation and restraint at the time that the plan is created. If the district affords a free appropriate education to a student but the parent chooses to place the child elsewhere, the district is not responsible to pay for the out-of-district placement.

J. Reevaluations The district will provide for periodic reevaluation of disabled students. No time frame is specified in Section 504; however, reevaluating students every three years in accordance with the requirements of the IDEA will satisfy Section 504 requirements as well. A reevaluation is also required before any “significant change of placement,” as defined above in Part “H.”

K. Programming to Meet Individual Needs The district recognizes that to be appropriate, educational programs for students with disabilities must be designed to meet their individual needs to the same extent that the needs of non-disabled students are met. A documented procedure, such as the development of an individualized accommodation plan by a knowledgeable team of educational professionals, may be appropriate.

L. Non-Academic Services The district will provide nonacademic and extracurricular services and activities in such a manner as is necessary to afford disabled students an equal opportunity for participation in such services and activities. Nonacademic and extracurricular services and activities may include counseling services, physical recreation athletics, transportation, health services, recreational activities, interest groups or clubs sponsored by the district, referrals to agencies which provide assistance to disabled persons and employment of students, including both employment by the district and assistance in making available outside employment. The district will observe reasonable health and safety standards for all students.

  1. Counseling Services. In providing personal, academic or vocational counseling, guidance or placement services to its students, the district will provide these services without discrimination on the basis of disability. The district will ensure that qualified students with disabilities are not counseled toward more restrictive career objectives than are non-disabled students with similar interests and abilities.
  2. Physical Education and Athletics. In providing physical education courses and athletics and similar programs and activities to any of its students, the district will not discriminate on the basis of disability. If the district offers physical education courses and operates or supports interscholastic, club or intramural athletics, it will provide an equal opportunity for qualified students with disabilities to participate in these activities consistent with their abilities and needs.

M. Preschool and Adult Education Programs
 In the operation of preschool education, or day care program or activity, or an adult education program or activity, the district will not, on the basis of disability, exclude qualified students with disabilities from the program or activity and will take into account the needs of such persons in determining the aid, benefits or services to be provided under the program or activity.

N. Disciplinary Exclusion

1. Exclusions. Students with disabilities are protected from being improperly excluded from school for disciplinary reasons. Certain disciplinary exclusions of disabled students from school constitute a significant change in the student’s educational placement. A disciplinary change in the student’s educational placement occurs if the student has been suspended for more than ten consecutive days or if the disciplinary exclusions constitute a “pattern of exclusion” (defined below). Such disciplinary exclusions, which are change of placement, cannot be implemented unless the district first determines that the student’s misconduct which led to the disciplinary exclusion was not a manifestation of the student’s disability.

2. Manifestation Determinations. If a disciplinary exclusion (suspension or expulsion) which constitutes a change in placement is implemented, the school principal or educational staff person responsible for the imposition of discipline must ensure that a group of qualified professionals (the student’s Section 504 team) determine whether or not the misconduct is a manifestation of the student’s disability. The misconduct is considered a manifestation of the disability if the conduct was caused by, or had a direct and substantial relationship to the student’s disability. This manifestation determination will take into account the student’s current evaluation and individualized accommodation plan under Section 504. Under Section 504, there is no obligation to provide educational services during periods of long-term suspension or expulsion when the student’s misconduct has been properly determined not to be disability-related.. However, Washington state law requires the district to provide educational services to all students during a period of suspension or expulsion (See Policy/Procedure 3241). If a student’s misconduct is determined to be a manifestation of his/her disability, procedures in #3 below will be instituted in lieu of either long-term suspension or expulsion.

3. Conduct That Is a Manifestation of a Disability. When a student has engaged in misconduct which is a manifestation of his or her disability, expulsion and/or long term suspension should not be imposed if it would result in a change in educational placement (a disciplinary exclusion from school of over ten consecutive days or exclusions which constitute a pattern of exclusion). Days will be measured cumulatively over the period of the entire school year, with any short-term suspensions as counting toward the cumulative total. When a student’s misconduct is related to a disability, additional evaluations and/or a change of placement should be considered. In this circumstance, the Section 504 team will meet to determine if there is a need for further evaluation or a change of program. If further evaluation is recommended, it will be conducted as soon as reasonably possible.

4. Pattern of Exclusion. Suspension or emergency expulsion of a disabled student may occur, without the need to determine if there is a causal connection with the disability, if the suspension or emergency expulsion is ten consecutive days or less, or if more than ten cumulative days is not a pattern of exclusion. A pattern of exclusion occurs if:

a. The removal is for more than ten school days in a school year; and
b. The student’s behavior is substantially similar to the behavior that he/she was previously removed for.

Additional factors to consider are the length of each removal (the total amount of time the student has been removed, and the proximity of the removals to one another), and the school must determine on a case-by-case basis whether a pattern of removals is significant enough to constitute a change in placement.

5. Right to Challenge. Students and their parent/guardian will be notified of the results of the manifestation decision and of their right under the law to challenge this decision.

6. Drugs or Alcohol. Students who are considered disabled under Section 504 are subject to the same disciplinary processes and results as non-disabled students for misconduct regarding the use, sale or possession of drugs or alcohol at school.

O. Restraint or Isolation Restraint or isolation of students who have a Section 504 plan will be authorized only under the limited circumstances specified in Policy/Procedure 3246 and each incident will require reporting and parent/guardian notification as specified in that policy and procedure.

P. Transportation If the district places a student in a program not operated by the district, the district will assure that adequate transportation to and from the program is provided at no cost to the parent. Because the district provides transportation to all its students within a certain geographic area, it will not discriminate in its provision of transportation to students with disabilities. If the district proposes to terminate a qualified disabled student’s bus transportation for inappropriate bus behavior, the district will first determine the relationship between the student’s behavior and his or her disabling condition. The parent or guardian will be provided with notice of the results of such determinations and of their right to challenge such determinations.

Q. Procedural Requirements
 The district will ensure compliance with the requirements of Section 504 by doing the following:

1. Assurance. Provide written assurance of non-discrimination whenever the district receives federal money;

2. Designation of Employee. Designate an employee to coordinate the district’s Section 504 compliance activities. The Section 504 Coordinator for the district is the Special Education Director;

3. Grievance Procedures. Provide grievance procedures to resolve complaints of discrimination. Students, parents or employees are entitled to file grievances. The grievance procedures for the district are set out in the Procedure for Policy 3210, Nondiscrimination;

4. Notice. Provide notice to students, parents/guardians, employees, unions and professional organizations of the district’s nondiscrimination policy in admission and access to programs and activities, and in treatment and employment. Notice will also specify the Section 504 coordinator for the district;

5. Locate. Annually undertake to identify and locate all Section 504 qualified disabled children in the district’s jurisdiction who are not receiving a public education;

6. Annual Notification. Annually take appropriate steps to notify disabled persons and their parents/guardians of the district’s responsibilities under Section 504; and

7. Procedural Safeguards. Establish and implement procedural safeguards to be provided to parents/guardians with respect to actions regarding the identification, evaluation or educational placement of persons who, because of disability, need, or are believed to need, special instruction or related services. Procedural safeguards will include:

a. Notice of parental/guardian rights;
b. An opportunity for parents/guardians to examine relevant records;
c. An impartial hearing, initiated by either the parents/guardian or the district, with opportunity for participation by the student’s parents/guardians and representation by legal counsel; and
d. A review procedure.

R. Appropriate Funding The district recognizes that the regular education funding of the district is the funding source for serving students who are qualified as disabled under Section 504 only. However, if students are dual identified as Section 504 and IDEA eligible, state and federal special education funds can be used. The district will not use money appropriated by the IDEA to serve students found disabled under Section 504 but not the IDEA. The district may use the IDEA money to evaluate a student if the district believes that the student may also be eligible under the IDEA.

S. Accessibility

  1. Facilities that were constructed prior to June 3, 1977 need not necessarily be made accessible so long as the program or activity, viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to persons with disabilities.
  2. Facility alterations commenced after June 3, 1977, that affect or could affect the facility’s usability must be accomplished so that, to the maximum extent feasible, the altered portion of the facility is readily accessible and usable by persons with disabilities.
  3. A district can redesign equipment, reassign classes or other services to accessible buildings, assign aides to students, deliver services at alternate accessible sites or alter existing facilities. So long as there are other methods which are as effective in achieving compliance, a district need not undertake structural changes to a building.
  4. District recognition of the meaning of the phrase “to the maximum extent feasible.” This provision covers the instance where occasionally the nature of an existing facility is such as to make it impractical or prohibitively expensive to renovate in a manner that results in it being entirely barrier-free. However, in all of these instances, the alteration should provide the maximum amount of physical accessibility feasible.

T. Special Considerations for ADD/ADHD Students

 Section 504 obligations apply to all students with disabilities, including students with attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Under federal guidance, there are three different types of ADHD, which are categorized depending upon which symptoms are the strongest: (1) predominately inattentive type; (2) predominately hyperactive-impulsive type; and (3) combined type (where symptoms of the first two types are equally present). See U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Students with ADHD and Section 504: A Resource Guide (July 2016) (available on the Office for Civil Rights’ website at http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/frontpage/faq/rr/policyguidance/disability.html).

U. Due Process Hearing or Mediation Requests
 Due process hearing or mediation requests must be made directly to the district 504 Compliance Officer.


2165—HOME OR HOSPITAL INSTRUCTION

Upon request from a parent or an adult student, home or hospital instruction shall be provided to students who are unable to attend school for an estimated period of 4 weeks or more because of disability or illness. A written statement from a qualified medical practitioner verifying that the student will not be able to attend school for an estimated period of four weeks or more shall accompany the request. The district shall not pay for any costs incurred in securing the medical verification.

Cross References:
Board Policy 2161 Education of Students with Disabilities
Board Policy 2162 Education of Students with Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

Legal References:
WAC 392-171-486 Placement options–Selection–Required considerations
WAC 392-122-145 State Handicapped Program–Home and Hospital Care

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2165P—HOME OR HOSPITAL INSTRUCTION

Request

The procedures for instituting home/hospital instruction are as follows:

A. Parent completes application form for home/hospital instruction.
B. The district office and family physician complete the SPI E-310 form.
C. Home/hospital instruction shall begin when the family physician signs form SPI E-310.

Role of Instructor

The instructor shall:

A. Contact parents and arrange home/hospital instruction schedule.
B. Discuss with the parent any conditions surrounding the student’s disability or educational development which may have a bearing on the program.
C. Discuss the need for a supervising adult to be in the home during the teacher’s visit.
D. Discuss the need for an appropriate learning environment.

1. Other youngsters and/or adults should remain out of the room while the lesson is in progress.

2. The student should be awake, properly dressed and ready for lessons at the appropriate time.

3. Adequate study time should be scheduled each day, taking into account the physical limitations of the student.

E. Evaluate the students’ work and make a report to the student’s home school.

Termination

Instruction may be terminated in the following manner:

A. The qualified medical practitioner determines the advisability of the student returning to school.
B. Extension of the original instruction period must be requested by the parent or guardian, and verified by the attending qualified medical practitioner.
C. Home/hospital instructor contacts payroll office when student returns to school.

Procedures for Initiating Home/Hospital Instruction

The function of the home/hospital instructor is to provide instructional assistance and serve as a liaison between the student and the school in the following manner:

A. Elementary (emphasizes reading, math and language skills)

  1. Contact school principal.
  2. Contact classroom teacher initially and on a weekly basis.
  3. Obtain current academic standing.
  4. Obtain books, materials and assignments from the homeroom teacher.
  5. Keep parents/guardians informed as to the progress of the student.
  6. Provide a statement to the student’s home school for the cumulative record regarding the grades earned by the student while on home/ hospital instruction. Grading shall be the responsibility of the classroom teacher. This statement is due immediately upon termination of the home/hospital instruction.

B. Middle/Senior High (receives instruction in required subjects)

  1. Contact school counselor and have counselor set up initial meeting with home/hospital instructor and classroom teacher.
  2. Obtain current academic standing.
  3. Contact each classroom teacher on a weekly basis and arrange for books, materials and assignments; also include a class schedule, class outlines, etc., of what the student needs to fulfill credit requirements for quarter, semester and year.
  4. Provide a statement to the student’s home school for the cumulative record regarding the grades earned by the student while on home/ hospital instruction. Grading shall be the responsibility of the classroom teacher. This statement is due immediately upon termination of home/hospital instruction.

If the student is unable to complete regular classroom assignments, the home/ hospital instructor will work with the regular classroom teacher to modify or develop alternative classroom assignments to meet required course work.

Instructor Reimbursement Procedures

A. The week before payroll cut-off date, the payroll office will contact home/hospital instructor advising of the payroll cut-off date for that particular month.

B. When the time sheets and mileage sheets are received by the payroll office, the amounts will be computed and submitted for payment.



2170—CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

The district will provide a program of career and technical education to assist students in making informed and meaningful educational and career choices, and to prepare students for post-secondary options. The district’s career and technical education is a planned program of courses and learning experiences that begins with exploration of career options. Additionally, the district’s career and technical education program supports basic academic and life skills, enables achievement of high academic standards, incorporates leadership training, provides options for high skill development and high-wage employment preparation, and includes advanced and continuing education courses. The district will include the program and its courses as part of the regular curriculum of the district.

The district will establish local career and technical advisory committees to assist in the design and delivery of the district’s career and technical education program. Committees will advise the district on current labor market needs and the programs necessary to meet those needs. The district will relate its career and technical education program to employment demands, current and future, and to the needs and interests of students.

The board will annually review and approve the district plan for the design and delivery of its career and technical education program. The plan will ensure academic rigor, align with education reform, establish program performance targets, address the skill gaps of Washington’s economy, and provide opportunities for dual credit.

The superintendent or designee will develop procedures to ensure that the district operates all programs and courses in conformity with the district’s plan for career and technical education. Further, the associated procedures will conform to all federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination based on race, creed, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, gender identity, disability (including any sensory, mental, physical disability, the use of a trained dog guide, and use of service animal), religion, and honorably discharged veteran or military status. Additionally, the superintendent or designee will seek and utilize all available state and federal sources of revenue for the financial support of career and technical education in the district.

If the district receives funds through the work-integrated learning initiative to provide experiences for its students, it will comply with the conditions of receiving such funds.
Cross References: 2413 – Equivalency Credit for Career and Technical Education Courses
2140 – Guidance and Counseling

Legal References: RCW 28A.150.500 Educational agencies offering vocational educational programs — Local advisory committees — Advice on current job needs
RCW 28A.230.130 Program to help students meet minimum entrance requirements at baccalaureate-granting institutions or to pursue career or other opportunities — High school course offerings for postsecondary credit
Chapter 28A.700 RCW Secondary Career and Technical Education
20 U.S.C. § 2301 et seq. Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006
Laws of 2018, ch. 206, § 1 Work-Integrated Learning Initiative
Management Resources:
2018- May Issue
2011 – June Issue
2009 – February Issue

Adoption Date: 07/26/18
Raymond School District #116


2170P—CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

The district’s plan for its Career and Technical Education program will be approved annually by the board of directors. All components of the plan will meet the Career and Technical Education (CTE) program standards as established by the Office of State Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).

A. The District’s (CTE) Plan:

The district’s CTE Plan describes how the district will deliver career and technical education to its students. The components of the district’s CTE plan will ensure:

  1. Application and contextualization of the related state academic learning standards;
  2. Responsiveness to state-wide or local high-demand occupations;
  3. Compliance with the five-year plan requirements of the federal Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act;
  4. Sufficient equipment and facilities to meet industry standards;
  5. Adequate student and teacher opportunities to connect to the business community including, but not limited to, industry job shadowing, mentorships and internships;
  6. The integration and application of leadership and employability skills;
  7. Instructors connect student learning with work, home and community;
  8. Preparatory programs leading to a certificate or credential that is state or nationally recognized;
  9. Courses are sequential, rigorous and based on an analysis of technical skill attainment;
  10. Performance measures and targets established by the state are met or exceeded;
  11. No discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, disability, gender, sex, sexual orientation including gender expression or identity, the presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal, religion, honorably discharged veteran or military status in any aspect of its CTE Programs;
  12. Reasonable modifications are made to all CTE policies, procedures and practices which are necessary to avoid discriminating against a student based on disability unless the district can demonstrate that such modifications would fundamentally alter the nature of a CTE course or program;
  13. Teachers are CTE certified in the areas in which they instruct; and
  14. Courses are structured so that the maximum number of students per class are determined by the number of training stations, safety factors and individual instruction requirements of the specific skills being developed.

B. Performance Measures and Target – Accountability

The district will adopt performance measures and targets in at least the following areas:

  1. Sufficiency of courses allowing students to earn dual credit for high school and college;
  2. Rates of student participation in, and completion of, high-demand programs; and
  3. Performance measures and targets established by the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, including but not limited to student academic and technical skill attainment, graduation rates, post-graduation employment or enrollment in post-secondary education and other measures and targets as required by the federal Carl D. Perkins Act.

C. Course Equivalencies

Each of the district’s high schools will adopt core academic course equivalencies for high school CTE courses, provided that the CTE course has been reviewed and approved for equivalency credit by a district team appointed by the superintendent or a designee, in accordance with district policy 2413, Equivalency Credit for Career and Technical Educational Courses.

D. Career and Technical Education Programs of Study

A program of study is a sequence of courses that identifies the secondary and post-secondary content that students need to take to ensure that they will have the knowledge and skills needed for a seamless transition to post-secondary options.

The district’s CTE program(s) of study will:

  1. Incorporate secondary CTE academic and elective courses and local graduation requirements as well as post-secondary education elements;
  2. Include coherent and rigorous academic content aligned with state learning standards and relevant career and technical content in a coordinated, nonduplicative progression of courses that are aligned with post-secondary education in a related field;
  3. Include courses aligned with appropriate state academic, industry, leadership and employability standards; and
  4. Lead to industry-recognized credentials, an academic certificate or degree, apprenticeship, employment or certificate at the post-secondary level.

E. Career Guidance and Counseling

Career guidance and counseling programs shall include the exploration of options and opportunities for CTE at the secondary and post-secondary level and exploration of career opportunities in emerging and high-demand programs. (See WSSDA model Policy 2140, Guidance and Counseling)

F. Advisory Committees

  1. Advisory committees will participate in the determination of program goals, and review and evaluate program curricula, equipment and effectiveness.
  2. Advisory committee participants will include representatives of business and labor who reflect the local industry and the community. Members will actively consult with other representatives of business, industry, labor and agriculture.
  3. The superintendent, in consultation with the director of CTE programs, will select members of the advisory committees. Advisory committee members will be approved by the board.

Adoption Date: 08/23/11
Raymond School District #116



2171—SCHOOL TO WORK

VISION

By the year 2000 the district will have school to work programs that benefit all students. The programs will be a basic part of the district’s and state’s reformed education system. The private sector will continue to support innovation and improvement, and will provide a broad range of work-based and work-related experiences for all students. All students will be motivated and engaged in learning the knowledge and skills they will need to succeed in the global economy of the coming century, and to contribute to the stability, prosperity, and pluralist democratic traditions of America.

STRUCTURE

School to work programs shall be integrated with the general education program and career pathways. Developmentally appropriate school to work programs shall be developed and made available to all students at all grade levels as an integrated part of the curriculum. Learning goals and program elements shall be established for each program. To the extent appropriate, the administrative elements of each school to work program shall be standardized or consistent with the other school to work programs.

Necessary staff development shall be provided both to staff with general instructional responsibilities and those developing and implementing school to work programs to assure that the school to work programs are smoothly integrated into the education program.

Resources for safe and relevant work-based and work-related learning experiences shall be developed in cooperation with the community: employers, labor organizations and public and private agencies. The board directs the superintendent to establish procedures for entering into agreements with employers for work-based and work-related experiences that specify the responsibilities of the district and employer, and address issues including work place safety, liability, screening of persons who will have regularly scheduled, unsupervised access to students, transportation and student and parent responsibilities. (Every effort shall be made to structure all work-based and work-related learning experiences to avoid circumstances when employees or agents of a participating employer would have regularly scheduled, unsupervised access to students.)

ACCOUNTABILITY

Student achievement and the effectiveness of each school to work program shall be regularly assessed. The board directs the superintendent to develop procedures for involving teachers, counselors and other appropriate personnel in the evaluation of students for placement in the various school to work programs.

Each school to work program shall have an assessment process for students while they are in the program and at their completion of the program. Each school to work program shall report annually to the board of directors and the board shall review the effectiveness of each program.

Each participant in school to work programs: district staff, students, parents, employers and employers’ workers, have specific responsibilities of which they shall be informed and for which they shall be held accountable.

The board directs the superintendent to develop specific informed consent and medical release documents for students and parents that shall be executed by the student and a parent or guardian whenever a student participates in a school to work program off-campus. The forms developed for each program shall describe the program, delineate the off-campus activities the student will be involved in, provide the location(s) of the off-campus activities, describe who will be responsible for the student’s transportation, outline the student’s responsibilities in the program, consequences for not meeting those responsibilities and give parent or guardian permission for necessary medical services to be provided to the student while off-campus.

Students shall be subject to the district’s discipline policies while traveling to and from and while present at off-campus locations for school to work programs. Violations of student responsibilities may also result in termination from the school to work program. Employers may terminate students from their workplace for violations of workplace rules or regulations or for safety violations.

The board directs the superintendent to develop procedures for the resolution of complaints resulting from off-campus programs, whether from students, parents or employers.

ADVOCACY

The district shall engage in outreach and cooperative efforts with employers, labor organizations, civic organizations and public and private agencies to create community support for and involvement in school to work programs.

Legal References:
P.L. 103-239 School-to-Work Opportunities–Act of 1994

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2178—TRAFFIC SAFETY EDUCATION

The district shall provide traffic safety instruction for eligible students. A fee shall be assessed to cover those costs, except that this fee may be waived or reduced for students whose families, by reason of their low income, would have difficulty paying the full fee. The USDA child nutrition program guidelines shall be used to determine qualification for a waiver or reduction.

The board directs the superintendent to implement procedures dealing with program supervision; curriculum development; student enrollment criteria, including but not limited to grade level of student, age of student and enrollment status of student; student progress; and collection and refunding of student fees, including provisions for accruing money for future traffic safety program needs or refunding students when student fees exceed the unreimbursed cost of the programs; and notice of the availability of fee waivers or reductions.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.220.020 Definitions
RCW 28A.220.040 Fiscal support — Reimbursement to school districts-Enrollment fees—Deposit
RCW 46.20.055 Instruction permit
RCW 46.20.065 Temporary permit
WAC 392-153-010 Definitions
WAC 392-153-020 Traffic Safety Education Endorsement
WAC 392-153-032 Curriculum Guide and Course Requirements
WAC 392-153-035 Course Scheduling Requirements
WAC 392-153-040 Administration

Adoption Date: 10/25/07
Raymond School District #116



2178P—TRAFFIC SAFETY EDUCATION

The following procedures shall be in effect:

A. The superintendent shall designate a staff member in charge of the district’s traffic safety education program. The program supervisor shall ensure that the district’s traffic safety education program receives annual approval from OSPI.

B. For instructional purposes, the traffic safety education instructor shall use the district’s instructional materials for traffic safety education.

C. Each student enrolled in a traffic safety program shall meet the objectives and competencies listed in the district curriculum as a condition of successful completion of the program.

D. Traffic safety education courses provided by the district shall be conducted during daylight hours (may be extended to no later than 5:00 p.m. during winter months) except that night driving experiences may be provided.

E. Recognizing that the district can serve a limited number of students each year, certain enrollment criteria are established. Students enrolled in private schools, home schooled children and students who have received a certificate of educational competence (GED) shall have equal access to enroll as part-time students. Enrollment criteria in descending order of priority are (a) grade level in school (12th grade — highest), (b) date and time of registration.

F. Students must have a valid drivers permit on the first day of class or within seven days of the first class. Students enrolled in traffic safety during the regular school year must reside in the district or be students who have been released by another district to attend school or e registered for home schooling in this district.

G. The fee for traffic safety education will be set by the district. Each student will be required to pay the established fee at the time of enrollment.

H. Students who have attended more than 50% of the program’s scheduled classes and have completed at least 90% of the program’s objectives, but have not completed all program objectives, shall receive an “incomplete” and shall be provided the opportunity to achieve successfully all objectives during the current school year and ensuing summer. Students failing to do so will receive a failing grade.

I. Students who receive a failing grade or have dropped from a program shall pay an additional fee when re-entering the program.

J. Students transferring from the district prior to attending 50% of the program’s scheduled classes shall be reimbursed the collected fee.

K. Students entering the program from another district shall pay the regularly assessed fee if the transferring district indicates the student had attended less than 50% of the program’s scheduled classes in that district.

Adoption Date: 10/25/07
Raymond School District #116



2180—PARENT, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

VISION

Students master academic skills and develop civic responsibility, because of family, school and community support enhanced by school partnerships with parents, families and community organizations that enable parents to:

  1. understand their children’s school experience;
  2. participate as volunteers in school;
  3. support student learning at home;
  4. develop effective parenting skills;
  5. participate in important decisions affecting their children; and
  6. rely on community resources to support their parenting efforts.

STRUCTURE

A. Building Level: Parent and Community Partnership Plans

Each school and the families and community it serves is different. Therefore, each school must have its own approach to parent and community partnerships. Working together staff and parents at each school shall develop a three-year plan to achieve the following goals:

  1. Multiple techniques assure that (a) all parents understand their children’s school experience and (b) the school staff understands parents’ and community expectations for the school.
  2. School staff work with parent and community volunteers in the school in ways that are beneficial to students and that strengthen school and community relations.
  3. Families receive information about how to support their children’s learning at home and will have access to someone to advise them when they encounter difficulty.
  4. All staff members are able to refer parents to resources for assistance in developing their parenting skills, or to obtain advice on family financial, health or welfare issues. Connections are maintained with community resources and agencies to assure current information and continuous cooperation.
  5. Representatives of parents and the community served by the school have a full and equal role in the school’s student learning improvement team. All parents have the opportunity to review and advise on their student’s learning experiences.
  6. Collaborations and exchanges are established with businesses and agencies in the community to broaden the learning opportunities for students and expand options for teachers.
  7. Each school’s Family and Community Partnership plan shall include a timeline for implementation, success indicators, evaluation procedures, and a system for reporting to the community and the school district. When a parent is unavailable to fulfill the parent’s role, reasonable efforts will be made to identify an adult, acceptable to the family, to act as a communicator and supporter for the student’s education.

B. District Level: Expectations, Support and Resources

The success of each school’s plan depends upon its appropriateness to the school’s service area. Just as those plans must meet the expectations of this policy, they must have the support of the district. The district shall develop a three year plan to achieve the following goals:

  1. In-service training enables teachers and administrators to perfect their skills in working with parents and families as partners in students’ learning.
  2. Financial and staff resources are allocated to assist and support the implementation of individual school plans.
  3. When hiring and promoting personnel, consideration is given to experience and performance in developing effective parent, family and community partnerships.
  4. Family resource centers are developed by the district in partnership with individual schools or other community organizations to support the development of parenting skills, including helping parents to develop the capacity to support students’ learning at home.
  5. Partnerships with other units of government and public and private social, health, welfare and fraternal agencies are developed to create a community support system to strengthen families’ ability to guide the academic and character development of their children.

ACCOUNTABILITY

A. An information system shall be developed to enable the district to assess progress toward its Parent, Family and Community Partnership goals. Using the information reported to it, the board shall review progress each year toward the policy’s goals reported by each school and the district.

B. Subject to legal and contract requirements, criteria shall be included in personnel performance reviews to assess the effectiveness of district personnel in carrying out their role in Parent, Family and Community Partnerships.

ADVOCACY

A. Each year the Board shall focus the community’s attention on Parent, Family and Community partnerships by reviewing progress toward the district’s goals and hosting a community forum to promote discussion among school, parent and community leaders about how they can continue to work together to support the academic and civic development of students.

B. The Board shall use polling, community meetings and participation in the meetings of other organizations to (1) understand public expectations for the schools and (2) explain the school’s work in strengthening parents’ and families’ ability to support students’ academic and civic development.

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2190—HIGHLY CAPABLE PROGRAMS

In order to develop the special abilities of each student, the district will offer a highly capable program that provides kindergarten through twelfth grade students who are selected for the program with access to basic education programs that accelerate learning and enhance instruction. The framework for such programs will encompass, but not be limited to, the following objectives:

A. Expansion of academic attainments and intellectual skills;

B. Stimulation of intellectual curiosity, independence, and responsibility;

C. Development of a positive attitude toward self and others; and

D. Development of originality and creativity.

The board will annually approve the district’s highly capable plan including: the number of students the district expects to serve by grade level; the district’s plan to identify students; a description of the highly capable program goals; a description of the services the program will offer; an instructional program description; a description of ongoing professional development for highly capable program and general education staff; program evaluation and fiscal report; and assurances that the district is legally compliant.

The superintendent will establish procedures consistent with state guidelines for referral, assessment, and selection of children of demonstrated achievement or potential ability in terms of general intellectual ability, academic aptitude, and creative or productive thinking. These include prioritizing equitable identification of low-income students; use of multiple objective criteria and multiple pathways for identification; use of local norms, unless more restrictive than national norms; use of subjective measures only to support identification; and use of screening and assessment in the student’s native language (if available) or nonverbal assessment.

Legal References: RCW 28A.185.030 Programs — Authority of local school districts — Selection of students
WAC 392-170 Special service program — Highly capable students

Management Resources: 2018 – August Issue
2013 – September Issue
Policy News, April 2008 Highly Capable Programs

Adoption Date: 12-18-18
Revised Dates: 04.08; 12.11; 09.13, 08.18



2190P—Highly Capable Programs

Definition
Highly capable students are students who perform or show potential for performing at significantly advanced academic levels when compared with others of their age, experiences, or environments. Highly capable students exhibit outstanding abilities within their general intellectual aptitudes, specific academic abilities, and/or creative productivities within a specific domain. These students are present both in the general populace and within all protected classes.

Students who are highly capable may possess, but are not limited to, these learning characteristics:

1. Capacity to learn with unusual depth of understanding, to retain what has been learned, and to transfer learning to new situations;

2. Capacity and willingness to deal with increasing levels of abstraction and complexity earlier than other peers;

3. Creative ability to make unusual connections among ideas and concepts;

4. Ability to learn quickly in their area(s) of intellectual strength; and

5. Capacity for intense concentration and/or focus.

The district will employ the following procedures to refer, assess, and select students to participate in the program:

Referral
The district accepts referrals based on data or evidence from teachers, other staff, parents, students, and members of the community. Persons referring a student for consideration for admission into the program will use the district’s referral form.

Screening (Omit if no screening procedure is completed.)
The district will screen each referred student to identify students who qualify for further assessment. Screening criteria may include the following: standardized test results and standard psychological assessments of cognitive and/or creative abilities.

Assessment
The district will obtain written or electronic parental permission prior to conducting assessments to determine eligibility for participation in its Highly Capable Program (HCP).

NOTE: District practices for identifying the most highly capable students must prioritize equitable identification of low-income students.

The district will assess students identified for further testing through the screening process using multiple objective criteria. The district must base the assessment process upon a review of each referred student’s capability as shown by multiple criteria, from a wide variety of sources and data, intended to reveal each referred student’s unique needs and capabilities. The assessment criterion consists of both qualitative and quantitative instruments; the district may select one or both.

The district must have identification procedures for their highly capable programs that are clearly stated and implemented by the district using the following criteria:

a) Districts must use multiple objective criteria to identify students who are among the most highly capable. Multiple pathways for qualifications must be available and no single criterion may disqualify a student from identification;
(b) The district must base highly capable selection decisions on consideration of criteria benchmarked on local norms, but the district will not use local norms as a more restrictive criterion than national norms at the same percentile.
(c) The district will not use subjective measures, such as teacher recommendations or report card grades to screen out a student from assessment or to disqualify a student from identification. However, the district may use these data points alongside other criteria during selection to support identification; and
(d) To the extent practicable, the district must give screening and assessments in the native language of the student. If native language screening and assessments are not available, the district must use a nonverbal screening and assessment.
The district will record test results in the student’s cumulative file.

Selection
A multi-disciplinary selection team composed of a district administrator, psychologist, or other individual who can interpret cognitive and achievement test results, and a teacher will review data that has been collected for each of the referred students. The multi-disciplinary selection committee is composed of: a special teacher (however, if a special teacher is not available, a classroom teacher shall be appointed); a psychologist or other qualified practitioner with the training to interpret cognitive and achievement test results; a certified coordinator or administrator with the responsibility for the supervision of the district’s highly capable program; and additional professionals if any, that the district deems desirable.

The multi-disciplinary selection committee will evaluate individual student assessment profile data and make the selection decision based on:

1. A preponderance of evidence from the profile data demonstrating that a student is among the most highly capable;

2. Evidence of clear need for highly capable services; and

3. Determination of which students would benefit the most from inclusion in the district’s program.

A single assessment score or indicator will not prevent a student’s selection for the HCP; however, individual pieces of evidence, if strong enough, can indicate that the student would benefit from these services. If properly validated test are not available, the professional judgment of the qualified district personnel shall determine eligibility of the student based upon evidence of cognitive and/or academic achievement.

The district will:

A. Notify parents of the students selected. Parents will receive a full explanation of the procedures for identification, an explanation of the process to exit a student from the program, the information on the district’s program, and the options that are available to identified students.

B. Obtain parental permission to place identified students in the program before any special services and programs are provided to the student.

Process for Appeal
Parents/legal guardians have the right to appeal the Multi-Disciplinary Selection Committee’s decision. Individuals appealing the selection committee’s decision must submit a completed appeals form or letter requesting review of selection/placement decision. The written request must include reasons for the appeal and, to support reconsideration, provide additional evidence of significantly advanced cognitive or academic levels and/or outstanding intellectual, academic, or creative abilities.

Parents/ legal guardians must submit the appeal request and supporting evidence to the principal within 5 school days of the Multi-Disciplinary Selection Committee’s decision notification.

The district’s appeals committee will review the student’s file, assessment profile data, and additional evidence provided in the request for appeal. The Appeals Committee is composed of: at least one teacher who is familiar with the students’ characteristics, the school psychologist and the principal.

The decision of the appeals may include:

• Upholding the original decision of the Multidisciplinary Selection Committee;
• Reversing the decision of the Multidisciplinary Selection Committee;

The Appeals Committee will make a decision within 5 school days after receipt of written request for reconsideration, and will notify the parent/legal guardian of the decision in writing. The decision of the Appeals Committee is the final decision.

Exit Process
Upon the request of a teacher or a highly capable program administrator, the district may initiate the exit process for students who no longer demonstrate a need for highly capable program services. The Multi-Disciplinary Selection Committee will convene a meeting to review the student’s profile to determine if the student qualifies for program services based on assessment data and selection criteria. The multi-disciplinary selection committee may request additional evidence of student capabilities and/or willingness to participate in the program. If the committee determines that the student no longer qualifies for highly capable program services, it may recommend that the student be exited from the program. The district will notify the parent in writing of the committee’s decision and of the appeal’s process.

A parent/legal guardian may request to withdraw the student from the program or a student may voluntarily withdraw from the program. A meeting will be convened by the Highly Capable Program Coordinator/Director to discuss the request. If the parent/legal guardian desires to withdraw the student from the program, the district will exit the student from the program. The multi-disciplinary selection committee will determine if identification procedures are necessary for students wishing to reenter the program in the future.

Program Design
The district will make a variety of appropriate program services to students who participate in the program. Once services are started, the district will provide a continuum of services to identified students in grades K-12. The district will keep on file a description of the educational programs provided for identified students. The district reviews services (insert district timeframe) for each student to ensure that the services are appropriate.

The district will offer highly capable students the following programs: (Describe the district’s grades K-12 programs and services. Options include but are not limited to: accelerated learning opportunities; academic grouping arrangements that provide intellectual and interest peer group interactions; cooperative agreements between K-12 and institutions of higher education and programs designed to share resources and facilities to maximize student learning and mentorships and career exploration.)

Reporting
Identified students will be assigned the appropriate CEDARS Gifted value(s) in the district’s student information system for the end-of-year reporting activities.

The superintendent or designee will provide an end-of-the-year report to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) that includes

• Number of students served by grade level K-12
• Student demographic information
• Data to determine if students who are highly capable met the goals set and if the programs provided met the academic needs of these students;
• Number and content of professional development activities provided for special teachers and general education staff; and
• Program evaluation data and, if needed, program changes that will be made based upon this information.



2210—GRADE ORGANIZATION

Instructional programs shall be coordinated between each grade and between levels of schools. Grade organization may vary among the schools as individual schools and communities use shared-decision making in recommending to the Board their preferred grade organization. The Board will make the final decision to assure smooth transitions between the various buildings as students progress.

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2220—SCHOOL CALENDAR

In order to permit staff, students and parents to make plans for their own work and vacation schedules, the board will adopt a school calendar or calendars by June 1 of each year. Multiple calendars may be developed where some schools are on modified school calendars for the forthcoming school year. Following board action, staff, students, parents and patrons will be advised of the school calendar(s).

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.203 School year — Beginning — End
28A.150.220 Basic Education Act — Definitions — Program requirements— Program accessibility — Rules and regulations
28A.330.100(7) Additional powers of board

Adoption Date: 08/21/12
Raymond School District #116



2220P—SCHOOL CALENDAR

By March 1, the superintendent will prepare several possible calendars for study purposes. These calendars will be reviewed with principals. Each will explain the options available to their staff members. Staff will be asked to express their preference through an advisory ballot.

Parents will also be advised through the district newsletter of the possible calendars under study for the following year. They will be encouraged to express their opinions. Results of these surveys will be presented to the board at its April meeting. The board shall be asked to adopt a calendar or calendars at the May meeting.



2240—SUMMER SCHOOL

The district’s summer program of instructional offerings shall be for the purposes of remediation and enrichment. Fees shall be charged to cover costs for which revenues are not otherwise provided. To the extent that the district can absorb the cost, fees may be waived or reduced for students whose families would have difficulty paying the full fee. The USDA Child Nutrition Program guidelines shall be used to determine qualifications for waivers or reductions. Priority in fee waivers and reductions shall be given to remediation courses. Parents shall be informed of the availability of any fee waivers or reductions in the notice of the summer school program.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.500 Summer and/or other student vacation period programs-Authorized–Tuition and fees
RCW 28A.320.510 Night schools, summer schools, meetings, use of facilities for

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2255‑Alternative Learning Experience Courses

The board authorizes the creation of alternative learning experience (ALE) courses, as defined in the procedure which accompanies this policy.

The district will make available to students enrolled in an ALE courses educational opportunities designed to meet their individual needs. The district will comply with all program requirements necessary to count an ALE as a course of study and ensure state funding for ALE students.

ALE programs may include the following types of courses as defined in RCW 28A.232.010:

A. Online courses (See Policy 2024, Online Learning);

B. Remote courses; and

C. Site-based courses.

The board will adopt and annually review written policies authorizing ALE courses, including each ALE course and course provider. The policy must designate, by title, one or more school district official(s) responsible for overseeing the district’s ALE courses.

The district establishes the following alternative courses(s) provided on site or over the internet or by other electronic means, as defined in WAC 392-121-182:

Columbia Virtual Academy, will all associated courses for those grade bands taught in the RSD.

The school district official(s) responsible for overseeing this program is the Superintendent.

Reporting Requirements

A. Annual Report to the Board of Directors

The school district official responsible for overseeing each ALE course will report at least annually to the board. This annual report will include at least the following:

  1. Documentation of ALE student headcount and full-time equivalent enrollment claimed for basic education funding;
  2. Identification of the overall ratio of certificated instructional staff to full-time equivalent students enrolled in each ALE course; the number of certificated staff in each ALE course;
  3. A description of how the course supports the district’s overall goals and objectives for student academic achievement; and
  4. Results of any self-evaluations.

B. Monthly Report to the Superintendent of Public Instruction

The district must report monthly to the Superintendent of Public Instruction:

  1. Accurate monthly headcount and full-time equivalent enrollment for students enrolled in alternative learning experiences; and
  2. Information about the resident and serving districts of such students.

C. Annual Report to the Superintendent of Public Instruction

The district must submit an annual report to the Superintendent of Public Instruction detailing the costs and purposes of any expenditures made to purchase or contract for instructional or co-curricular experiences and services that are included in an ALE written student learning plan, along with the substantially similar experiences or services made available to students enrolled in the district’s regular instructional program.

D. Annual Report to the Superintendent of Public Instruction

The district must report annually to the Superintendent of Public Instruction:

  1. the number of certificated instructional staff full-time equivalent assigned to each alternative learning experience program; and
  2. enrollment of students (separately identified) where ALE instruction is provided entirely under contract pursuant to RCW 28A.150.305 and WAC 392-121-188.

Assessment Requirements:

All students enrolled in alternative learning experience courses or course work must be assessed at least annually, using, for full-time students, the state assessment for the student’s grade level and using any other annual assessments required by the district.

Part-time students must also be assessed at least annually. However, part-time students who are either receiving home-based instruction under Chapter 28A.200, RCW or who are enrolled in an approved private school under Chapter 28A.195, RCW are not required to participate in the assessments required under Chapter 28A.655, RCW.

Any student whose alternative learning experience enrollment is claimed as greater than 0.8 full-time equivalent in any one month through the January count date must be included by the district in any required state or federal accountability reporting for that school year, subject to existing state and federal accountability rules and procedures.

Students enrolled in nonresident district alternative learning experience courses or course work who are unable to participate in required annual state assessments at the nonresident district must have the opportunity to participate in such required annual state assessments at the district of physical residence, subject to that district’s planned testing schedule. It is the responsibility of the nonresident enrolling district to establish a written agreement with the district of physical residence that facilitates all necessary coordination between the districts and with the student and, where appropriate, the student’s parent(s) to fulfill this requirement. Such coordination may include:

  1. arranging for appropriate assessment materials;
  2. notifying the student of assessment administration schedules;
  3. arranging for the forwarding of completed assessment materials to the enrolling district for submission for scoring and reporting; and
  4. arranging for any allowable testing accommodations, and other steps as may be necessary.

The agreement may include rates and terms for payment of reasonable fees by the enrolling district to the district of physical residence to cover costs associated with planning for and administering the assessments to students not enrolled in the district of physical residence. Assessment results for students assessed according to these provisions must be included in the enrolling district’s accountability measurements, and not in the district of physical residence’s accountability measurements.

Students who drop out of ALE courses

A school district offering or contracting to offer an alternative learning experience course to a nonresident student must inform the resident school district if the student drops out of the course or is otherwise no longer enrolled.

Procedures

The superintendent is directed to develop procedures consistent with WAC 392-121-182 to govern the administration of the district’s ALE courses.

Cross References:
2020 – Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials
2024 – Online Learning

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.305 Alternative educational service providers — Student eligibility.
RCW 28A.232.010 Alternative learning experience courses — Generally — Rules — Reports.
RCW 28A.250.050 Student access to online courses and online learning programs — Policies and procedures — Course credit — Dissemination of information — Development of local or regional online learning programs.
WAC 392-121-107 Definition-Course of study
WAC 392-121-182 Alternative learning experience requirements
WAC 392-121-188 Instruction provided under contract

Management Resources:
2017 – April Issue
2014 – February Issue
2012 – October Issue
2011 – October Issue

Adoption Date: 6/15/17
Raymond School District #116



2255P‑ Alternative Learning Experience Courses

Definitions

Alternative learning experience (ALE) means a course or, for grades kindergarten through eight, grade-level course work, that is a delivery method of basic education and:

  1. Is provided in whole or in part independently from a regular classroom setting or schedule, but may include components of direct instruction;
  2. Are supervised, monitored, assessed, evaluated and documented by a certificated teacher employed or contracted by the school district.
  3. Are provided in accordance with a written student learning plan that is implemented pursuant to the district’s policy and Chapter 392-121, WAC

Online courses are courses or grade-level coursework where:

  1. More than half of the course content is delivered electronically using the internet or other computer-based methods;
  2. More than half of the teaching is conducted from a remote location through an online course learning management system or other online or electronic tools;
  3. A certificated teacher has the primary responsibility for the student’s instructional interaction. Instructional interaction between the teacher and the student includes, but is not limited to, direct instruction, review of assignments, assessment, testing, progress monitoring, and educational facilitation; and
  4. Students have access to the teacher synchronously, asynchronously, or both.

C. Remote course means an alternative learning experience course or course work that is not an online course where the student has in-person instructional contact time for less than twenty percent of the total weekly time for the course.

D. Site-based course means an alternative learning experience course or course work that is not an online course where the written student-learning plan for the course includes a requirement for in-person instructional contact time.

Student Eligibility

ALE courses will be available to all students, including students with disabilities.

All students in grades are eligible to participate in ALE programs.

Student Performance

Students participating in ALE will be evaluated monthly by a certificated instructional staff, or, for students whose written student learning plans include only online classes, school-based support staff, to track student progress toward completion and to establish whether an intervention plan should be developed, in accordance with WAC 392-121-182.

A. The methods for determining satisfactory progress shall be outlined in the written student learning plan and may include:

  1. Progress grades;
  2. Assignment completion rates;
  3. Non-academic factors such as attendance, attitude, and behavior; and
  4. Local school expectations.

Student Responsibilities

A. Students enrolled in an ALE program must meet the contact requirements defined in WAC 392-121-182.

B. Follow all CVA-Raymond attendance requirements.

Parent Responsibilities

A. Upon receipt of the district’s description of the difference between home-based instruction and ALE, the parent must sign documentation attesting that he/she understands the difference.

B. Comply with all CVA procedures

District Verification of Student Work


The district will use reliable methods to verify a student is doing his or her own work.  These include, but are not limited to:

A. Proctored examinations;

B. Proctored projects;

C. In-person presentations; or

D. Real-time presentations using videoconference technology.

Review Date: 05/25/17
Raymond School District #116



2320—FIELD TRIPS, EXCURSIONS AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION

The board recognizes that field trips when used as a device for teaching and learning integral to the curriculum are an educationally sound and important ingredient in the instructional program of the schools. Such trips can supplement and enrich classroom procedures by providing learning experiences in an environment beyond the classroom.

Field trips which take students out of the state or are planned to keep students out of the district overnight must be approved in advance by the board. Outdoor education resident school plans shall be presented to the board for annual approval. The superintendent has the authority to approve all other field trips.

The superintendent shall develop procedures for the operation of a field trip or an outdoor education activity which shall insure that the safety of the student shall be protected and that parent permission is obtained before the student leaves the school. Each field trip must be integrated with the curriculum and coordinated with classroom activities which enhance its usefulness. Private vehicles may be used to transport students if approval is obtained in advance from the principal.

No staff member may solicit students for any privately arranged field trip or excursion without board permission.

Cross References:
Board Policy 8131 Private Vehicle Transportation
Board Policy 3520 Student Fees, Fines, Charges

Legal References:
RCW 28A.330.100(5) Additional powers of board
67.20.020 Parks, bathing beaches, public camps–Contracts for cooperation
WAC 181-87-090 Improper remunerative conduct

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2320P—FIELD TRIPS, EXCURSIONS, AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION

Field trips are defined as travel away from school premises, under the supervision of a teacher, with an approved course of study, for the purpose of affording students a direct learning experience not available in the classroom. The transportation costs for all such field trips conducted during school hours shall be borne by the district. The following procedures shall apply:

Field Trips

A. Each school shall receive a field trip allocation.

B. The staff member shall submit a completed field trip request form to the principal at least two weeks prior to the field trip.

C. The staff member shall contact the site to make specific arrangements for the field trip so that the desired activity can be coordinated with the classroom studies.

D. The staff member shall be responsible for securing additional adult supervision for the trip (one adult to a maximum of ten students).

E. If private vehicles are used, field trip forms shall be completed which acknowledge the name of the driver of each vehicle to be used. The principal will contact the district office to determine if the district’s liability insurance coverage will protect the driver.

F. Each student participating in a field trip must first return a permission slip signed by his/her parent. Parents shall be informed if private vehicles are to be used for the field trip.

G. A letter of appreciation should be sent to the site host upon completion of the field trip.

Outdoor Education

A. The outdoor education plans for the coming school year shall be presented to the board for approval at the May board meeting.

B. All staff to be involved shall be notified of plans after board approval.

C. The proposed curricula for the outdoor education school shall be presented to teachers at least one month prior to the session.

D. Information to parents regarding fees and waivers or reductions if offered, special clothing, dates, supervising proposed activities, and other duties shall be sent to parents at least one month prior to the session. The parent must sign an approval form.

E. If feasible, parents may opt to have their child participate in daytime activities only.

F. Students who do not elect to attend shall engage in meaningful learning experiences at school.

G. Students must purchase accident insurance or have family accident insurance.

H. If the district can absorb the cost or has access to funds to cover waivers or reductions, students who are unable to pay the fee may be granted a waiver or reduction if they meet the USDA Child Nutrition Program guidelines.

Overnight Field Trips

A. The staff member must submit to the principal a written plan, including purpose, supervision, itinerary, cost, housing, and student costs (if any) at least two weeks prior to submission to the board.

B. After approval by the principal, the proposal should be submitted to the superintendent at least one week prior to the board meeting.

C. The staff member should attend the board meeting to answer any questions the board may have.

D. After approval by the board, a written description of the overnight field trip shall be sent to the parent. All such field trips are optional. Parent permission is required.

International Travel

Approval of international travel shall be subject to the United States Department of State travel warnings. Travel warnings are issued when the state department decides, based on all relevant information, to recommend that Americans avoid travel to a certain country. District travel to Canada and Mexico will be approved unless either country is identified through a travel warning. No district sponsored international travel will be approved to any other country as long as the worldwide caution is in effect.

A. The staff member must submit to the principal a written request for approval, including purpose, supervision, itinerary, cost, housing, and student costs six months before the date of the trip and before any fundraising begins or deposits are place for the trip.

B. After approval by the principal, all requests for both single and multi-school trips shall be approved by the superintendent at least one week prior to the board meeting.

C. The staff member should attend the board meeting to answer any questions from the board.

D. After approval by the board, a written description of the international, overnight field trip shall be sent to the parent. All such international trips are optional. Parent permission is required.

E. All signed approval forms and trip records shall be kept on file at the school.

F. Staff members and sponsors shall obtain competitive pricing to assure maximum student participation at the lowest possible cost.

Adoption Date: 9/28/04
Raymond School District #116



2331—CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES/GUEST SPEAKERS

The district shall offer courses of study which will afford learning experiences appropriate to the level of student understanding. The instructional program shall respect the right of students to face issues, to have free access to information, to study under teachers in situations free from prejudice and to form, hold, and express their own opinions without personal prejudice or discrimination. The district encourages staff members to provide for the free and orderly flow and examination of ideas so that students may gain the skills to gather and arrange facts, discriminate between facts and opinion, discuss differing viewpoints, analyze problems and draw their own tentative conclusions.

Teachers shall guide discussions and procedures, including the use of guest speakers to gain divergent points of view, with thoroughness and objectivity to acquaint students with the need to recognize opposing viewpoints, the importance of fact, the value of judgment and the virtue of respect for conflicting opinions. Teachers will exercise professional judgment in determining the appropriateness of the issue to the curriculum and the maturity of the students. When in doubt regarding appropriateness, the matter should be referred to the principal.

The superintendent shall establish procedures for the approval of the use of a guest speaker. When an invited speaker expresses opinions, which are partisan or considered controversial by a large portion of the community, the school shall provide for the presentation of opposing views.

A. If the teacher and the principal believe the guest speaker’s topic is controversial, they will develop a plan whereby the issue(s) can be presented in an objective unbiased manner.

B. In the event the speaker’s topic is determined to be controversial, the teacher will notify students beforehand that any student who does not wish to attend the presentation may have alternative assignment.

Adoption Date: 10/29/97
Raymond School District #116



2333—FLAG EXERCISES

Flag exercises shall be conducted in each classroom at the beginning of the school day and at the opening of all school assemblies. Students not reciting the pledge of allegiance shall maintain a respectful silence, while either seated or standing. When feasible, the salute to the flag or the national anthem shall be rendered immediately preceding Interschool events.

The United States flag shall be displayed upon or near every public school plant, except during inclement weather.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.230.140 United States flag–Procurement, display, exercises–National Anthem–Noncompliance, penalty

Adoption Date: 11/27/01
Raymond School District #116



2336—REQUIRED OBSERVANCES (VETERANS DAY, CONSTITUTION DAY, TEMPERANCE AND GOOD CITIZENSHIP DAY, DISABILITY HISTORY MONTH)

Principals will be responsible for the preparation and presentation of educational activities of approximately sixty minutes in duration in observance of Veteran’s Day. The program will be conducted during the school week preceding the eleventh day of November of each year.

Constitution Day will be observed each year on September 17 in commemoration of the September 17, 1787, signing of the United States Constitution. If September 17 occurs on a non-school day, Constitution Day will be conducted on the preceding Friday.

Temperance and Good Citizenship Day will be observed on January 16 or, if on a non-school day, on the Friday preceding January 16. On that day, the social studies teachers must, as resources allow, coordinate a voter registration event in each history or social studies class attended by high school seniors.

Disability History Month will be observed during the month of October by conducting or promoting educational activities such as school assemblies or guest speaker presentations that provide instruction, awareness and understanding of disability history and people with disabilities.

Legal References: RCW 28A.230.160 Educational activities in observance of Veterans’ Day
RCW 28A.230.158 Disability history month — Activities
RCW 28A.230.150 Temperance and Good Citizenship Day — Aids in programming
36 U.S.C. § 106 Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

Management Resources:
2018 – May Issue
2014 – February Issue
Policy News, August 2006 Constitution Day Recognition

Adoption Date: 7/26/18
Raymond School District #116



2337—DISABILITY HISTORY MONTH

The purpose of observing Disability History Month is to encourage students to respect individuals with disabilities rather than pity them, to focus on their strengths and to promote understanding rather than stereotypes. Students will be encouraged to recognize the whole person rather than just an individual’s disability.

While observing Disability History Month as required by law during the month of October, and year-round when feasible, the district will conduct a variety of educational activities of its choice designed to foster greater awareness and understanding of individuals with disabilities. The activities may include, but are not limited to, school assemblies, guest speaker presentations, research and writing projects, book studies, art projects and/or film studies. At a minimum, all activities should provide students with the opportunity to learn how people with disabilities have been treated throughout history, how they have been instrumental in changing history and/or how they became active participants in changing societal attitudes about their needs, desires and capabilities.

Suggested topics for activities include:

  • Examination of common word usage that stigmatizes people with disabilities;
  • Biographical study of important people throughout history who have or had disabilities (e.g., Muhammad Ali, Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Tubman, Lewis Carroll, Michael Phelps, Ludwig Van Beethoven, Michael J. Fox, Franklin Delano Roosevelt);
  • Study of the history of the disability civil rights movement;
  • Presentations by adults with disabilities in the community, including veterans with disabilities;
  • Discussion of disability etiquette;
  • Focus on community-based resources for people with disabilities, or the need therefor;
  • Volunteering for community service organizations that work with people with disabilities;
  • Study of art/music/film that tells the story of a person with a disability or examines the portrayal of people with disabilities;
  • Study of a particular historical period focusing on the experience of persons with disabilities.

The Superintendent will develop procedures for building-specific activities to observe Disability History Month.

Cross References:
Policy 2336 – Required Observances (Veterans Day, Constitution Day, Temperance and Good Citizenship Day, Disability History Month

Legal References:
RCW 28A.230.158 Disability history month — Activities.

Management Resources:
2014 – August Issue
Website: Disability Rights Galaxy
Website: Washington State Disability History Month

Adoption Date: 10/23/14
Raymond School District #116



2340—RELIGIOUS-RELATED ACTIVITIES AND PRACTICES

The board recognizes that views and opinions regarding the relationship of the schools and religion are diverse. While community opinions are important in shaping policy, the board must give primary credence to the United States and Washington state constitutions, state law and the decisions made by the respective courts when establishing guidelines for making decisions regarding religious-related activities and practices. The board further accepts the declaration of the State Board of Education that “all students … possess the constitutional right to the free exercise of religion and to have their schools free from sectarian control or influence.” To this end, the board hereby establishes the following guidelines to preserve the rights of all students within the framework of the respective constitutions.

A. Instruction about religious matters and/or using religious materials shall be conducted in an objective, neutral, non-devotional manner and shall serve a secular educational purpose. History, sociology, literature, the arts and other disciplines taught in school may have a religious dimension. Study of these disciplines, including the religious dimension, shall give neither preferential nor disparaging treatment to any single religion or to religion in general and must not be introduced or utilized for devotional purposes.

Criteria used to guide academic inquiry in the study of religion shall seek the same neutrality, objectivity and educational effectiveness expected in other areas of the curriculum. In addition, materials and activities should be sensitive to America’s pluralistic society and should educate rather than indoctrinate. Instructional activities should meet the three-part test established and used by the U.S. Supreme Court to determine constitutionality: (1) the activity must have a secular purpose; (2) the activity’s principal or primary effect must be one that neither advances nor inhibits religion; and (3) the activity must not impose excessive involvement on the part of the school in order to maintain a neutral position towards the advancement of religion. This constitutional restriction shall not preclude a student from expressing his/her views relative to belief or non-belief about a religious-related issue in compositions, reports, music, art, debate and classroom discussion, when consistent with the assignment.

All religious-related instructional materials and/or activities must relate to a secular student learning goals or standards. Staff shall avoid assigning work that emphasizes the religious aspects of a holiday. Individual students should be allowed, at their own direction, to use religious personages, events or symbols as a vehicle for artistic expression, if consistent with the assignment. State law prohibits staff from requiring that students reveal, analyze or critique their religious beliefs, from grading academic work on its religious expression if any, from censoring or imposing consequences on students who engage in religious expression in accordance with the law, or from imposing the religious beliefs of the staff member on students.

B. A student may decline to participate in a school activity that is contrary to his/her religious convictions.

C. If non-curriculum-related student groups are permitted to meet on school premises immediately before or after school hours, students shall be permitted to meet to discuss religious, political, philosophical or other issues provided such group meetings are student-initiated and student-managed in compliance with Board Policy 2158, Non-curriculum Related Student Groups.

D. Religious groups may rent school facilities under the policy providing for facilities rental. Activities of such groups shall be clearly separated from school-sponsored activities so that the school district does not support or appear to support the establishment of religion.

E. A student may distribute religious literature under the same conditions that other literature may be distributed on the campus provided that such distribution does not intrude on the operation of the school.

F. Material and/or announcements promoting religion may not be distributed by non-students or on behalf of groups or individuals who are not students.

G. Religious services, programs or assemblies shall not be conducted in school facilities during school hours or in connection with any school sponsored or school related activity. Speakers and/or programs that convey a religious or devotional message are prohibited. This restriction does not preclude the presentation of choral or musical assemblies which may use religious music or literature as a part of the program or assembly.

H. Musical, artistic and dramatic presentations which have a religious theme may be included in course work and programs on the basis of their particular artistic and educational value or traditional secular usage. They shall be presented in a neutral, non-devotional manner, be related to the objective of the instructional program, and be accompanied by comparable artistic works of a nonreligious nature.

Since a variety of activities is included as part of a holiday theme, care must be exercised to focus on the historical and secular aspects of the holiday rather than its devotional meanings. Music programs shall not use the religious aspect of a holiday as the underlying message or theme. Pageants, plays and other dramatic activities shall not be used to convey religious messages. Religious symbols such as nativity scenes, if used, shall be displayed in conjunction with a variety of secular holiday symbols so that the total presentation emphasizes the cultural rather than religious significance of the holiday.

I. A student, upon the request of a parent, may be excused to participate in religious instruction for a portion of a school day provided the activity is not conducted on school property. (Credit shall not be granted for such instruction.)

J. Upon receipt of a parent(s) request, a student shall be excused from attending school in observance of a religious holiday.

K. Students may wear religious attire or symbols provided they are not materially and substantially disruptive to the educational process.

L. As a matter of individual liberty, a student may of his/her own volition engage in private, non-disruptive prayer at any time not in conflict with learning activities. School staff shall neither encourage, nor discourage a student from engaging in non-disruptive oral or silent prayer or any other form of devotional activity.

M. Commencement exercises shall be free from sectarian influence, including invocations and benedictions.

N. There shall be no school sponsorship of baccalaureate services. Interested parents and students may plan and organize baccalaureate exercises provided that the service is not promoted through the school and staff, and student participation is voluntary. Students, parents and staff who are aggrieved by practices or activities conducted in the school or district may register their concern with the building principal or district superintendent.

Cross References:
Board Policy 2153 Non-curriculum-related Student Groups
Board Policy 3122 Student Absences
Board Policy 3220 Freedom of Expression
Board Policy 3223 Freedom of Assembly
Board Policy 3224 Student Dress
Board Policy 4220 Complaints Regarding Staff or Program
Board Policy 4237 Contests, Advertising and Promotions
Board Policy 4235 Public Performances
Board Policy 4260 Use of School Facilities

Legal References:
U.S. Constitution First Amendment, Fourteenth Amendment
Wash. Constitution Art. I, § 11
Wash. Constitution Art. 9, Sec. 4 and Art. 26
RCW 28A.600.025 Student rights of religious expression –Duty of superintendent of public instruction to inform school districts
WAC 392-400-227 School district rules defining students’ religious rights

Adoption Date: 10/15/00
Raymond School District #116



 2409‑CREDIT FOR COMPETENCY/PROFICIENCY

World Languages

Raymond School District recognizes the value of preparing students to be global citizens with the skills to communicate in English and other world languages. In our state’s diverse communities, it is not unusual for students to have various opportunities to develop language skills, for example, by usingthe language at home, attending language programs offered in the community, learning online or living abroad. The district encourages students and their families to take advantage of any language learning opportunities available to them.

To enable students to fully benefit from the advantages of multilingualism, the district will encourage students to learn to understand, speak, read and write at a high level of language proficiency. Proficiency can also be demonstrated in languages that are only spoken or signed.

In order to recognize the language proficiency of students, the superintendent will develop procedures for awarding world language credits to students based on demonstrated proficiency across a range of language skills.

Cross References: 
Policy 2410, High School Graduation Requirements

Legal References: 
RCW 28A.230.090, High school graduation requirements or equivalencies – Reevaluation of graduation requirements -Review and authorization of proposed changes – Credit for courses taken before attending high school -Postsecondary credit equivalencies
WAC 180-51-050, High school credit -Definition

Management Resources: 
Policy News, August 2010, Competency Based Credits

Adoption Date: 07/28/2016
Raymond School District #116



2409P‑CREDIT FOR COMPETENCY/PROFICIENCY

World Languages Credit for Competency/Proficiency

A. Definition:

For purposes of this procedure, a world language is defined according to the definition used by the Higher Education Coordinating Board as “[a]ny natural language that has been formally studied […], including American Sign Language (AMESLAN, the language of the deaf community), andlanguages no longer spoken, such as Latin and ancient Greek. However, neither computer ‘languages’ nor forms of deaf signing aside from AMESLAN are acceptable.”

B. Demonstrating Competency/Proficiency in a World Language

The district will manage the assessment process so that students seeking competency based credit can demonstrate competency/proficiency across language skills.

Assessments will be aligned to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines in order to ensure consistency across languages. The district will select the appropriate assessment instrument(s) from the following:

  1. Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency (STAMP) in reading, writing, and speaking (and listening, if available) for all languages for which it is available (as of 2011, Spanish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Chinese). STAMP is offered by Avant Assessment (http://avantassessment.com).
  2. American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) assessments Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) or Oral Proficiency Interview Computer Based (OPIc) and Writing Proficiency Test (WPT) — for languages for which STAMP is not available or for which ACTFL assessments aredeemed to be more appropriate. ACTFL assessments are offered through Language Testing International (http://www.languagetesting.com).
  3. Appropriate assessments for American Sign Language such as the Sign Language Proficiency Interview (SLPI).
  4. For languages that do not currently have any other nationally available proficiency based assessment, the district will work with local language communities and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) World Languages Program to develop a collection of evidence process, such asLinguaFolio, that is aligned with ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.

C. Determining Competency and Credit Equivalencies

The district will award one or more credits based on the student demonstrating an overall proficiency level according to the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines as follows:

  1. Novice Mid – 1 credit (Carnegie Unit)
  2. High – 2 credits
  3. Intermediate Low – 3 credits
  4. Intermediate Mid – 4 credits

Since students may demonstrate varied levels of proficiency across skills, credits will be awarded based on the lowest common level of proficiency demonstrated across the skill areas.

(Example: If a student demonstrated Intermediate Mid-level proficiency in Speaking, but Novice Mid in Reading and Writing, then credits would be awarded based on the lowest common level of demonstrated proficiency: one credit for Novice Mid. The student would not receive individual credits for separate language skills. In this example, the student would not receive four credits for Intermediate Mid in Speaking and one credit each for Novice Mid in Reading and Writing. The total award is one World Language credit.)

D. Offering Testing Opportunities

The district will manage the assessment process so that students have multiple opportunities to take or retake the assessment(s) required to demonstrate proficiency. Assessments must be offered in a proctored setting with appropriate technology. The district will approve the site(s) where the assessments are offered, which could include individual schools, district buildings, community colleges, universities, educational service districts, or other community settings.

E. Paying for Assessments

Students who are native speakers of languages other than English have their testing fees covered by the district. Whether a student is a native speaker of a given language is determined by the information recorded on the student’s Home Language Survey.

Fees may vary depending on the assessment costs.

F. Reporting Results

The district will receive official test results for each student participating in the assessment process. The district will provide a letter to the student with a copy of the test results and an indication of how many world language credits, if any, may be awarded. If requested by the student, the schoolcounselors will record the world language credits earned on the official transcript. Credits will be awarded with a grade of “Pass.”

Credit Retrieval Based on State Exam Proficiencies

Students who meet standard on the mandated state exams or state-approved alternative assessments will be allowed to retrieve credit in the following ways:

State Assessment: Reading
Previously Failed Course: English 9 or English 10
Credit Retrieved: 0.5

State Assessment: Writing
Previously Failed Course: English 9 or English 10
Credit Retrieved: 0.5

State Assessment: Science
Previously Failed Course: Environmental Science,Biology
Credit Retrieved: 0.5

State Assessment: Math
Previously Failed Course: Algebra 1, Geometry or equivalent
Credit Retrieved: 0.5

State Assessment: Algebra EOC Exam
Previously Failed Course: Algebra 1
Credit Retrieved: Up to 1.0

State Assessment: Geometry EOC Exam
Previously Failed Course: Geometry
Credit Retrieved: Up to 1.0

State Assessment: Biology EOC Exam
Previously Failed Course: Biology
Credit Retrieved:Up to 1.0

  • Previously failed course remains on transcript and retains the grade of “F”
  • Retrieved credit receives a “P” on transcript and meets appropriate graduation requirement
  • Teachers retain the option to change student grades (WAC 180-44-010). However, the combination of grade changes and credits retrieved due to passing state exams may not result in students earning more than 1.0 total credits for that course requirement.


2410‑HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The board will establish graduation requirements, which at a minimum satisfy those established by the State Board of Education. The board will approve additional graduation requirements as recommended by the superintendent or designee. Graduation requirements in effect when a student first enrolls in high school will remain in effect until that student graduates. The board will award a regular high school diploma to every student enrolled in the district who meets the requirements established by the district. Only one diploma will be awarded with no distinctions being made between the various programs of instruction that may be pursued.

I. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATING

Each student must meet the following requirements to graduate from high school: (1) complete the credit requirements specified in the procedure accompanying this policy; (2) pass the necessary state assessments or a state-approved alternative assessment; and (3) complete a high school and beyond plan.

II. IMPLEMENTATION

The superintendent or designee will develop procedures for implementing this policy according to applicable state law.

Cross References:
2418 – Waiver of High School Graduation Credits
3520 – Student Fees, Fines, or Charges
3241 – Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action
3110 – Qualification of Attendance and Placement

Legal References:
Legal References: RCW 28A.230.090 High school graduation requirements or equivalencies — Reevaluation of graduation requirements — Review and authorization of proposed changes — Credit for courses taken before attending high school — Postsecondary credit equivalencies
RCW 28A.230.097 Career and technical high school course equivalencies
RCW 28A.230.120 High school diplomas — Issuance — Option to receive final transcripts — Notice
RCW 28A.230.122 International baccalaureate diplomas
RCW 28A.600.300-400 Running start program – Definition
RCW 28A.635.060 Defacing or injuring school property — Liability of pupil, parent or guardian — Withholding grades, diploma, or transcripts — Suspension and restitution — Voluntary work program as alternative — Rights protected
Chapter 180-51 WAC High school graduation requirements
WAC 392-121-182 Alternative learning experience requirements
Chapter 392-169 WAC Special service programs – Running start program
Chapter 392-348 WAC Secondary education
Chapter 392-410 WAC Courses of study and equivalencies
WAC 392-410-350 Seal of Biliteracy
WAC 392-415-070 Mandatory high school transcript contents –Items—Timelines

Laws of 2018, ch. 127, § 2 Civics Education

Management Resources:
2018 – May Issue
2017 – October Issue
2015 – October Issue
2014 – December Issue
2013 – September Issue
2012 – April Issue
2011 – October Issue
2010 – June Issue
2009 – April Issue
2009 – February Issue
Policy News, August 2007 Graduation Requirements Modified by Legislature
Policy News, October 2004 Graduation Requirements: High School and Beyond Plans
Policy News, February 2004 High School Graduation Requirements
Policy News, December 2000 2004 High School Graduation Requirements Adopted
Policy News, April 1999 Variations Complicate College Credit Equivalencies

Adoption Date: 12/18/17; Technical Fix: 5/29/18
Raymond School District #116



2410P—HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Overview

The Raymond School District recognizes the worth of every student and is committed to offering a range of academic, vocational and technical choices, personal and career counseling, and community and work experiences to ensure that each individual has the opportunity to achieve his or her lifelong potential.

We accomplish this mission by:

  • Providing the highest quality comprehensive programs
  • Incorporating flexibility into individual programs
  • Employing innovative strategies to enhance learning
  • Addressing changes in our world and responding to emerging needs
  • Facilitating the successful transition to further education and careers
  • Building a culture that values and honors educational achievement
  • Creating and implementing measurement systems that continually evaluates and encourages specific improvement

The Raymond School Board believes that every student is entitled to the opportunity to participate in an educational program that encourages meaningful learning relationships, and is both rigorous and relevant. At a minimum, students will meet the learning goals set by the state:

(1) Read with comprehension, write with skill, and communicate effectively and responsibly in a variety of ways and settings;

(2) Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history; geography; arts; and health and fitness;

(3) Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate experience and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and

(4) Understand the importance of work and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

Each student who has successfully completed an instructional program appropriate to his/her interests and needs shall be awarded a diploma at graduation ceremonies. The board shall award a regular high school diploma to every student enrolled in the district who meets the requirements of graduation established by the district. Only one diploma shall be awarded, with no distinctions being made between the various programs of instruction that may have been pursued. The diploma certifies that the student is ready for the next step in his/her life.

I. PUBLICATION OF GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Prior to registering in high school and each year thereafter, each student and his or her parents or guardians will be provided with a copy of the graduation requirements in effect for that student (those in effect when the student enrolled in ninth grade). Graduation requirements may also be included in the student handbook.

II. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

Period of Eligibility to Earn Credits


Generally, credit towards high school graduation will be earned in grades nine through twelve. However, upon request, the district may award high school credit towards fulfilling graduation requirements to a student who has completed high school courses while in seventh or eighth grade if one of the following applies:

A. The course was taken with high school students, and the student successfully passed the same course requirements, and examinations as the high school students enrolled in the class; or

B. The course taught at the middle school level has been determined by the district to be similar or equivalent to a course taught at the high school level.

Awarding of High School Credit

The district will award high school credit for successful completion of a specified unit of study. A student successfully completes a specified unit of study by doing one of the following:

A. Earning a passing grade according to the district’s grading policy;

B. Demonstrating proficiency or mastery of content standards as determined by the district (the district will establish a process for determining proficiency or mastery for credit bearing courses of study); or

C. Successfully completing an established number of hours of planned instructional activities to be determined by the district.

Credits from Other Programs 


The principal or designee is responsible for determining which credits will be recognized by the district for students enrolling from another state approved learning program (public school, approved private school, or home school), or from out-of-state, or out-of-country. The district will accept credits from another Washington public school or accredited state private school or accredited out-of-state public or private school to the extent the credit matches a district graduation requirement, or may be counted as an elective credit. The district will evaluate credits from unaccredited programs or home schools as described below for home school students. Decisions of the principal or designee may be appealed to the superintendent within fifteen school days of the initial decision.

Total Number of Credits Required

Class of 2018 (Entering 9th grade after July 1 of 2014)

English – 4
Mathematics – 3
Science – 3
Social Studies – 3
Arts – 1
Health and Fitness – 2
Career and Tech Ed – 2
Social – 1
Electives – 5
Total Required Credits: 24

Class of 2019 (Entering 9th grade after July 1 of 2015)

English – 4
Mathematics – 3
Science – 3
Social Studies – 3 (must include a one-half credit standalone civics course)
Arts – 2
Health and Fitness – 2
Career and Tech Ed – 2
Social – 1
World Language – 2*
Electives – 2
Total Required Credits: 24

*A student may substitute other courses that better align with his/her High School and Beyond Plan.

Subject Area Requirements And Approved Courses

The following courses (or their equivalent, as approved by the principal) are approved for satisfying the subject area requirements as established by the state board of education.

Courses marked with an (CTE) have been identified as “Career and Technical Education” courses.

English Creative Writing

  • English I
  • English II
  • English III
  • English IV
  • Language Arts 
Communications
  • Pre-College Prep English
  • College Prep English
  • Advanced Placement English
  • Business English (CTE)

Mathematics Accounting

  • Advanced Placement Math
  • Applied Math II (CTE)
  • Financial Algebra
  • Life Skills Math (CTE)
  • Math Proficiency
  • Consumer Math (CTE)
  • Occupational Math (CTE)
  • Pre- Algebra
  • Algebra 1
  • Algebra 2
  • Geometry
  • Applied Math (CTE)
  • Pre-Calculus

U. S. History and Government

  • U.S. Government
  • U.S. History
  • Washington State History
  • Contemporary World Problems

Lab Science

  • Advanced Biology
  • Agricultural Science
  • Anatomy/Physiology
  • Applied Bio/Chem
  • Biology Botany/Zoology
  • Chemistry
  • Earth Science
  • Ecology
  • Physical Science
  • Natural Resources (May be O)
  • Physics

Career and Technical Education

  • Accounting
  • Advanced Computer Applications
  • Advanced Foods/Textiles
  • Clothing/Housing
  • Graphic Arts
  • Computer Art/Digital Images
  • Computer-aided Design
  • Digitools
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Keyboarding I/II and III/IV
  • Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Information Processing Applications
  • Life Management Skills
  • Microcomputer Applications
  • Natural Resources
  • Publishing
  • Theater Design
  • Video Production Construction Technology
  • Web Page Design
  • Wood Shop
  • Work Study

Physical Education

  • Physical Education 9
  • Physical Education 10
  • Advanced Physical Education
  • Weight Lifting
  • PE/Athletics

Fine, Visual & Performing Arts

  • Art
  • Band
  • Choir
  • Jazz Band
  • Jewelry (CTE)
  • Speech/Drama I
  • Speech/Drama II
  • Video Production (CTE)

Social Sciences

  • Early Childhood Education (CTE)
  • Independent Living (CTE)
  • Personal Choices (CTE)
  • Psychology
  • Sociology

Note: On-line Courses, IEP Courses and Running Start Courses may qualify in areas above, but must be approved by the Principal.

*Per Chapter 28A.231 RCW, each school district must offer instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in at least one health class required for graduation. The CPR instruction must have been developed by the American Heart of Association or the American Red Cross or be nationally recognized based on the most current national guidelines for CPR. The instruction must include use of automated external defibrillators (AED) which may be taught by video. The district may provide the CPR instruction directly or arrange it through community-based providers such as the local fire department. Students are not required to earn CPR certification for successful completion of the instruction.

Alternative Programs

The district may grant credit toward graduation requirements for planned learning experiences primarily conducted away from the facilities owned, operated, or supervised by the district.

A proposal for approval of out-of-school learning activities will be submitted prior to the experience, will be at no additional cost to the district, and will include at least the following information:

A. The objective(s) of the program;

B. The teaching component(s) of the program, including where and when teaching activities will be conducted by school district certificated staff;

C. A schedule of the duration of the program, including beginning and ending dates within the school year;

D. A description of how student performance will be supervised, evaluated, and recorded by the certificated staff or by qualified school district employees under the direct supervision of the certificated staff;

E. A description of intervention techniques and criteria for their use;

F. A description of how student performance will be assessed;

G. The qualifications of instructional personnel; and

H. The plans for evaluation of program.

The district will keep a list of approved programs on file in the superintendent’s office. The superintendent or designee will communicate the reasons for approval or disapproval to those making the request.

Running Start

The Running Start program allows high school juniors and seniors to attend community college classes (100 level or above) for part or all of their schedule. Students must be of junior standing or above to be eligible for the program. Students earn college credit, which is also converted and applied to their high school transcript.

In order to enroll in the Running Start program, students need to do the following:

A. Contact the college they are interested in attending and arrange to take the ASSET or COMPASS placement test. The test is offered at various times and results are often available the following day. Minimum scores in reading and writing are required.

B. Speak with their counselor to assess credits needed for graduation, then decide which courses they would like to take at the college. Note that part-time Running Start students will need to coordinate college classes so that they do not interfere with their high school classes. Full-time Running Start students will not be enrolled in courses at the high school, even when the community college they attend is not in session.

C. Obtain a Running Start authorization form from the college or their high school counselor. The counselor will sign the form after the student completes their portion. A parent signature is required if the student is under 18 years old.

D. Take the authorization form to the college and register for classes. Once the classes are completed, the college will notify the high school and credits will be added to the student’s transcript.

Credit for Career and Technical Work-Based Learning

The district regards work experience as a part of the educational program of students as part of the secondary school curriculum rather than just a device to relieve a staffing shortage. The district may grant credit for work experience based upon the following factors:

A. The school will supervise the work program.

B. The work experience will specifically relate to the student’s school program.

C. The work experience will represent growth in the student, and the type of work will have definite educational value.

D. The work experience will provide a varied job experience.

E. The career placement counselor will supplement the work experience with an adequate program of guidance, placement, follow-up, and coordination between job and school.

F. The work experience may be a planned part of the credit given for a school subject (e.g., sales training class).

G. The district may grant one credit for not less than one hundred eighty hours for instructional work based learning experience and not less than three hundred sixty hours of cooperative work based learning experience related to a student’s school program.

H. The employer will legally employ the student who must have passed his or her sixteenth birthday.

I. The employer will file a report of the student’s work record with the school, indicating the student made satisfactory progress on the job.

J. The regular state apprenticeship program and school cooperatively develop the student’s training, which meets graduation requirements standards.

K. The program standards and procedures align with the state career and technical work based learning standards.

National Guard High School Career Training

The district may grant credit for National Guard high school career training in lieu of either required or elective high school credits. Approval by the district will be obtained prior to a student’s participation in a National Guard training program as follows:

A. MIL Form 115 or an equivalent form provided by the National Guard will be completed and filed with the school district; and

B. The number of credits toward high school graduation to be granted will be calculated, agreed upon by the student, and an authorized representative of the school district, and such agreement noted on MIL Form 115 or such equivalent form

C. The district may grant credit toward high school graduation upon certification by a National Guard training unit commander that the student has met all program requirements.

Home School Credit

To gain credit for a homeschool course of study, a student will provide:

A. A journal that reflects the actual work completed during a home-study course of study

B. Exhibit(s) of any specific projects completed (e.g., themes, research papers, art and/or shop projects); or

C. Any such other performance-based exhibits of specific course-related accomplishments.

To gain credit for a course of study, a student must demonstrate proficiency at a minimum of 80 percent of the objectives of the course. Such testing will be available as an ancillary service of the district if it is regularly available to all students. If not, the parent may engage district-approved personnel to conduct such an assessment at a cost determined by such personnel.

Credit is granted for the following approved schools:

A. Community colleges, vocational-technical institutes, four-year colleges and universities, and approved private schools in the state of Washington, and

B. Other schools or institutions that are approved by the district after evaluation for a particular course offering.

III. STATE ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENT

Each student must earn either a certificate of academic achievement or a certificate of individual achievement to graduate from high school.

Certificate of Academic Achievement

A student will receive a certificate of academic achievement if he or she passes the necessary statewide assessments or a state-approved alternative assessment.

Certificate of Individual Achievement

A student qualifying for special education services may earn a certificate of individual achievement after passing assessments determined by the student’s individualized education program team to be appropriate for the student based on their learner characteristics, post-secondary goals, and previous testing history.

Expedited Appeal Process for Waiving Student Assessment Requirements

For the graduating classes of 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018, an expedited appeal process for waiving specific requirements in RCW 28A.655.061 pertaining to the certificate of academic achievement and the certificate of individual achievement is available for eligible students who have not met the state standard on the English language arts statewide student assessment, the mathematics high school statewide student assessment, or both. The student or the student’s parent, guardian, or principal may initiate an appeal with the district and the district has the authority to determine which appeals to submit to the superintendent of public instruction for review and approval.

A student in the class of 2014, 2015, 2016, or 2017 is eligible for the expedited appeal process if he or she has met all other graduation requirements established by the state and district.

A student in the class of 2018 is eligible for the expedited appeal process if he or she has met all other graduation requirements established by the state and district and has attempted at least one alternative assessment option as established in RCW 28A.655.065.

IV. HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN REQUIREMENT

High school and beyond plans must be initiated for students during the seventh or eighth grade to guide their high school experience and prepare them for postsecondary education or training and their careers. The district will encourage parents and guardians to be involved in the process of developing an updating students’ high school and beyond plans. School staff will work to update students’ plans as necessary based on their changing interests, goals, and needs. Students’ plans will be provided to students’ parents or guardians in their native language if that language is one of the two most frequently spoken non-English languages of students in the district.

All high school and beyond plans will, at a minimum, include the following:

A. Identification of career goals, aided by a skills and interest assessment;

B. Identification of educational goals;

C. Identification of dual credit programs and the opportunities they create for students, including but not limited to career and technical education programs, running start programs, and college in the high school programs;

D. Information about the college bound scholarship program established in chapter 28B.118 RCW;

E. A four-year plan for course taking that does the following:

1. Includes information about options for satisfying state and local graduation requirements;

2. Satisfies state and local graduation requirements;

3. Aligns with the student’s secondary and postsecondary goals;

4. Identifies dual credit programs and the opportunities they create for students; and

5. Includes information about the college bound scholarship program.

E. By the end of the twelfth grade, a current resume or activity log that provides a written compilation of the student’s education, any work experience, and any community service and how the school district has recognized the community service.

F. A public presentation concerning their plan or an alternative area of interest. This is sometimes known as a “Senior Project” or “Culminating Project.”

V. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

1. Students are required to participate in community service for a total of 100 hours.

a. Community service is defined as time spent improving our community that does not have personal benefit as its primary goal.

b. In order to qualify as service hours, the following requirements must be met:

i. The service must meet a demonstrable community need.

ii. Local agencies, school personnel, organizations and/or community groups must be involved in identifying the need and developing the project.

iii. Someone other than the student(s) and their immediate family providing the service must benefit from the service.

c. Examples of service include participating in community clean-up, charity events, community performances, tutoring, etc. Some service hours may also be earned by attending community and service organization meetings, i.e., Lions Club, Kiwanis, city council, school board, etc.

d. The only class in which service hours can be earned is “Leadership”.

e. Elected officers may not receive service hours for performing their official duties.

f. Normally, these hours will be earned in this manner:

i. Freshmen—10 hours

ii. Sophomores—20 hours

iii. Juniors—30 hours

iv. Seniors—40 hours

g. Transfer students will complete a pro-rated number of hours, the number to be determined after a conference with the principal or his/her designee.

h. Hours will be reported on the appropriate form to the counseling office.

i. Student diplomas will note the number of service hours earned.

2. Beginning with the graduating class of 2008-2009, the following requirements will also apply. No student will graduate from Raymond High School who is not ready for his or her next step. In particular, this means that each student will have, at a minimum, either a

a. Bona fide job contract with a career path

b. Acceptance into a college, university or technical school

c. Acceptance into a bona fide training program

d. Certification in a career field

e. Diploma from a 2-year institution

f. Military commitment/national service

g. Service Mission

VI. WAIVER OF GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

All state requirements must be satisfied except that the district may waive Washington history and government for students who have completed and passed a state history and government course in another state during grades seven through twelve and who have fulfilled study of the Washington state constitution through an alternative learning experience approved by the principal. Additionally, the district may waive physical education, pursuant to RCW 28A.230.050, upon written request of a parent or guardian on account of physical disability, employment, or religious belief or because of participation in directed athletics or military science and tactics. This will not alter the credit requirements established by the board.

The following procedure will be followed in graduation waiver requests:

The principal is responsible for evaluating educational experiences of individual students and recommending graduation to the superintendent when a student has not met requirements.

An individual student may be granted an exemption from any requirement in this policy if such requirement impedes the progress toward graduation provided there is a direct relationship between the failure to meet the requirement and the student’s ability. When a 12th grade student transfers from another high school, the student may be permitted to graduate with a lesser number of credits provided that minimum state course and credit requirements are satisfied and the student successfully passes a full schedule of classes during his or her 12th year of school.

The principal determines whether to waive graduation requirements using the following procedure:

A. The request will be initiated by the parent or the eligible student;

B. The principal will investigate the request for waiver of graduation requirements;

C. The principal will make a determination in writing based upon appropriate data and upon conclusions of the investigation;

D. The principal will develop appropriate record keeping procedures for storage of all pertinent data relating to each waiver request; and

E. The principal or designee will notify the parent or eligible student that they may appeal the principal’s decision regarding a waiver request in writing to the superintendent no later than 30 days prior to the anticipated graduation date.

VII. SEAL OF BILITERACY

To be awarded the Washington Seal of Biliteracy, graduating high school students must meet the following criteria:

A. Demonstrate proficiency in English by (1) meeting statewide minimum graduation requirements in English as established by the Washington State Board of Education and (2) meeting state standards on the reading and writing or English language arts assessment; and

B. Demonstrate proficiency in one or more world language. For purposes of this section, “world language” is defined as a language other than English, including American Sign Language, Latin, and Native American or other indigenous languages or dialects. Proficiency may be demonstrated by:

1. Passing a foreign language Advanced Placement exam with a score of 3 or higher;

2. Passing an International Baccalaureate exam with a score of 4 or higher;

3. Demonstrating intermediate-mid level or higher proficiency on the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) guidelines using assessments approved by OSPI for competency-based credits; and demonstrating proficiency using reading assessments approved by OSPI (when developed);

4. Qualifying for four competency-based credits by demonstrating proficiency in speaking, writing, and reading the world language at intermediate-mid level or higher on the ACTFL proficiency guidelines according to Policy 2409, Credit for Competency-Proficiency; or

5. Demonstrating proficiency in speaking, writing, and reading the world language through other national or international assessments approved by OSPI.

VIII. STUDENTS WITH AN INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM (IEP)

A student with a disability may fulfill graduation requirements as follows:

By the age of 14, the student will participate with the IEP Team (including a special education teacher, general education teacher, parents, student, and other school personnel and agency representatives who will assist the student in achieving the goals of the IEP) in a discussion of transition service needs that focuses on the student’s course of study.

As an outcome of the discussion, the IEP will include appropriate graduation requirements based on the student’s individual needs and abilities consistent with the student’s transition plan. Modifications to the district’s standard graduation requirements may include:

A. Attainable alternate classwork or individualized activities substituted for standard requirements;

B. A statement of waiver for any waived standard graduation requirements; or

C. An extension of time for the student to remain in school to complete graduation requirements. The student may remain in school up to and including the school year in which the student reaches twenty-one years of age.

The student will, in cooperation with his or her parent or guardian and the IEP team, determine:

A. The projected date by which all graduation requirements will be met;  and

B. The projected date and conditions under which the student will participate in the graduation ceremony.

The student will have an IEP that incorporates all issues and decisions from the above procedures. Any decision that modifies the district’s standard graduation requirements will be made through the IEP process.  Annually or as needed, the IEP will be reviewed or revised to accommodate the student’s progress and development.

IX. GRADUATION CEREMONIES

If students fulfill graduation requirements by the end of the last term of their senior year, they may participate in graduation ceremonies. Each student will be awarded a diploma after satisfactorily completing local and state requirements. Upon request, each graduating student   will receive a final transcript. Each student will be notified of this opportunity at least one month prior to the close of the school term.
 
Graduation ceremonies will be conducted in the following manner:

A. Each participating student must participate in the graduation ceremony rehearsal. Each student who participates will purchase or rent the proper cap and gown as designated by the school administration and the class advisor and officers.

B. Caps and gowns will be worn in the proper manner, as designated by the school administration and class advisor.

C. Students who participate will use good taste in their choice of accessories for their attire.

D. Each student who participates will cooperate with the class advisor and participate in all parts of the graduation ceremonies.

Failure to comply with the above requirements may forfeit a student’s privilege to participate in the graduation ceremonies.

X. WITHHOLDING OF A DIPLOMA

The district may withhold a student’s diploma or transcript until the student pays for any school property the student has lost or willfully damaged. Upon payment for damages, or the equivalency through voluntary work, the district will release the diploma or transcript. When the damages or fines do not exceed $100, the student or his/her parents will have the right to an appeal using the same process as used for short-term suspension as defined in Policy 3241, Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action. When damages are in excess of $100, the appeal process for long-term suspension as defined in Policy 3241, Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action, will apply. The district may, in its discretion, choose to offer in-school suspension in these circumstances.

In the event that the district has imposed other forms of corrective action for violations of school rules, the district may deny the student’s participation in graduation ceremonies. Such exclusion from graduation ceremonies is regarded as a school suspension. In such instances, the district will grant the diploma.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

It is the intent of the board that the high school diploma represents attainment of the skills and traits represented by the foregoing. Therefore, the staff will implement a program in which the following principles are paramount:

1. Career, personal and intervention counseling will be made available to all students in a substantial manner.

a. Students and staff will participate annually in a student-led parent/teacher conference that will focus on the five-year plan and progress in that plan, as well as any needed changes.

b. A student advisory system is to be implemented that allows consistent review and update of student plans, progress and portfolio. Staff will be given time during the work day on a regular basis to work with their assigned students throughout their high school tenure.

c. The district will attempt to provide a full-time personal counselor.

2. Partnerships with business and community members will be pursued in order to add value to each student’s school experience. Examples include:

a. Linking students with businesses that will provide an introduction to an occupational field in which the student is interested.

b. Using business facilities or allowing businesses to use school facilities in order to facilitate student learning and career exposure.

c. Sharing students and staff with Grays Harbor College.

3. Student credit hours will reflect student ability, not time spent in a particular class; learning is to be the constant and time is to be the variable. Teachers and administrators will develop appropriate programs to maximize individual student achievement.

a. When a class is of such a nature as to allow measurement of meeting the learning objectives through a final exam, teachers are encouraged to develop final exams that demonstrate sufficient mastery in the subject to justify awarding credit to the student.

b. Accelerated individual learning is to be encouraged through technology.

c. Students are expected to make full use of all four years in preparing themselves for their next steps. Seniors will have a full and challenging schedule. Should a student complete all required credits prior to graduation, he/she is still expected to remain enrolled as a full-time student. The student may use this time to take additional classes on campus, enroll in Running Start or utilize work experience opportunities.

4. The five-year plan will be personal, updated annually and utilized to benefit the student. Options will be investigated and implemented that add incentive for students to prepare for their next steps.

a. The creation of the five-year plan will involve students, staff and parents at the beginning of the student’s high school tenure.

b. The plan will include the student’s anticipated next step after high school and incorporate learning experiences intended to fulfill the intent of the plan.

c. The plan will be modified as needed, but in any case, no less than once per year. It will be continually refined and used as a both a planning tool and a record of goal achievement.

d. The district will implement a formal counseling program, such as Navigation 101, to encourage students to make the best use of their high school years.

e. The district will investigate ways to create incentives for students to be engaged in their learning. These may include:

i. Ensuring all 7th-graders are aware of the World Class Scholars program and begin along that path.

ii. School/community scholarship programs.

iii. Business internships or long-term work study programs.

5. The teaching and assessment of work habits will be integrated throughout the student’s high school experience in order to create shared expectations of skills and behaviors that will also benefit them after graduation. Students will demonstrate survival skills, including such things as interview skills, ability to complete necessary forms (applications, loans, leases, etc.), managing a budget and reading a contract.

6. The focus of the student program will be on preparing each student for his/her post-high school activities, whatever those may be, i.e., two-year degree, technical certification, four-year college, military service, apprenticeship or entry into the career market. The teaching and assessment of work habits will be integrated throughout students’ high school experience in order to create shared expectations of skills and behaviors that will also benefit them after graduation. Students will demonstrate integrity through a strong work ethic that includes time management skills, ability to follow directions, desire to take the initiative and think independently. We believe that the basis of a successful experience in school, as in work, is for students to be where they are supposed to be, when they are supposed to be there, doing what they are supposed to do. Specifically, successful people are those who have good habits of attendance and a positive attitude; they are also accountable for their actions.

7. The culminating project will integrate the state learning goals and will demonstrate that each student is ready for his or her post-high school pursuits. The culminating project procedures will be made available to each student in the form of a packet that includes standards and timelines.

The following chart lists those qualities identified by Pacific County employers as desired traits. A Career and Technical Education (CTE) course that introduces these soft skills will be required of all freshmen. The course will include career exploration and teach the basic “survival skills” shown above. A CTE course will be included in the curriculum that teaches students entrepreneurial skills.

Trait/Observed Behavior
Dependability – Demonstrates through consistent behavior that others can trust that you will do what you say you will do.
Ethical Behavior – Accepts the standard of behavior set for the organization (honesty, respectful attitude, etc.).
Work Ethic – Shows respect for the resources of the employer and customers (including time you are paid, level of productivity, property of others).
Punctuality – Arrives on time, ready to work the full scheduled time.
Job Commitment – Recognizes the need to complete a job that was started and provide follow-through to completion.
Customer Service – Demonstrates friendliness, respect and helpful attitude to others.
Teamwork – Works in a group to accomplish a task and ware of how their actions affect others.
Accountability – Recognizes consequences of actions and accepts personal responsibility.  Does not put the blame on others or circumstances.
Confidentiality – Handles sensitive workplace information appropriately.
Positive Attitude – Has a willingness to learn.  Listens and takes direction, accepts constructive criticism and makes the best of a situation.
Works Independently – Works well when unsupervised.  Shows the ability to complete tasks.
Interpersonal Skills – Shows respect and consideration for others. Listens to others and is comfortable to be around.
Understands Expectations – Knows and accepts what is expected of him or her.
Initiative – Takes on tasks without being asked. Looks for opportunities to excel.
Appropriate Appearance/Hygiene – Demonstrates good personal grooming and a clean presentation.
Communication Skills – Uses appropriate language, listens well and asks questions when needed.
Flexibility – Adapts self to make the situation work.
Personal Issue Management – Keeps personal issues in balance with work so they don’t interfere with employer’s expectations.
Problem Solving – Has ability to look at issues and identify possible solutions.
Workplace Etiquette – Demonstrates acceptable levels of politeness.


 


2411—CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATIONAL COMPETENCY

Certificates of educational competency will be awarded by the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges.

To be eligible for a certificate of educational competency, a student who is 16 years of age or older but under 19 years of age must have a substantial and warranted reason for leaving the regular high school program, or have been home schooled.

The student may apply either to the resident district or the school the student last attended in the State of Washington. The application must be signed by the student’s parent and will include the recommendation of a staff review committee and the superintendent. Reasons for withdrawal to seek a certificate of education competency may include:

A. Personal problems which seriously impair the student’s ability to make reasonable progress toward high school graduation;

B. A financial crisis which directly affects the student and necessitates the student’s employment during school hours;

C. The lack of curriculum and instruction which constitute appropriate learning experiences for the student;

D. The inability or failure of the school of attendance to adjust its program for the individual or otherwise make arrangements for enrollment in a program in a manner which enables the student to advance toward graduation with reasonable progress and success;

E. A determination by the designated employee of the district that it is in the best interests of the student to withdraw in order to enter a postsecondary instituiton or the military, or to engage in employment; or

F. The student has been home-schooled and has essentially completed high school work.

Any student who feels that the denial to apply for a certificate of educational competency was unwarranted may appeal to the board of directors. The board of directors will make a decision within 30 calendar days of the request and such decision be final, subject to an appeal to a court of law pursuant to RCW 28A.645.010.

Cross References:
Policy 3114 Part-time, home-based or off-campus Students

Legal References:
RCW 28A.205.030 Reentry of prior dropouts into common schools, rules — Eligibility for GED test
RCW 28A.305.190 Eligibility to take GED test
Chapter 180-96 WAC General educational development (GED) test
Chapter 131-48 WAC Certificate of Educational Competence (Community and Technical Colleges)

Management Resources:
Policy News, December 2011 Changes in WSSDA’s Policy Reference Manual

Adoption Date: 02/23/12
Raymond School District #116
Technical Fix: 01/07/2013



2412—DIPLOMAS FOR VETERANS

The district will issue high school diplomas to an honorably discharged member of the armed forces of the United States who was scheduled to graduate from high school, but who left high school before graduation to serve in World War I, the Korean Conflict or the Vietnam era.

To be eligible for a diploma the veteran or his or her representative must fill out the application provided by the Washington State Department of Veteran Affairs and provide evidence of eligibility.

Veterans are eligible for the diploma even if they subsequently earned a high school equivalency certificate or are deceased.

The superintendent will determine those veterans who have substantial ties to the district. Examples include, but are not limited to: living or having lived in the district, having attended school in the district, having children or other descendents who have attended school in the district, having been employed by the district or volunteering in the district.

Cross-Reference:
Policy 2410 High School Graduation Requirements

Legal References:
RCW 28A-230-120 High school diplomas — Issuance— Option to receive final transcripts—Notice
RCW 41.04.005 “Veteran” defined for certain purposes

Management Resources:
Policy News, June 2008 Diplomas for Veterans
Policy News, June 2003 Honoring Veterans of the Korean Conflict
Policy News, April 2002 WWII Veterans May Receive Diplomas

Adoption Date: 8/28/08
Raymond School District #116



2413—EQUIVALENCY CREDIT FOR CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION COURSES

Each high school will adopt core academic course equivalencies for high school career and technical courses, provided that the career and technical course has been reviewed and approved for equivalency credit by a district team appointed by the superintendent or a designee.

The district team will include a school administrator, the career and technical administrator, an instructor from the core academic subject area, an instructor from the appropriate career and technical course, a school counselor, and a representative from the curriculum department.

Career and technical courses approved for equivalency will be:

A. Aligned with the state’s essential academic learning requirements and grade level expectations; and

B. Aligned with current industry standards, as evidenced in the curriculum frameworks. The local career and technical advisory committee will certify that courses meet industry standards.

The board will approve Advanced Placement (AP) computer science courses as equivalent to high school mathematics or science. The superintendent will adopt procedures to denote on the student’s transcript that AP computer science qualifies as a math-based quantitative course for students who complete it in their senior year.

Cross References:

2170 – Career and Technical Education
2410 – High School Graduation Requirements

Legal References:

RCW 28A.230.097 Career and technical high school course equivalencies.
RCW 28A.230.120 High School Diplomas – Issuance- Option to receive final transcripts –Notice
Laws of 2018, ch. 73, §§204, 217, 102
WAC 180-51 High school graduation requirements
WAC 392-410 Courses of study and equivalencies

Management Resources:

2018 – May Issue
2013 – September Issue
Policy News, August 2006 Legislature Codifies Course Equivalency for Career and Technical Courses

Adoption Date: 7/26/18
Raymond School District #116



2414—COMMUNITY SERVICE

The board recognizes that volunteering connects students to their communities and provides an opportunity for students to practice and apply their academic and social skills in preparation for entering the workforce. The board further recognizes that community service is associated with increased civic awareness and participation by students, and can inspire students to continue their education and skill development beyond high school. Community service is included in the district’s high school graduation requirements and is noted on the Diploma.

Cross References:
Policy 2410 High School Graduation Requirements

Legal References:
ESHB 1412
RCW 28A.320 Provisions Applicable to all Districts

Management Resources:
Policy and Legal News, June 2013 State law requires that districts adopt community service incentive policy

Adoption Date: 08/20/2013
Raymond School District #116



2418—WAIVER OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CREDITS

The board seeks to provide all students with the opportunity to complete graduation requirements without discrimination and without disparate impact on groups of students. In so doing, the board acknowledges that unusual circumstances may result in a student’s inability to earn all twenty-four credits required for high school graduation. Unusual circumstances may include, but are not limited to:

A. Homelessness;

B. A health condition resulting in an inability to attend class;

C. Limited English proficiency;

D. Disability, regardless of whether the student has an individualized education program or a plan under E. Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973;

E. Denial of an opportunity to retake classes or enroll in remedial classes free of charge during the first four years of high school;

F. Transfer during the last two years of high school from a school with different graduation requirements.

G. Other circumstances (e.g., emergency, natural disaster, trauma, personal or family crisis) that directly compromised a student’s ability to learn.

The board delegates to the superintendent or his/her designee discretion to grant a waiver of a maximum of two elective credits required for graduation. A student’s parent/guardian or an adult student must file the district’s Form 2418F with the superintendent’s office no later than thirty days prior to the student’s scheduled graduation date. In order to graduate, students granted a waiver must earn seventeen required subject credits (three English, three Math, three Science, three Social Studies, two Health and Fitness, two Arts, one Career and Technical Education) which may be by satisfactory demonstration of competence as provided by WAC 180-51-050.

Cross References:
2410 High School Graduation Requirements

Legal References:
RCW 28A.345.080 Model policy and procedure for granting waivers of credit for high school graduation.
WAC 180-51-068 State subject and credit requirements for high school graduation – Students entering ninth grade on or after July 1, 2015
WAC 180-51-050 High school credit – Definition.

Management Resources:
April 2015 Issue

Adoption Date: 6/25/15
Raymond School District #116



2418P‑PROCEDURE WAIVER OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CREDITS

A student or his/her parents/guardians may request a waiver of up to two elective credits during his/her year of expected graduation from high school due to unusual circumstances. The superintendent or designee will review each request on a case-by-case basis and use his or her judgment, experience and knowledge of the student to determine whether unusual circumstances exist to justify the waiver.

Request Process

Requests will be made using the district’s form made available for this purpose and will include any materials (e.g., letter from the student’s licensed physician) that document the unusual circumstances. Requests must be received by the superintendent or designee’s office no less than thirty days prior to graduation. The superintendent may waive the thirty day deadline in cases of catastrophic events occurring within thirty days of graduation that have a direct effect on the student or students requesting a waiver.

Determination

In determining whether to grant the request for waiver based on unusual circumstances such as those listed in Policy 2418, the superintendent or designee will consider factors such as:

  • Unique limitations directly affecting the student as a result of the unusual circumstances;
  • Whether the unusual circumstances were beyond the student’s control;
  • Whether the unusual circumstances compromised the student’s ability to learn;
  • The student’s efforts to cope with the unusual circumstances;
  • Documentation provided by the student’s parents or guardians;
  • Possible discriminatory effects on the student and/or possible disparate impact on a group of students if the waiver is not granted;
  • Significant decline in the student’s academic performance following the occurrence of the unusual circumstances.

In considering whether to grant the waiver, the Superintendent or designee may, in his or her discretion, consult with school staff who have knowledge of the student and with any person identified in the application as having knowledge of the student’s unique circumstances.

Response Process

The Superintendent or designee will provide a response to a request for waiver within ten (10) business days. A response granting the waiver will include the number of elective credits that will be waived and notification that completion of the remainder of required credits is required for graduation. A response denying the waiver will state the reason(s) therefore, which may include, but are not limited to:

  • The request was received within thirty days of graduation and does not concern a catastrophic event;
  • The request did not include sufficient information to justify waiver of high school graduation credit;
  • The request was not based on documented or verifiable events that would justify waiver of high school graduation credit.

The Superintendent or designee’s decision is final and will only apply to the student’s current graduation year.

Adoption Date: 6/25/15
Raymond School District #116



2418F‑Form – Waiver of High School Graduation Credits

Application for waiver of up to two elective high school graduation credits based on unusual circumstances

Instructions:

Please review the district’s Policy and Procedure 2418 prior to completing this form. This form must be completed, signed and provided to the Superintendent’s office no later than thirty business days prior to high school graduation for the year the waiver is requested.

Providing the completed form does not automatically guarantee a waiver will be granted. Once the application is submitted, the Superintendent or designee will respond to the request within ten business days with his or her decision.

Please attach any and all materials and/or documentation that would establish the existence of the unusual circumstances justifying a waiver (e.g., physician’s letter). Please attach additional pages if necessary to the narrative section.

Parents or adult students with limited English proficiency may request that this application and/or the policy and procedure be provided in a language that they understand.

Student Identification (required)

Name of person completing this form:_______________________

Relationship to student:_________________________________

Address of person completing this form:______________________________________________

Daytime phone number:_________________________________

Student’s Name:_______________________________________

Student’s ID Number/Date of Birth:__________________________

Expected year of graduation:_______________

Basis for Waiver Request (required) (check all that apply):

____Disability (regardless of whether student has an IEP or Section 504 plan)

____Health condition resulting in student’s inability to attend class

____Homelessness

____Limited English proficiency

____No opportunity to retake classes or enroll in remedial classes free of charge during the first four years of high school

____Transfer during the last two years of high school from a school with different graduation requirements

____Other circumstances (e.g., emergency, natural disaster, trauma, personal or family crisis) that directly compromised the student’s ability to learn

Narrative: (required)

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

Signature and Authorization: (required)

I am requesting that the Superintendent or designee waive (insert up to two elective credits)required for (insert student’s name) high school graduation in (insert year) due to the unusual circumstances indicated above.

I hereby authorize the Superintendent or designee to contact, consult and/or confer with any individual referenced in this application who would have knowledge of the unusual circumstances, except for those subject to a duty of confidentiality.

I hereby certify that the information provided on this application is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge.

Signature of parent or adult student __________________________________
Date________________________________

 

Adoption Date: 6/25/15
Raymond School District #116



2423—STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

The Raymond School Board recognizes that a combination of many factors affect student achievement. Critical among these are attendance, homework, grading and promotion. It is the district’s goal to ensure that district policy ensures these four areas are mutually supportive in their goal to advance student achievement.

Excused And Unexcused Absences
Definition of Absence
WAC 392-401-015 states the definition of an absence:
(1) A student is absent when they are:
(a) Not physically present on school grounds; and
(b) Not participating in the following activities at an approved location:
(i) Instruction;
(ii) Any instruction-related activity; or
(iii) Any other district or school approved activity that is regulated by an instructional/academic accountability system, such as participation in district-sponsored sports.
(2) Students shall not be absent if:
(a) They have been suspended, expelled, or emergency expelled pursuant to chapter 392-400 WAC;
(b) Are receiving educational services as required by RCW 28A.600.015 and chapter 392-400 WAC; and
(c) The student is enrolled in qualifying “course of study” activities as defined in WAC 392-121-107.
(3) A full day absence is when a student is absent for fifty percent or more of their scheduled day.
(4) A school or district shall not convert or combine tardies into absences that contribute to a truancy petition.

A student shall be considered absent if they are on school grounds but not in their assigned setting.

Excused and Unexcused Absences
Students are expected to attend all assigned classes each day. Upon enrollment and at the beginning of each school year, the district shall inform students and their parents/guardians of this expectation, the benefits of regular school attendance, the consequences of truancy, the role and responsibility of the district in regard to truancy, and resources available to assist the student and their parents and guardians in correcting truancy. The district will also make this information available online and will take reasonable steps to ensure parents can request and receive such information in languages in which they are fluent. Parents will be required to date and acknowledge review of this information online or in writing.

Excused Absences
Regular school attendance is necessary for mastery of the educational program provided to students of the district. At times, students may be appropriately absent from class. School staff will keep a record of absence and tardiness, including a record of excuse statements submitted by a parent/guardian, or in certain cases, students, to document a student’s excused absences. The following principles will govern the development and administration of attendance procedures within the district:

A. The following are valid excuses for absences:

(1) Illness, health condition or medical appointment (including, but not limited to, medical, counseling, dental, optometry, pregnancy, and in-patient or out-patient treatment for chemical dependency or mental health) for the student or person for whom the student is legally responsible;
(2) Family emergency including, but not limited to, a death or illness in the family;
(3) Religious or cultural purpose including observance of a religious or cultural holiday or participation in religious or cultural instruction;
(4) Court, judicial proceeding, court-ordered activity, or jury service;
(5) Post-secondary, technical school or apprenticeship program visitation, or scholarship interview;
(6) State-recognized search and rescue activities consistent with RCW 28A.225.055;
(7) Absence directly related to the student’s homeless or foster care/dependency status;
(8) Absences related to deployment activities of a parent or legal guardian who is an active duty member consistent with RCW 28A.705.010;
(9) Absences due to suspensions, expulsions or emergency expulsions imposed pursuant to chapter 392-400 WAC if the student is not receiving educational services and is not enrolled in qualifying “course of study” activities as defined in WAC 392-121-107;
(10) Absences due to student safety concerns, including absences related to threats, assaults, or bullying;
(11) Absences due to a student’s migrant status; and
(12) An approved activity that is consistent with district policy and is mutually agreed upon by the principal or designee and a parent, guardian, or emancipated youth.

A school principal or designee has the authority to determine if an absence meets the above criteria for an excused absence. Districts may define additional categories or criteria for excused absences.

A. If an absence is excused, the student will be permitted to make up all missed assignments outside of class under reasonable conditions and time limits established by the appropriate teacher; where reasonable, if a student misses a participation-type class, they can request an alternative assignment that aligns with the learning goals of the activity missed.

B. An excused absence will be verified by a parent/guardian or an adult, emancipated or appropriately aged student, or school authority responsible for the absence. If attendance is taken electronically, either for a course conducted online or for students physically within the district, an absence will default to unexcused until such time as an excused absence may be verified by a parent or other responsible adult. If a student is to be released for health care related to family planning or abortion, the student may require that the district keep the information confidential. Students thirteen and older have the right to keep information about drug, alcohol or mental health treatment confidential. Students fourteen and older have the same confidentiality rights regarding HIV and sexually transmitted diseases.

C. Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, in the event that a child in elementary school is required to attend school under RCW 28A.225.010 or 28A.225.015(1) and has five or more excused absences in a single month during the current school year, or ten or more excused absences in the current school year, the school district shall schedule a conference or conferences with the parent and child at a time reasonably convenient for all persons included for the purpose of identifying the barriers to the child’s regular attendance, and the supports and resources that may be made available to the family so that the child is able to regularly attend school. To satisfy the requirements of this section, the conference must include at least one school district employee such as a nurse, counselor, social worker, teacher, or community human services provider, except in those instances regarding the attendance of a child who has an individualized education program or a plan developed under section 504 of the rehabilitation act of 1973, in which case the reconvening of the team that created the program or plan is required.

This conference is not required if the school has received prior notice or a doctor’s note has been provided and an academic plan put in place so that the child does not fall behind.

Unexcused Absences
A. Any absence from school for the majority of hours or periods in an average school day is unexcused unless it meets one of the criteria above for an excused absence.

B. As a means of instilling values of responsibility and personal accountability, a student whose absence is not excused will experience the consequences of his/her absence. A student’s grade may be affected if a graded activity or assignment occurs during the period of time when the student is absent.

C. The school will notify a student’s parent or guardian in writing or by telephone whenever the student has failed to attend school after one unexcused absence within any month during the current school year. The notification will include the potential consequences of additional unexcused absences. The school will make reasonable efforts to provide this information in a language the parent understands.

D. The school will hold a conference with the parent or guardian after three unexcused absences within any month during the current school year. The conference will analyze the causes of the student’s absences and develop a plan that identifies student, school, and family commitments to reduce the student’s absences from school. If the parent does not attend the conference, the school official may still hold the conference with the student. However, the school will notify the parent of the steps the district has decided to take to eliminate or reduce the student’s absences.

E. Between the student’s second and fifth unexcused absence, the school must take the following data-informed steps:
I. Middle and high school students will be administered the Washington Assessment of the Risks and Needs of Students (WARNS) or other assessment
II. These steps must include, where appropriate, providing an available approved best practice or research-based intervention, or both, consistent with the WARNS profile or other assessment, if an assessment was applied, adjusting the child’s school program or school or course assignment, providing more individualized or remedial instruction, providing appropriate vocational courses or work experience, referring the child to a community truancy board, requiring the child to attend an alternative school or program, or assisting the parent or child to obtain supplementary services that might eliminate or ameliorate the cause or causes for the absence from school.
III. For any child with an existing individualized education plan or 504 plan, these steps must include the convening of the child’s individualized education plan or 504 plan team, including a behavior specialist or mental health specialist where appropriate, to consider the reasons for the absences. If necessary, and if consent from the parent is given, a functional behavior assessment to explore the function of the absence behavior shall be conducted and a detailed behavior plan completed. Time should be allowed for the behavior plan to be initiated and data tracked to determine progress.

Not later than the student’s fifth unexcused absence in a month the district will enter into an agreement with the student and parents that establishes school attendance requirements, refer the student to a community truancy board or file a petition and affidavit with the juvenile court alleging a violation of RCW 28A.225.010.

F. If such action is not successful, the district will file a petition and affidavit with the juvenile court alleging a violation of RCW 28A.225.010 by the parent, student or parent and student no later than the seventh unexcused absence within any month during the current school year or upon the tenth unexcused absence during the current school year.

The superintendent will enforce the district’s attendance policies and procedures. Because the full knowledge and cooperation of students and parents are necessary for the success of the policies and procedures, procedures will be disseminated broadly and made available to parents and students annually.

Students dependent pursuant to Chapter 13.34, RCW
A school district representative or certificated staff member will review unexpected or excessive absences of a student who has been found dependent under the Juvenile Court Act with that student and adults involved with that student. Adults includes the student’s caseworker, educational liaison, attorney if one is appointed, parent or guardians, foster parents and/or the person providing placement for the student. The review will take into consideration the cause of the absences, unplanned school transitions, periods of running from care, in-patient treatment, incarceration, school adjustment, educational gaps, psychosocial issues, and the student’s unavoidable appointments that occur during the school day. The representative or staff member must proactively support the student’s management of their school work.

Migrant Students
The district, parent/guardian and student are encouraged to work to create an Extended Absence Agreement with the school to decrease the risk of an adverse effect on the student’s educational progress.

Grading and Progress Reports
The board believes that the cooperation of school and home is a vital ingredient in the growth and education of the student and recognizes the responsibility to keep parents informed of student welfare and progress in school.

The issuance of grades, written progress reports and parent conferences on a regular schedule serves as the basis for continuous evaluation of the student’s performance and determining changes that should be made to effect improvement. These written and verbal reports shall be designed to provide information that will be helpful to the student, teacher, counselor and parent.

The district shall comply with the marking/grading system incorporated into the statewide standardized high school transcript. Secondary students grade points shall be reported for each term; individually and cumulatively.

The board directs the superintendent to establish a system of reporting student progress and shall require all staff members to comply with such a system as part of their teaching responsibility.

At the beginning of each semester/trimester, each teacher shall specify in writing the student learning goals or standards for his/her respective courses. Participation may be used as a part of students’ grades when the district or state learning goals require it. This will usually be in “performance” classes such as band, shop, theater, etc., though there may be limited performance opportunities in other classes. A student’s grades may be adversely affected by an absence provided the absence occurred on a day when there was a graded participation activity and it is impossible to offer a “make-up” opportunity. Only performance objectives justify the use of attendance and participation in the grading process.

A student’s grade report may be withheld until such time the student pays for any school property that has been lost or willfully damaged. Upon payment for damages or the equivalency through voluntary work, the grade report will be released. The student or his/her parents may appeal the imposition of a charge for damages to the superintendent and board of directors.

Homework
In some cases homework may be a constructive tool in the teaching and learning process when geared to the needs and abilities of students. Homework is defined as assignments that 1) are planned and organized with an identified purpose consistent with state and local standards, 2) are evaluated and returned to students in a timely manner and 3) are formative in nature. Homework may also develop self-discipline and associated good working habits, but that is not its primary purpose and therefore homework may comprise no more than 10% of the final grade.

Promotion/Retention/Academic Failure
The board recognizes that the rate of physical, social, emotional and academic growth will vary among individual students. Since each student grows at his/her own rate, these individual growth characteristics shall be recognized in classroom programming. At the same time, the board recognizes the importance of developing and maintaining the integrity of the district’s instructional program. Within this context, students must be held accountable to achieve high standards in order to ensure a greater chance for success in each succeeding year in school.

Within grades K—8, after a student has completed a year of study at a specific grade level, he/she will be promoted to the next grade. Retention at the same grade may be beneficial to the student when he/she is not demonstrating minimum competency in basic skill subjects in relation to ability and grade level. When making a decision to retain a particular student, that student’s physical, social, emotional and cognitive maturation shall be considered.

The district will utilize a variety of assessment procedures and measures to assess student performance including norm-referenced tests, district-level and classroom -based performance assessments. The district believes that a variety of measures will give the most accurate picture of student performance. Teachers will be trained in the administration of assessments, including tests required by the Washington State Assessment Program. The district will adopt performance assessments as the State Board of Education implements these assessments.

High school promotion will be in accordance with Policy 2410.

The superintendent shall establish procedures that implement this policy.

Cross References:
Attendance
Board Policy 3120 Enrollment
Board Policy 3230 Student Privacy
Board Policy 3240 Student Conduct Expectations and Reasonable Sanctions
Board Policy 3241 Classroom Management, Corrective Actions or Punishment
Board Policy 4218 Language Access Plan
Legal References:
RCW 13.34.300 Failure to cause juvenile to attend school as evidence under neglect petition
RCW 28A.225 Compulsory School Attendance and Admission
WAC 180-16-215 (4) Minimum 180 school day year–Five day Flexibility — Students graduating from high school
WAC 392-400-235 Discipline–Conditions and limitations
WAC 392-400-260 Long-term suspension–Conditions and limitations
WAC 392-401 Statewide definition of excused and unexcused daily absences
Management Resources:
2018 – August Issue
2017 – July Policy Issue
2016 – July Issue
2015 – June Issue
2012 – December Issue
2011 – December Issue
Policy News, June 2001 More Tweaking of Becca Petitions
Grading and Progress Reports
Cross References: Board Policy 3520 Student Fines, Fees and Charges
Board Policy 3230 Student Privacy
Board Policy 3241 Classroom Management, Corrective Actions or punishment
RCW 28A.150.240(2g) Basic Education Act of 1977 — Certificated teaching & administrative staff as accountable for classroom teaching — Scope — Responsibilities — Penalty
RCW 28A.635.060 Defacing or injuring school property — Liability of parent or guardian
RCW 28A.600.030 Grading policies — Option to consider — Attendance
WAC 180-16-215(4) Minimum one hundred eighty school day year
WAC 392-400-235 Discipline—Conditions and limitations
WAC 392-400-260 Long-term suspension—Conditions and limitations
WAC 392-400-235 Discipline — Conditions and limitations
WAC 180-44-010 Responsibilities Related to instruction
WAC 392-415 Secondary Education — Standardized High School Transcript
WAC 392-210 Washington State Honors Award Program
Promotion and Retention
Board Policy 2410 Graduation
Board Policy 2090 Program Evaluation

Note: this policy replaces WSSDA templates for policies 2420 (Grading and Progress Reports), 2421 (Promotion and Retention), 2422 (Homework) and 3122 (Excused and Unexcused Absences).

Adoption Date: 04/28/2011; Updated 09/22/2016; Updated 12/18/18
Raymond School District #116



2423P‑STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

The Raymond School Board recognizes that a combination of many factors affect student achievement. Critical among these are attendance, homework, grading and promotion. It is the district’s goal to ensure that district policy ensures these four areas are mutually supportive in their goal to advance student achievement.

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all assigned classes each day. Teachers shall keep a record of absence and tardiness.

Excused Absences

The following are valid excuses for absences and tardiness. Assignments and/or activities not completed because of an excused absence or tardiness may be made up in the manner provided by the teacher.

A. Participation in school-approved activity. To be excused this absence must be authorized by a staff member and the affected teacher must be notified prior to the absence unless it is clearly impossible to do so.

B. Absence due to illness, health condition, family emergency or religious purposes. When possible, the parent is expected to notify the school office on the morning of the absence and send a signed note of explanation with the student upon his/her return to school. Adult students (those over eighteen) and emancipated students (those over sixteen who have been emancipated by court action) shall notify the school office of their absences with a signed note of explanation. Students fourteen years old or older who are absent from school due to testing or treatment for a sexually transmitted disease shall notify the school of their absence with a signed note of explanation, which will be kept confidential. Students thirteen years and older may do the same for mental health, drug or alcohol treatment; and all students have that right for family planning and abortion. A parent may request that a student be excused from attending school in observance of a religious holiday. In addition, a student, upon the request of his/her parent, may be excused for a portion of a school day to participate in religious instruction provided such is not conducted on school property. A student shall be allowed one makeup day for each day of absence.

C. Absence for parental-approved activities. This category of absence shall be counted as excused for purposes agreed to by the principal and the parent. An absence may not be approved if it causes a serious adverse effect on the student’s educational progress. In participation-type classes (e.g., certain music and physical education classes) the student may not be able to achieve the objectives of the unit of instruction as a result of absence from class. In such a case, a parent-approved absence would have an adverse effect on the student’s educational progress that would ultimately be reflected in the grade for such a course. A student, upon request of his/her parent, may be excused for a portion of a school day to participate in religious instruction provided such is not conducted on school property or otherwise involves the school to any degree.

D. Absence resulting from disciplinary actions–or short-term suspension. As required by law, students who are removed from a class or classes as a disciplinary measure or students who have been placed on short-term suspension shall have the right to make up assignments or exams missed during the time they were denied entry to the classroom if the effect of the missed assignments shall be a substantial lowering of the course grade.

E. Extended illness or health condition. If a student is confined to home or hospital for an extended period, the school shall arrange for the accomplishment of assignments at the place of confinement whenever practical. If the student is unable to do his/her schoolwork, or if there are major requirements of a particular course which cannot be accomplished outside of class, the student may be required to take an incomplete or withdraw from the class without penalty.

F. Excused absence for chronic health condition. Students with a chronic health condition which interrupts regular attendance may qualify for placement in a limited attendance and participation program. The student and his/her parent shall apply to the principal or counselor, and a limited program shall be written following the advice and recommendations of the student’s medical advisor. The limited program must be approved by the principal prior to implementation. Staff shall be informed of the student’s needs, though the confidentiality of medical information shall be respected at the parent’s request.

Required conference for elementary school students

If an elementary school student has five or more excused absences in a single month during the current school year or ten or more excused absences in the current school year, the district will schedule a conference with the student and their parent(s) at a reasonably convenient time. The conference is intended to identify barriers to the student’s regular attendance and to identify supports and resources so the student may regularly attend school.

The conference must include at least one school district employee, preferably a nurse, counselor, social worker, teacher of community human service provider, and may occur on the same day as the scheduled parent-teacher conference, provided it takes place within thirty days of the absences. If the student has an Individualized Education Program or a Section 504 Plan, the team that created that program must reconvene. A conference is not required if prior notice of the excused absences was provided to the district or if a doctor’s note has been provided and a plan is in place to ensure the student will not fall behind in their coursework.

Unexcused absences

An “unexcused absence” means that a student has failed to attend the majority of hours or periods in an average school day or has failed to comply with a more restrictive school district policy on absences, or has failed to comply with alternative learning experience program attendance requirements.

Unexcused absences occur when:

  1. The parent, guardian or adult student submits an excuse that does not meet the definition of an excused absence as defined above; or
  2. The parent, guardian or adult student fails to submit any type of excuse statement, whether by phone, e-mail or in writing, for an absence.

Each unexcused absence within any month of the current school year will be followed by a letter or phone call to the parent informing them of the consequences of additional unexcused absences. The school will make reasonable efforts to provide this information in a language in which the parent is fluent. A student’s grade will not be affected if no graded activity is missed during such an absence.

After three unexcused absences within any month of the current school year, a conference will be held between the principal, student and parent to analyze the causes of the student’s absenteeism. If a regularly scheduled parent-teacher conference is scheduled to take place within thirty days of the third unexcused absence, the district may schedule the attendance conference on the same day.  If the parent/guardian does not attend the scheduled conference, the conference may be conducted with the student and principal. However, the parent will be notified of the steps to be taken to eliminate or reduce the student’s absences.

At some point after the second and before the fifth unexcused absence, the district will take data-informed steps to eliminate or reduce the student’s absences. In middle school and high school, these steps will include application of the Washington Assessment of the Risks and Needs of Students (WARNS) or other assessment by the district’s designated employee.

For any student with an existing Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 Plan, these steps will include convening the student’s IEP team or Section 504 team, including a behavior specialist or mental health specialist where appropriate, to consider the reasons for the student’s absences. If necessary, and if the student’s parent gives consent, the district will conduct a functional behavior assessment and will compete a detailed behavior plan to explore the function of the absence behavior.

For any student who does not have an IEP or Section 504 Plan, but who is reasonably believed to have a mental or physical disability or impairment, these steps will include informing the student’s parent/guardian of the right to obtain an appropriate evaluation at no cost to the parent to determine whether the student has a disability or impairment and needs accommodations, special education services, or related services. This includes students with suspected emotional or behavioral disabilities. If the school obtains consent to conduct an evaluation, time should be allowed for the evaluation to be completed, and if the student is found to be eligible for accommodations, special education services, or related services, a plan will be developed to address the student’s needs.

The district will designate a staff member to apply the Washington Assessment of the Risks and Needs of Students (WARNS) and, where appropriate, provide the student with best practice or research-based interventions consistent with WARNS. As appropriate, the district will also consider:

  • adjusting the student’s course assignments;
  • providing the student more individualized instruction;
  • providing appropriate vocational courses or work experience;
  • requiring the student to attend an alternative school or program;
  • assisting the parent or student to obtain supplementary services; or
  • referring the student to a community truancy board.

If the student’s parent/guardian does not attend the conference, the conference may be conducted with the student and school official. However, the parent will be notified of the steps taken to eliminate or reduce the student’s absences.

Transfers

In the case of a student who transfers from one district to another during the school year, the sending district will provide to the receiving district, together with a copy of the WARNS assessment and any interventions previously provided to the student, the most recent truancy information for that student. The information will include the online or written acknowledgment by the parent and student. The sending district will use the standard choice transfer form for releasing a student to a nonresident school district for the purposes of accessing an alternative learning experience program.

Not later than a student’s fifth unexcused absence in a month, the district will:

a. enter into an agreement with the student and parents/guardians that establishes school attendance requirements;
b. refer the student to a community truancy board; or
c. file a petition to juvenile court (see below).

Community Truancy Board

A “community truancy board” means a board established pursuant to a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between a juvenile court and the school district and composed of members of the local community in which the student attends school. The district will enter into an MOU with the juvenile court in Pacific County to establish a community truancy board prior to the 2017-2018 school year.

The district will designate and identify to the juvenile court (and update as necessary) and to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction a staff member to coordinate district efforts to address excessive absenteeism and truancy, including outreach and conferences, coordinating the MOU, establishing protocols and procedures with the court, coordinating trainings, sharing evidence-based and culturally appropriate promising practices. The district will also identify a person within each school to serve as a contact regarding excessive absenteeism and truancy and assisting in the recruitment of community truancy board members.

Not later than a student’s seventh unexcused absence within any month during the current school year, or a tenth unexcused absence during the current school year, if the district’s attempts to substantially reduce a student’s absences have not been successful and if the student is under the age of seventeen, the district will file a petition and supporting affidavit for a civil action in juvenile court.

Petition to juvenile court

The petition will contain the following:

  1. A statement that the student has unexcused absences in the current school year. (While petitions must be filed if the student has seven or more unexcused absences within any one month, or ten or more unexcused absences in the current school year, a petition may be filed earlier. Unexcused absences accumulated in another school or school will be counted when preparing the petition);
  2. An attestation that actions taken by the school district have not been successful in substantially reducing the student’s absences from school;
  3. A statement that court intervention and supervision are necessary to assist the school district to reduce the student’s absences from school;
  4. A statement that RCW 28A.225.010 has been violated by the parent, student or parent and student;
  5. The student’s name, date of birth, school, address, gender, race and ethnicity; and the names and addresses of the student’s parents/guardians, whether the student and parent are fluent in English, whether there is an existing individualized education program (IEP) and the student’s current academic status in school;
  6. A list of all interventions that have been attempted, a copy of any previous truancy assessment completed by the student’s current school district, the history of approved best practices intervention or research-based intervention(s) previously provided to the student by the district, and a copy of the most recent truancy information document provided to the parent.
  7.  Facts that support the above allegations.

Petitions may be served by certified mail, return receipt requested, but if such service is unsuccessful, personal service is required. At the district’s choice, it may be represented by a person who is not an attorney at hearings related to truancy petitions.

If the allegations in the petition are established by a preponderance of the evidence, the court shall grant the petition and enter an order assuming jurisdiction to intervene for a period of time determined by the court, after considering the facts alleged in the petition and the circumstances of the student, to most likely cause the student to return to and remain in school while the student is subject to the court’s jurisdiction.

If the court assumes jurisdiction, the school district will periodically report to the court any additional unexcused absences by the student, actions taken by the school district, and an update on the student’s academic status in school at a schedule specified by the court. The first report must be received no later than three (3) months from the date that the court assumes jurisdiction.

Discipline and corrective action

All sanctions imposed for failure to comply with the attendance policies and procedures will be implemented in conformance with state and district regulations regarding discipline or corrective action. (See WSSDA policy 3241, Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action.)

Students who have excessive unexcused absences, as determined by the principal, may be excluded from any field trips or off-campus activities that do not have a strong academic focus.

Students are expected to be in class on time. When a student’s tardiness becomes frequent or disruptive, the teacher of the class in which the tardy occurred shall immediately talk to the student and have that student call his/her parent at that time. The three of them shall agree to a plan to stop the tardiness. If the tardiness continues, the student shall be referred to the principal or counselor. If counseling, parent conferencing or disciplinary action is ineffective in changing the student’s attendance behavior, the principal shall determine the best method for the student to make up any time that was missed.

All sanctions imposed for failure to comply with the attendance policies and procedures shall be implemented in conformance with state and district regulations regarding corrective action or punishment. (See policy 3241.)

Attendance Procedures in Raymond Junior/Senior High

Regular and punctual attendance on the part of all students is necessary for success in school. When students are absent, parents are responsible for providing an explanatory note. (Students who are 18 or older, with parental permission, shall fulfill the role of parents as described below.)

Excused absences shall be granted for the following:

  1. Parental Excuses—Each student will be allowed up to 3 days per semester that can be excused by the parent. Parental notes will be allowed as proof of the excused absence. Additional parental excuses may be recorded as “unaccepted” and result in detention and/or Saturday school as determined appropriate by the principal.
  2. Medical—If the student brings a doctor’s statement or a health department statement indicating that the student was absent because of illness, the absent will be excused. An authentic medical note or letter must be provided with a phone number of a doctor for verification. A doctor’s excuse will not count as one of the 3 parental excused absences allowed each semester. The principal or designee may place calls to verify parental and medical notes.
  3. Prearranged—Prearranged absences may be approved by the principal for a valid educational opportunity, educational travel, religious events, and/or death.
  4. Unavoidable—If the three parental excused absences per semester have been used, “unavoidable excused absences” may be granted by the principal as a result of a parent conference. Parents should call the prior to the student’s return to school to schedule the conference. A parent conference with the principal or designee may or may not result in the absence being excused.
  5. Unexcused or unaccepted absences will result in a score of “0” for any assessment missed as a result of the absence. Students who choose to do so may make up these assessments during all-school detention or Saturday school, as it is available.

Grades, Progress Reports and Homework

It is the goal of the Raymond School District to move from a 20th-Century grading model to one based on current best research and best practices. Specifically, teachers and administrators shall make this transition as described:

FROM Sorting students  TO Educating each student to his/her highest potential
FROM Emphasizing what is taught  TO Emphasizing what is learned
FROM Assessing in order to assign grades  TO Assessing in order to know how to proceed

While recognizing that grading plays a role in such things as post-secondary planning, motivation and various administrative functions, the primary purpose of grades is to give feedback to students, teachers and parents regarding the progress of the student toward identified academic objectives. Teachers shall then use that information to adjust instruction appropriately, allowing the student the maximum opportunity for academic growth. Grades are to reflect the academic achievement level as indicated by summative assessments, with a maximum of 10% based on formative assessments. Other means of reporting, such as report card comments or work habit scores, will be used to communicate non-academic achievement or growth areas.

Teachers should use a guideline of no more than 10 minutes of homework per night per grade, i.e., a 3rd-grader would have no more than 30 minutes of homework per night. High school students should have no more than two hours of homework per night. In general, when proper homework procedures are used, homework is more associated with increased achievement as the student gets older. In other words, secondary students benefit more from homework than primary students. Teachers’ homework practices should reflect this reality.

Homework is considered a formative assessment in that it identifies learning objective(s) and the student receives specific feedback that helps the student know how to improve. Whether or not a student completes his/her homework may directly affect up to 10% of that student’s academic grade. Responding to homework in a “check off” fashion is specifically prohibited.

Homework may be assigned for one or more of the following purposes:

A. Practice (help students to master specific skills that have been presented in class)

B. Preparation (help students gain the maximum benefits from future lessons)

C. Extension (to provide students with opportunities to transfer specific skills or concepts to new situations)

D. Creativity (to require students to integrate many skills and concepts in order to produce original responses)

The purposes of homework assignments, the basis for evaluating the work performed and the guidelines and/or rules shall be made clear to the student at the time of the assignment.

The school principal shall establish guidelines that clarify the nature and use of homework assignments to improve school achievement.

Meeting Grade Standards

Because teaching staff needs to be able to calculate and enter semester grades in a timely manner, teachers may set reasonable final deadlines for all make-up or re-take tests and/or other summative projects to be completed. (Such a deadline could, for example, be one calendar week before the end of the semester.) Teachers who choose to do so can continue to allow tests until the last day of the quarter. Once a teacher decides on his or her final deadline, he or she should communicate that deadline to the students as soon as possible.

Students who have failed to either meet a standard or to attain the level of success that they desire may make arrangements with their teacher to make further attempts to demonstrate mastery of the standard. It is the students’ responsibility to make arrangements in a timely manner with the teacher to begin the process. Working with the principal’s guidance, teacher may set reasonable limits for initiating a “re-take” process. (For instance, a teacher might have a requirement that students must start pursuing a re-take within two weeks of the student’s receiving the original grade.) If teachers choose to allow retakes outside of the two-week window, they may require the assessment be retaken at all-school detention or Saturday school.

Once a student begins the procedure, he or she may continue to attempt to meet a standard until the semester’s end or the established deadline, as long as he or she continues to show a good faith effort to achieve. Students who wish to re-do summative assessments should expect to first fulfill some obligatory expectations to demonstrate an effort to learn the material. For example, the student may be required to make up previously missed formative work relating to the material being assessed, do extra review formative work, or meet with the teacher before or after school to review the material. Students should not expect to simply re-take the same test multiple times until the results improve.

Students who need to make up a summative measurement of a standard that was missed due to absence will have until the end of the semester or until the established deadline to complete all summative assessments.

Grade Point Averages

The grade point averages for grades 9-12 shall be calculated in the following manner:

A. Each student’s “grade point average” shall be the sum of the point values, of all the marks/grades received for all courses attempted divided by the sum of the credits for all courses attempted. The grade point value shall be calculated by multiplying the numerical value of the mark/grade earned by the number of credits assigned to the course.

B. The numerical values of grades are:

A = 4.0
A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3
B = 3.0
B- = 2.7 E
C+ = 2.3
C = 2.0
C- = 1.7
D+ = 1.3
D = 1.0
F = 0.0

The minimal passing mark/grade is D = 1.0. Pass/fail, credit/no credit, and satisfactory/unsatisfactory marks may also be used. These non-numerical marks/grades shall be clearly identified and excluded from the calculation of grade point average.

C. Marks/grades for each course taken shall be included in the calculation of grade point averages. Only the highest mark/grade for a class/course taken more than once to improve a mark/grade shall be included in the calculation of grade point averages. Grade point averages shall be rounded to two decimal places and reported for each trimester/semester or other term and for the cumulative credits earned for all courses attempted in high school.

The standardized high school transcript shall contain:

  • The student’s name (last name, first name, and middle names or middle initials);
  • The student’s current address, address at graduation, or address at withdrawal from school (street, city, state, zip code);
  • The student’s birth date and sex;
  • The student’s identification number (if applicable);
  • The school’s name;
  • The school’s address (street, city, state zip code, and telephone number);
  • The dates of the student’s entry, reentry, withdrawal, and graduation (if applicable) related to the school issuing the transcript;
  • The student’s academic history for high school (grade level and date of course completion, course titles, marks/grades earned, credits attempted, and grade point average);
  • The name and address of parent(s) or guardian(s) (street, city, state, zip code) if such information is available;
  • A list of previous high schools attended (school name, address, city, state, and month and year of entrance and exit); and
  • The signature and/or seal of the authorized school official (name, title, and date).

Promotion/Retention/Academic Failure

Parental approval is not required to retain or promote a student. Parents who disagree with a retention decision may appeal to the superintendent no later than 25 June.

Grades K—6

Prior to the end of the third quarter, the teacher will confer with the principal regarding any student who should be considered for retention. Parents/guardians shall be invited to meet with the principal and teacher. Information will be presented to explain the student’s progress to date. A written student improvement plan will be developed and signed by those present.

At least two (2) weeks prior to the end of the school year, the parent, principal and teacher will again meet to review the latest progress and determine if the student would be best served by promotion or retention. A student’s retention is based on recommendation of the classroom teacher, achievement data and the “Light’s Retention Scale”.

Grades 7—12

It is critical to student academic success that communication between students, teachers, administrators and parents be clear and frequent. The following procedures will ensure that this goal is met:

• As of Tuesday of each week, students whose academic grade falls below a “C-“ will receive an academic intervention referral from their teacher(s) no later than Wednesday. This referral shall include 1) what the student must do to achieve academic success and 2) what steps the teacher has already completed to remedy the situation (spoken to students, contacted parents, offered after-school help, etc.).
• The Dean of Students will review the referral and determine the proper course of action, (i.e., staffing, after-school help, turning in missing work, etc.) using the RHS Academic Intervention Ladder as a guide and note the action to be taken in the student information system no later than Friday. The student, parents and relevant coaches and teachers will be informed as to what the student will do to correct the situation.
• If the grade has not improved to at least a “C-“ by the next Tuesday, the Dean of Students will organize a staffing for the student, teacher(s) and parents in order to articulate a learning contract.
Progress reports shall be issued, at a minimum, at the mid-term and term. Report cards will be issued at the end of each semester.

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