4000 Series

4000—PUBLIC INFORMATION PROGRAM

Public Information Program

The district will strive to maintain effective two-way communication channels with the public. Such channels will enable the board and staff to interpret the school’s performance and needs to the community and provide a means for citizens to express their needs and expectations to the board and staff.

The superintendent will establish and maintain a communication process within the school system and between it and the community. Such a public information program will provide for a district annual report, news releases at appropriate times, news media coverage of district programs and events, and regular direct communication between individual schools and the community members they serve. The public information program will also assist staff in improving their skill and understanding in communicating with the public.

Community opinion may be solicited through parent organizations, parent-teacher conferences, open houses and other such events or activities which may bring staff and citizens together. At times, board meetings may be scheduled at neighborhood schools. Survey instruments and/or questionnaires may be developed in order to gain a broad perspective of community opinion.

The board is a nonpartisan public body and as such will not endorse political candidates. Neither staff nor students will be asked to disseminate campaign materials from the schools nor will any of the district’s facilities or communications services be used to disseminate such material.

The superintendent will identify staff who have significant public information responsibilities and establish guidelines for their work. The guidelines will address such matters as authority for making releases and the nature and content of bulletins to parents.

Staff Communications with the Public

Staff share the responsibility for communicating and interpreting the district mission, its policies, programs, goals and objectives to members of the community in a way that is consistent with Board and administrative goals. Staff will perform their services and functions to the best of their ability and communicate with members of the community, parents, students and other staff in a sincere, courteous and considerate manner. It is not the role of staff to communicate to the public their dissatisfaction with district policy, procedures or other staff members. Such dissatisfaction is to be dealt with in accordance with Policy 5270 and pertinent negotiated agreements. Staff will strive to develop and maintain cooperative school-community relations and to achieve the understanding and mutual respect that are essential to the success of the district.

Confidential information about students or other staff will be released only as permitted by statute and district policies and procedures.

Collection Of Disciplinary Data

The district will collect data on student disciplinary actions taken in each school, and the information will be available to the public on request. This information may not be personally identifiable, and will not include a student’s name, address or social security number.

District Annual Report

An annual report addressing the activities of the school district and the administration’s recommendations for improvement of student learning and district operations will be prepared by the superintendent and presented to the board as soon as possible after the close of each school year. Upon board approval, the report will be made available to the public and used as one means for informing parents and community members, the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and other districts in the area, of the programs and conditions of the district’s schools. The district is required to ensure awareness of and compliance with certain statutory requirements as specified in model policy 2106, Program Compliance. When the district is not in compliance, such deviations will be incorporated into the annual report.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2106 Program Compliance
Board Policy 4020 Confidential Communications

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.230 Basic education act — District school directors’ responsibilities

Management Resources:
Policy News, October 2011 Policy Manual Revisions

Adoption Date: 12/12/11
Raymond School District #116



4000P—PUBLIC INFORMATION PROGRAM

Principals are encouraged to initiate media coverage of their school programs and activities. The superintendent shall authorize the release of information when the topic being covered involves more than one building. The following guidelines relate to the public information program:

A. Media representatives shall be supplied factual information with the request that they not publish or broadcast any facts which are injurious to staff or students or which would serve no constructive purpose.

B. Media representatives should be kept fully informed on all aspects of the program so that any reporting shall be done on the basis of a complete and accurate overview.

C. Student should be informed that they have the right to deny an interview or photograph. A release form signed by a parent shall be secured before allowing an individual to photograph and conduct an interview that would “single out” any special education student or identify a student whose parents have signed a form to withhold directory information.

D. During regular school hours, all media representatives must report to the building office for identification and authorization before going to any part of the building or contacting any individual.

E. Staff members shall secure authorization from the principal before contacting the media on behalf of the school. This shall not preclude a staff member from contacting the media as a private individual.

Annual District Report

The Annual District Report shall include but not be limited to:

A. Criteria used for staff evaluations;

B. A summary of the student performance towards Washington State Essential Learning Requirements;

C. Results of district-wide achievement testing;

D. Budget information, including student enrollment, classroom staff, support staff, administrative staff, and special levy expenditures.



4010—STAFF COMMUNICATIONS RESPONSIBILITY

Staff share the responsibility for communicating and interpreting the district mission, its policies, programs, goals and objectives to members of the community. Staff shall perform their services and functions to the best of their ability and communicate with members of the community, parents, students and other staff in a sincere, courteous and considerate manner. Staff shall strive to develop and maintain cooperative school-community relations and to achieve the understanding and mutual respect that are essential to the success of any organization.

Confidential information about students or other staff shall be released only as permitted by statute and district policies and procedures.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 4020 Confidential Communications

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4020—CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATIONS

The board recognizes that school staff must exercise a delicate balance regarding the treatment of information that was revealed in confidence. A staff member may, in his/her professional judgment, treat information received from a student as confidential while at other times decide to disclose what was learned to the school administration, law enforcement officers (including child protective services), the county health department, other staff members or the student’s parents. The staff member should advise the student regarding the limitations and restrictions regarding confidentiality. The student should be encouraged to reveal confidences to his/her parents. If the staff member intends to disclose the confidence, the student should be informed prior to such action.

The following guidelines are established to assist staff members in making appropriate decisions regarding confidential information and/or communications:

A. Information contained in the student’s cumulative record folder is confidential and is only accessible through the custodian of student records. Information secured through the authorization of the records custodian shall remain confidential and be used only for the purpose that its access was granted.

B. While certain professionals may have a legal confidential relationship as in attorney-client communications, school staff members including counselors (except licensed psychologists) do not possess a confidentiality privilege.

C. A staff member is expected to reveal information given by a student when there is a reasonable likelihood that a crime has or will be committed, (e.g., child abuse, sale of drugs, suicidal ideation).

D. A staff member shall exercise professional judgment regarding the sharing of student disclosed information when there is reasonable likelihood that the student’s welfare may be endangered.

E. If district officials determine there is a specific threat to the health or safety of a student or any other individual, it may disclose otherwise confidential student information to appropriate parties, as allowed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

F. A staff member is encouraged to assist the student by offering suggestions regarding the availability of community services to assist a student in dealing with personal matters, (e.g. substance abuse, mental illness, sexually-transmitted diseases, pregnancy). The staff member should encourage the student to discuss such matters with his/her parents. Staff members are encouraged to discuss problems of this nature with the school principal prior to making contact with others.

Cross References:
Board Policy 2140 Guidance and Counseling
Board Policy 2121 Drug and Alcohol Use/Abuse Program
Board Policy 3231 Student Records
Board Policy 4040 Public Access to District Records
Board Policy 5260 Personnel Records

Legal References:
RCW 26.44.030 Reports — Duty and authority to make — Duty of receiving agency

Adoption Date: 04/22/10
Raymond School District #116



4040‑PUBLIC ACCESS TO DISTRICT RECORDS

Consistent with Washington State law, the Board is committed to providing the public full access to records concerning the administration and operations of the District. Such access promotes important public policy, maintains public confidence in the fairness of governmental processes, and protects the community’s interest in the control and operation of its common school district. At the same time, the Board desires to preserve the efficient administration of government and acknowledges the privacy rights of individuals whose records may be maintained by the District. This policy and the accompanying procedure are intended to facilitate access to school district records without compromising operational efficiency or privacy rights.

As used in this policy and the accompanying procedure, “school district records” is a broad term that includes any writing containing information relating to the conduct of the District or the performance of any District governmental or proprietary function prepared, owned, used, or retained by the District regardless of physical form or characteristics. A “writing” as used in this policy and procedure is likewise a broad term that means any handwriting, typewriting, printing, photocopying, photographing, or other means of recording any form of communication or representation. Included within these definitions are digital and electronic forms of communication, including emails, texts or messages through any medium or application, pages, postings and comments from any District-operated or District-sponsored website.  The District will retain public records in compliance with state law and regulations.

The definition of “school district records” does not include records that are not otherwise required to be retained by the District and are held by volunteers who do not service in an administrative capacity, have not been appointed by the District to a District board, commission, or internship, and do not have a supervisory role or delegated District authority.

Because of the tremendous volume and diversity of records continuously generated by a public school district, the Board has declared by formal resolution that trying to maintain a current index of all of the District’s records would be impracticable, unduly burdensome, and ultimately interfere with the operational work of the District. Additionally, the Board hereby finds that it would be unduly burdensome to calculate the costs of producing public records, given the multiple different electronic and manual devices used to produce public records, as well as the fluctuating costs of District supplies and labor.

The Superintendent will develop—and the Board will periodically review—procedures consistent with state law that will facilitate this policy. The Superintendent will also appoint a Public Records Officer who will serve as a point of contact for members of the public who request the disclosure of public records.  The Public Records Officer will be trained in the laws and regulations governing the retention and disclosure of records, and shall oversee the District’s compliance with this policy and state law.

Cross References:
3231 – Student Records

Legal References:
Chapter 5.60 RCW WITNESSES — COMPETENCY
Chapter 13.04.155(3) RCW Notification to school principal of conviction, adjudication, or diversion agreement — Provision of information to teachers and other personnel — Confidentiality.
Chapter 26.44.010 RCW Declaration of purpose.
Chapter 26.44.030(9) RCW Reports — Duty and authority to make — Duty of receiving agency — Duty to notify — Case planning and consultation — Penalty for unauthorized exchange of information — Filing dependency petitions — Investigations — Interviews of children — Records — Risk assessment process.
Chapter 28A.605.030 RCW Student education records — Parental review — Release of records — Procedure.
Chapter 28A.635.040 RCW Examination questions — Disclosing — Penalty.
Chapter 40.14 RCW Preservation and destruction of public records
Chapter 42.17A RCW Campaign Disclosure and Contribution
Chapter 42.56 RCW Public Records Act
WAC 392-172A Rules for the provision of special education
Public Law 98-24, Section 527 of the Public Health Services Act, 42 USC 290dd-2
20 U.S.C. 1232g Federal Education Rights Privacy Act (FERPA)
20 U.S.C. 1400 et. seq. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
42 U.S.C. 1758(b)(6)
34 CFR Part 300—ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES
45 CFR Part 160—164—GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS AND SECURITY AND PRIVACY

Management Resources:
2017 – July Issue
2015 – December Issue
2015 – April Issue
2012 – April Issue
2010 – February Issue
Policy News, June 2006
Policy News, October 2005
Washington State Office of the Attorney General – Open Government Training
Washington State Office of the Attorney General – Model Rules on Public Disclosure

Adoption Date: 10/26/17
Raymond School District #116



4040P‑Public Access to District Records

PURPOSE OF THESE PROCEDURES AND GENERAL PRINCIPLES

These procedures have been established by the Superintendent and published pursuant to Board Policy 4040 and RCW 42.56.040 to explain the process for public access to school district records and to provide guidance in how the District will respond to such requests.

School district records relating to the conduct of operations and functions of the District that have been prepared, owned, used, or retained by the District in any format are, in fact, public records to which members of the public may request access consistent with this procedure.

When processing such requests, the District will provide the fullest assistance to the requestor and provide a response in the most timely manner possible.

DISTRICT PUBLIC RECORDS OFFICER

Public Records Officer

For the most timely and efficient response, requests for school district records should be directed in writing to the Public Records Officer listed below, whose responsibilities include serving as a point of contact for members of the public in this process and overseeing the District’s compliance with the Washington Public Records Act, Chapter 42.56 RCW, and Policy 4040.

The current Public Records Officer of the District may be reached at the District’s Central Administrative Building as follows:

Dr. Steve Holland
360-942-3415, option 4
360-942-3416
sholland@raymondk12.org

Information regarding contacting the Public Records Officer is also available at the District website at raymondk12.org.

Public Records Officer Training

Consistent with state law, the Public Records Officer shall complete trainings related to the Washington Public Records Act and public records retention no later than ninety (90) days after assuming the responsibilities of the Public Records Officer.  After the initial training(s), the Public Records Officer must complete refresher training at intervals of no more than four years as long as he or she remains the District’s Public Records Officer. Training must address particular issues related to the retention, production, and disclosure of electronic documents, including updating and improving technology information services.

AVAILABILITY OF PUBLIC RECORDS

Hours for Inspection

Public records are available for inspection and copying during normal business hours of the District, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., during the school year, and 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., on days school is not in session, excluding legal holidays.  Records must be inspected at the offices of the District.

Organization of Records

The District will maintain its records in a reasonable, organized manner and take reasonable actions to protect records from damage and disorganization. A requestor shall not take District records from District offices without the permission of the Public Records Officer or designee.  During the inspection of records, a District employee will typically be present to protect records from damage or disorganization.

The District will also maintain a log of public records requests that have been submitted to and processed by the District. This log shall include, but not be limited to, the following information for each request: The identity of the requestor if provided, the date the request was received, the text of the original request, a description of the records produced in response to the request, a description of the records redacted or withheld and the reasons therefor, and the date of the final disposition of the request.

Information Online

A variety of records and information are available on the District website at [INSERT WEB ADDRESS] Requestors are encouraged to view the documents available on the website prior to submitting a records request.

MAKING A REQUEST FOR PUBLIC RECORDS

Request to Public Records Officer

Any person wishing to inspect or copy public records of the District shall make the request in person during the District’s normal office hours, or in writing by letter, fax, or email addressed to the Public Records Officer and including the following information:

Name, address, telephone number, and email address of requestor;
Identification of the public records adequate for the Public Records Officer or designee to locate the records; and
The date the request is submitted to the District.

Identifiable Records

A request under the Washington Public Records Act, Chapter 42.56 RCW and District Policy 4040 must seek an identifiable record or identifiable records.  A request for all or substantially all of the records prepared, owned, used, or retained by the District is not a valid request for identifiable records. General requests for information from the District that do not seek identifiable records are also not covered by Policy 4040.   A request for all records discussing a particular topic or containing a particular keyword or name will not be considered a request for all of the District’s records.

Requesting Electronic Records

The process for requesting electronic public records is the same as for requesting paper public records. However, to assist the District in responding to a request for electronic records, a requestor should provide specific search terms that will allow the Public Records Officer or designee to locate and assemble identifiable records responsive to the request.

Creating New Records

The District is not obligated by law to create a new record to satisfy a records request for information.  The District may choose to create a record depending on the nature of the request and the convenience of providing the information in a new document, such as when data from multiple locations is requested and can be more easily combined into a single new record.

Copies of Records

If the requestor wishes to have copies of the records made instead of inspecting them, he or she shall make this clear in the request and make arrangements to pay for copies of the records or a deposit.

Requests Not in Writing

The Public Records Officer or designee may accept informal requests for public records by telephone or in person.  To avoid any confusion or misunderstanding, however, requestors should be mindful that a request reduced to writing is always the preferred method.  If the Public Records Officer or designee receives a request by telephone or in person, the Public Records Officer will confirm his or her understanding of the request with the requestor in writing.

PROCESSING OF PUBLIC RECORDS REQUESTS

Order of Processing Requests

The District will typically process requests in the order received.  However, requests may also be processed out of order if doing so allows the most requests to be processed in the most efficient manner.

Central Review

Records requests not made to the Public Records Officer of the District will be forwarded by building level administrators, program administrators, or other staff receiving the request to the Public Records Officer for processing.

Five-Day Response

Within five (5) business days of receipt of a request, the Public Records Officer will do one or more of the following:

  1. Provide copies of the record(s) requested or make the record available for inspection—or, in the alternative, provide an internet address and link to the District’s website where the specific record can be accessed (provided that the requestor has not notified the District that he or she cannot access the records through the internet) ; or
  2. Acknowledge that the District has received the request and provide a reasonable estimate of the time it will require to fully respond; or
  3. Acknowledge that the District has received the request, and ask the requestor to provide clarification for a request that is unclear, while providing to the greatest extent possible a reasonable estimate of the time the District will require to respond to the request if it is not clarified; or
  4. Deny the request (although no request will be denied solely on the basis that the request is overbroad).

If the requestor fails to respond to the District’s request for clarification within 30 days and the entire request is unclear, the District may close the request and not further respond to it. If the requestor fails to respond to the District’s request for clarification within 30 days, and part of the request is unclear, the District will respond to the portion of the request that is clear and may close the remainder of the request. In unusual circumstances, the District may also seek a court order enjoining disclosure pursuant to law.

The District may deny a bot request that is one of multiple requests from the requestor within a twenty-four hour period if the District establishes that responding to the multiple bot requests would cause excessive interference with the District’s other essential functions. The District may deem a request to be a bot request when the District reasonably believes the request was automatically generated by a computer program or script.

If the District does not respond in writing within five business days of receipt of the request for disclosure, the requestor should contact the Public Records Officer to determine the reason for the failure to respond.

Purpose of Request

The District may inquire into the purpose for which a record is requested and may use the answer to aid in gathering responsive records and determining whether the public has a legitimate interest in obtaining the information.  However, a requester is not required to provide a purpose and the District may not decline to furnish the records solely because the requester refuses to furnish a purpose for the request.

Protecting Rights of Others

In the event that the requested records contain information that may affect rights of others and may be arguably exempt from disclosure, the Public Records Officer may, prior to providing the records, give notice to such others.  The notice may make it possible for the others to contact the requestor and ask him or her to revise the request, or, if necessary, seek a court order to prevent or limit the disclosure. The notice to the affected persons may also include a copy of the request.

Records Exempt from Disclosure

Some records are exempt from disclosure, in whole or in part, under a specific exemption contained in chapter 42.56 RCW or another statute which exempts or prohibits disclosure of specific information or records.

If the District believes that a record is exempt from disclosure and should be withheld, the Public Records Officer will state in writing the specific exemption (and statutory section) which applies and provide a brief explanation of how the exemption applies to the record being withheld or redacted.  This exemption and explanation will be provided to the requestor in a withholding index or log.

If only a portion of a record is exempt from disclosure, but the remainder is not exempt, the Public Records Officer will redact the exempt portions, provide the nonexempt portions, and indicate to the requestor why portions of the record are being redacted in the withholding index or log.

List of Laws Exempting or Prohibiting Disclosure

Pursuant to RCW 42.56.070 (2), these rules contain a list of laws—other than those specifically listed in the Washington Public Records Act, Chapter 42.56 RCW—which may exempt disclosure of certain public records or portions of records.  The District has identified the following laws:

  • The Family Educational and Privacy Rights Act (FERPA), 20 USC § 1232g (regarding student educational records);
  • Washington State Student Education Records Law, RCW 28A.605.030;
  • The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 20 U.S.C. § 1400 et. seq. and 34 C.F.R. Part 300 (protecting the confidentiality of personally identifying information contained in student records of students with disabilities).
  • Privileged communications and attorney work product, such as set forth in Chapter 5.60 RCW;
  • Criminal Records Privacy Act (CRPA), Chapter 10.97, RCW;
  • Information on students receiving free or reduced lunch, 42 USC § 1758(b)(6);
  • Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), 45 CFR parts 160-164 (regarding health care information privacy and security);
  • Abuse of Children – Protection and Procedure, RCW 26.44.010; RCW 26.44.030(9);
  • Notification of Juvenile Offenders, RCW 13.04.155(3);
  • Examination question for teachers or pupils prior to the examination, RCW 28A.635.040;
  • Public Law 98-24, Section 527 of the Public Health Services Act, 41 USC § 290dd-2 (confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records);
  • United States and Washington Constitutional provisions including, but not limited to, the right of privacy and freedom of association.

In addition to these exemptions, RCW 42.56.070 (9) prohibits providing access to lists of individuals requested for commercial purposes, and the District may not do so unless specifically authorized or directed by law.

The above list is for informational purposes only and is not intended to cover all possible exemptions from the public records law. The above list includes only exemptions which may be in addition to those set forth in Chapter 42.56 RCW. Under appropriate circumstances, the District may rely upon other legal exemptions which are not set forth above or contained within the public disclosure law.

Inspection of Records

Consistent with other demands, and without unreasonably disrupting District operations, the District shall promptly provide for the inspection of nonexempt public records. No member of the public may remove a document from the viewing area without the permission of the Public Records Officer, nor may he or she disassemble or alter any document.  The requestor shall indicate which documents he or she wishes the District to copy.  There is no cost to inspect District records.

Providing Copies of Non-electronic Records

After inspection is complete, the Public Records Officer or designee shall make the requested copies or arrange for copying.

Providing Electronic Records

When a requestor requests records in an electronic format, the Public Records Officer or designee will provide the nonexempt records or portions of such records that are reasonably locatable in an electronic format that is used by the District and is generally commercially available, or in a format that is reasonably translatable from the format in which the District keeps the record.

Providing Records in Installments

When the request is for a large number of records, the Public Records Officer or designee has the right to provide access for inspection and copying in installments. If, within thirty (30) days, the requestor fails to inspect the entire set of records or one or more of the installments, the Public Records Officer or designee may stop searching for the remaining records and close the request as discussed further below.

Completion of Inspection

When the inspection of the requested records is complete and all requested copies are provided, the Public Records Officer or designee will indicate that the District has completed a diligent search for the requested records and made any located nonexempt records available for inspection.

Closing Withdrawn or Abandoned Request

The requestor must claim or review the assembled records within thirty (30) days of the District’s notification to him or her that the records are available for inspection or copying. The District should notify the requestor in writing of this requirement and inform the requestor that he or she should contact the District to make arrangements to claim or review the records. If the requestor or a representative of the requestor fails to claim or review the records within the thirty-day period or make other arrangements, the District may close the request and refile the assembled records.

When the requestor either withdraws the request or fails to fulfill his or her obligations to inspect the records or pay the deposit or final payment for the requested copies, the Public Records Officer will close the request and indicate to the requestor that the District has closed the request.

Later Discovered Documents

If, after the District has informed the requestor that it has provided all available records, the District becomes aware of additional responsive documents existing at the time of the request, it will promptly inform the requestor of the additional documents and provide them on an expedited basis.

COSTS OF PROVIDING RECORDS, WAIVER OF COSTS, AND AGREEMENTS REGARDING COSTS

Cost of Printed Copies and Mailing

The cost of providing photocopies or printed copies of electronic records is 15 cents per page. Alternatively, if the District determines and documents that the fees allowed under this procedure are clearly equal to, or more than, two dollars, the District may instead charge a flat fee of two dollars to provide the records. If the District charges a flat fee for the first installment, the District will not charge an additional flat fee or a per page fee for any subsequent installments. Payment may be made by cash, check, or money order payable to the District.

The District may also charge actual costs of mailing, including the cost of the shipping container or envelope.

The Public Records Officer or designee may require the payment of the remainder of the copying costs before providing all the records, or the payment of the costs of copying an installment before providing that installment.

If requested, the District will provide a summary of the applicable charges before any copies are made. The requestor will be allowed to revise the request in order to reduce the applicable charges.

Customized Service Charge

A customized service charge may be imposed if the District estimates that the request would require the use of information technology expertise to prepare data compilations, or to provide customized electronic access services when such compilations and customized access services are not used by the District for other District purposes. The customized service charge may reimburse the District up to the actual cost of providing the services in this paragraph.

The District will not assess a customized service charge unless it has notified the requestor of the customized service charge to be applied to the request, including an explanation of why the customized service charge applies, a description of the specific expertise, and a reasonable estimate cost of the charge. The notice will also provide the requestor the opportunity to amend his or her request in order to avoid or reduce the cost of a customized service charge.

Cost for Electronic Records

The cost for providing electronic records is as follows:

  1. Ten cents per page for public records scanned into an electronic format or for the use of District equipment to scan the records;
  2. Five cents per each four electronic files or attachment uploaded to email, cloud-based data storage service, or other means of electronic delivery;
  3. Ten cents per gigabyte for the transmission of public records in an electronic format or for the use of District equipment to send the records electronically; and
  4. The actual cost of any digital storage media or device provided by the District, the actual cost of any container or envelope used to mail the copies to the requestor, and the actual postage or delivery charge.

The District will take reasonable steps to provide the records in the most efficient manner available to the District in its normal operations;

Alternatively, if the District determines and documents that the fees allowed under this procedure are clearly equal to, or more, than two dollars, the District may instead charge a flat fee of two dollars to provide the records. If the District charges a flat fee for the first installment, the District will not charge an additional flat fee or a per page fee for any subsequent installments.

The Public Records Officer or designee may also require the payment of the remainder of the copying costs before providing all the records, or the payment of the costs of copying an installment before providing that installment.

If requested, the District will provide a summary of the applicable charges before charges are imposed under this procedure. The requestor will be allowed to revise the request in order to reduce the applicable charges.

The District will not impose copying charges for access to or downloading of records that the District routinely posts on its website prior to the receipt of a request, unless the requestor has specifically requested that the District provide copies of such records through other means.

Deposits

Before beginning to make the copies, the Public Records Officer or designee may require a deposit of up to ten percent of the estimated costs of copying all the records selected by the requestor, including the cost of a customized service charge according to the provision above.

Waiver

The Public Records Officer may waive any charge assessed for a request. On behalf of the District, the Public Records Officer may also enter into any contract, memorandum of understanding, or other agreement with a requestor that provides an alternative fee arrangement to the charges authorized in this Procedure, or in response to a voluminous or frequently occurring request.

INTERNAL REVIEW OF DENIALS OF PUBLIC RECORDS

Petition for Internal Administrative Review of Denial of Access

Any person who objects to the initial denial or partial denial of a records request may petition in writing (including email) to the Public Records Officer for a review of that decision. The petition shall include a copy of or reasonably identify the written statement by the Public Records Officer or designee denying the request.

Consideration of Petition for Review

The Public Records Officer shall immediately consider the petition and shall either affirm or reverse the denial within two business days following the receipt of the petition, or within such other time as the District and the requestor mutually agree to.

REPORTING COSTS OF PRODUCING PUBLIC RECORDS

The District will provide the information specified in RCW Chapter 40.14 to the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee as required by law.



4050—ENDORSEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

The board recognizes the importance of the home as a partner in the educational process. The staff of the district shall not endorse any commercial materials that might be used to supplement a student’s program.

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4060P‑PROCEDURE DISTRIBUTION OF MATERIALS

Individuals seeking to distribute information in schools will submit to the superintendent a statement of the recreational or educational value to students.

Dissemination of the information does not reflect the district’s endorsement or sponsorship of the activity. All materials distributed must contain the statement “The district does not sponsor or endorse this event/information and the district assumes no responsibility for it.”In consideration of the privilege to distribute materials, the __________ School District will be held harmless from any cause of action filed in any court or administrative tribunal arising out of the distribution of these materials, including costs, attorney’s fees and judgments or awards.”

The district or the school will not distribute materials that:

A. Are obscene, lewd, or vulgar;
B. Are libelous;
C. Contain language that is intimidating, demeaning, harassing or threatening on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin or ancestry, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, marital or veteran status, including, but not limited to, racial, sexual, or ethnic slurs;
D. Promote commercial enterprises;
E. Promote the violation of existing laws, regulation or ordinances, or official school policy, rules or regulations; or
F. Proselytize or disparage religious beliefs.

The Superintedent will review and determine whether the materials are approved for distribution to students. Any further review will be made by the superintendent/designee whose decision is final.

Adoption Date: 6/25/15
Raymond School District #116



4110—CITIZENS’ ADVISORY COMMITTEES AND TASK FORCES

The superintendent and/or board may appoint a citizens’ advisory committee or task force as necessary to gather public input and/or establish interaction with the community about selected issues. The committee shall study school matters and submit their findings and recommendations to the superintendent and/or board. This committee shall be formed by authorization of the board. Such authorization shall include a description of the responsibilities and reporting relationships and shall specify the duration of the committee’s existence.

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4110P—CITIZEN’S ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The following guidelines have been prepared to assist a citizens’ advisory committee or task force:

A. A specific charge or assignment shall be made to the committee.

B. The board shall appoint a committee member based upon the person’s interest and the board’s judgment of the individual’s potential contribution to the accomplishment of the committee’s task.

C. The committee shall be advisory only. The board does not and, under the law cannot, relinquish its decision-making responsibilities.

D. The committee shall make periodic progress reports to the board; such interim reports as well as the committee’s final findings and recommendations shall become matters of public record by virtue of their presentation to the board in a public board meeting.

E. Minority recommendations, as well as those of the majority, shall be welcomed by the board.

F. The duration of the committee shall be indicated when it is established. The board may authorize the committee to continue its work beyond the original termination date.

G. Staff consultants and other resource assistance shall be made available. The committee may elect to request advice or opinions from others as well, including representative citizens.

H. Committee meeting guidelines are as follows:

  1. The frequency of meetings, meeting times, meeting places and the nature of the meeting announcements shall normally be determined by the committee.
  2. The committee may invite public attendance if it feels such attendance shall facilitate the accomplishment of its goals.
  3. The committee shall develop meeting procedures to assist in the orderly pursuit of its task.

I. Expenses of the committee may be allowed if authorized in advance.

J. Appointment of the committee chair shall be the prerogative of the board.

K. By agreeing to serve on the committee, a person indicates his/her willingness to comply with the board’s guidelines for a citizens’ advisory committee/task force and with specific guidelines and procedures developed for the committee.



4120—SCHOOL-SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS

The board encourages the formation of a parent-teacher-student association or similar organization at each school building for the purpose of providing an opportunity through which parents, teachers and students may unite their efforts and interests to enhance the school program. In schools where no such organization exists, another parent group can be recognized by the school principal as the official body through which parents, staff and students may unite their efforts for similar purposes.

Booster clubs and/or special interest organizations may be formed to support and strengthen specific activities conducted within the school or district. All such groups must receive the approval of the school principal or superintendent in order to be recognized as a booster organization. Staff participation, cooperation and support are encouraged in such recognized organizations.

Legal References:
RCW 9.46.0321 Bingo, raffles, amusement games-No license required, when.

Management Resources:
2017 – July Issue

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116
Technical Fix 10/26/17



4120P—SCHOOL-SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS

The following guidelines are provided for use by booster and/or PTSA/PTSO groups which are involved in fundraising activities:

  1. Local booster clubs and PTSAs/PTSOs should be incorporated as nonprofit organizations.
  2. In order to receive nonprofit status, the group must file articles of incorporation and bylaws with the Secretary of State. A nonprofit organization must adhere to state laws RCW 24.03.
  3. The board of directors of the school district has established a fee schedule that governs the use of facilities by a school-support organization.
  4. The nonprofit organization must operate without cost to the district.
  5. The Washington State Gambling Commission, the Department of Licensing and the Internal Revenue Service have licensing regulations covering fundraising activities by nonprofit corporations.
    1. A nonprofit corporation may conduct sales or benefit affairs which include athletic or sports events, bazaars, benefits, campaigns, circuses, contests, dances, drives, entertainments, exhibitions, expositions, parties, performances, picnics, sales, social gatherings, theaters, and variety shows;
    2. A nonprofit corporation may operate bingo activities, raffles, and amusement games under requirements regulated by the Washington State Gambling Commission (RCW 9.46); and
    3. A charitable organization involved in sales and benefits grossing over $5,000 must obtain IRS recognition.
  6. When bingo, raffles, and amusement games are conducted, the State Gambling Act controls the endeavor. Certain gambling activities may be conducted by nonprofit organizations without a gambling permit under certain conditions. To operate without a gambling permit, a nonprofit must be recognized by the IRS and/or contributions to the group must be considered tax deductible. In addition, the nonprofit must have been organized and operating for at least 12 months before operating the gambling activity, and be able to prove that it has made significant progress towards accomplishing its stated purposes during the 12 consecutive months before operating the gambling activity. 

A nonprofit organization may hold an unlimited number of members-only raffles if the combined gross revenue (money taken in) from these raffles does not exceed $5,000 during a calendar year. In addition to members-only raffles, a nonprofit may offer two unlicensed raffle, bingo, or amusement game events to the public each year and must notify its local police agency at least five days before conducting the event. RCW 9.46.0321



4129—FAMILY INVOLVEMENT

It is the policy of the Raymond School District board of directors to encourage and support family involvement in education at home, in our schools and communities, and in school governance. The board recognizes the diversity of family structures, circumstances, and cultural backgrounds and respects families as important decision makers for their children’s education. The Board is committed to the creation and implementation of culturally inclusive and effective school-family partnerships throughout the school district and in each school, and believes these partnerships to be critical to the success of every student. The district’s family involvement efforts will be comprehensive and coordinated.

The board recognizes that family involvement in education has a positive effect on student achievement and is an important strategy in reducing achievement gaps. The intent of this policy is to create and maintain a district-wide climate conducive to the involvement of families and to develop and sustain partnerships that support student learning and positive child and youth development in all schools.

The board is committed to professional development opportunities for staff and leadership to enhance understanding of effective family involvement strategies. The board also recognizes the importance of administrative leadership in setting expectations and creating a climate conducive to school-family partnerships.

In support of the implementation of this policy, a copy will be distributed to all schools, school staff, families, teachers and community members. Further, the district will provide support and guidance, to parents and teachers as they plan and implement effective family involvement efforts.

The Raymond School District board of directors support the development, implementation and regular evaluation of family involvement efforts that includes parents and family members at all grade levels in a variety of roles. The district will use the results of the evaluation to enhance school-family partnerships within the district.

The superintendent will develop procedures to implement this policy.

Adoption Date: 11/25/08
Raymond School District #116



4129P—FAMILY INVOLVEMENT PROCEDURE

Definitions:

The term “family” is used to denote parents, extended family, guardians, or other persons with whom the student lives. “Parent” or “family” may also include community members or other concerned adults involved in the student’s life, pursuant to state and federal laws surrounding confidentiality.

“Family Involvement” refers to school/family partnerships. It is the collaborative interaction between educators and families in activities that promote student learning and positive child and youth development at home, in school, and in the community, including but not limited to regular, two- way and meaningful communication between parents and school personnel; outreach to families; parent education; volunteering; school decision making; and advocacy.

Implementation:

The superintendent will identify a district administrator to supervise the implementation of this policy and procedure, and each school in the district will develop a family involvement plan aligned with their academic goals and/or school improvement plan and, if applicable, Title 1 services. Each plan will be tailored to the realities of school families, be culturally relevant to the school population and delineate strategies to greater family participation in education (particularly families who are economically disadvantaged, have disabilities, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background).

The district’s family involvement efforts will have six overarching goals. They will include, but not be limited to, the following research-based National Standards for Parent/Family Involvement in schools:

A. Communicating: Effective two-way communication between all parents and schools regarding district policies and procedures, local school operating procedures, and an individual child’s progress.

B. Parenting: Information and programs for parents on how to establish a home environment to support learning and appropriate behavior.

C. Student Learning: Information and programs for parents about how they can assist their own children to learn and meet the student’s short-term and long-term educational goals.

D. Volunteering: Activities to encourage a variety of parental volunteer opportunities in schools both in the classroom and in other areas of the school including attendance at local school programs and events.

E. School Decision-Making and Advocacy: Assistance to develop parental involvement in educational advocacy, including school district task forces and site based advisory committees.

F. Collaborating with Community: Identification and utilization of community resources to strengthen school and family partnerships and student learning.

In order to achieve these goals the board, district and school staff will comply with the roles and responsibilities that are outlined below.

Roles and Responsibilities

The Board will:

  • Perform regular evaluations of family involvement efforts at each school and in the district;
  • Implement strategies to involve families in the educational process, including information about opportunities for volunteering and encouraging participation in various school and district activities;
  • Keep families informed of the objectives of district educational programs as well as of their child’s participation and progress with these programs. (This could be accomplished through newsletters, the district website, translated materials, school and district reader boards, etc.)
  • Enable families to participate in district level decision making opportunities. For example, family members may provide input into district policies or district level committees.

The District Administrators and Staff will:

  • Provide professional development opportunities for teachers and staff to enhance their understanding of effective family involvement strategies.
  • Provide activities that will educate families regarding the intellectual and developmental needs of their children. These activities may rely on cooperation between the districts and other agencies or school/community groups.
  • Provide access to educational resources for parents and families to support the education of their children. (For example, a family training center or a family academy for classes and parenting books, magazines and home teaching materials.)
  • Allocate staff, time and resources to ensure effective implementation of this policy and procedure.
  • Work with staff and families to identify resources needed to implement planned family involvement activities and programs.
  • Provide time for teachers to share and replicate successful classroom strategies that promote and increase school-family partnerships.
  • Provide training opportunities for school staff to increase their skills in working effectively with all families and to enable them to provide family workshops that link family involvement to student learning.
  • Conduct both formal, such as Title 1 parent meetings, and informal, such as coffee chats and breakfast with the principal meetings, to ensure ongoing two way communications with families.
  • Provide a system where teachers, students, and families can resolve problems that arise in ways that promote the best relationships possible allowing them to solve problems first before resorting to the inclusion of principals and other administrators.
  • Provide assistance for families to understand topics such as the state academic content standards, and state and local academic assessments, and how to monitor a child’s progress and work with educators to improve the achievement of their children. (For example, by publishing information in multiple languages and regularly communicating with families regarding academic requirements);
  • Work with staff and families to brainstorm possible activities and actions that are consistent with the family involvement policy and, when appropriate incorporate these into schools’ annual goals and/or the school improvement plan.
  • Recognize staff, families and community members who promote school-wide family partnerships.
  • Monitor and evaluate with district assistance the effectiveness of family partnership efforts in the district.

School Staff will:

  • Allocate staff, time and resources to implement this policy at the school level.
  • Help families feel welcome by demonstrating excellent customer service and basic courtesy.
  • Treat all families and community members with respect; be sensitive to cultural differences and life circumstances among families.
  • Be as flexible as possible when scheduling appointments and school events with families.
  • Communicate early and positively with families and continue these positive contacts throughout the year, including home visits during the year, if feasible.
  • Consider an annual student led conference and/or an annual parents meeting.
  • Invite parents and family members to observe and assist in classrooms.
  • Offer families opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children.
  • Share class/school discipline and homework policies with families and follow through in a timely manner if problems arise.
  • Involve families in decision-making committees and other site-based councils.

Evaluation

The content and effectiveness of this policy and procedure, and the individual school plans will be evaluated by the Superintendent or his/her appointee annually with regard to the quality and effectiveness of the strategies presented in the plan. The findings of the evaluation will be used to design strategies for more effective family involvement, and if necessary to revise this policy and procedure.

Adoption Date: 11/25/08
Raymond School District #116



4130—TITLE I PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT

A. The Board recognizes that parent involvement contributes to the achievement of academic standards by students participating in district programs. The Board views the education of students as a cooperative effort among school, parents and community. The Board expects that its schools will carry out programs, activities and procedures in accordance with the statutory definition of parental involvement. Parental involvement means the participation of parents in regular, two-way, and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school activities, including ensuring that parents:

A. Play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning;

B. Are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at school; and

C. Are full partners in their child’s education and are included, as appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child.

B. The board of directors adopts as part of this policy the following guidance for parent involvement. The District shall:

A. Put into operation programs, activities and procedures for the involvement of parents in all of its Title I schools consistent with federal laws including the development and evaluation of policy. Those programs, activities and procedures will be planned and operated with meaningful consultation with parents of participating children;

B. Provide the coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist participating schools in the planning and implementing of effective parent involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and school performance.

C. Build the schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong parental involvement;

D. Coordinate and integrate Title I parental involvement strategies with parent involvement strategies under other programs, such as preschool, alternative school and HomeLink;

E. Conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this policy in improving the academic quality of the schools served with Title I funds including: identifying barriers to greater participation of parents in Title I-related activities, with particular attention to participation of parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities and parents of migratory children; and

F. Involve the parents of children served in Title I, Part A schools in decisions about how the Title I, Part A funds reserved for parental involvement are spent.

Legal References:
PL 107-110, Section 1118(a)

Management Resources:
Policy News, October 2008 Family Involvement Policy
Policy News, June 2005 Title 1 Parental Involvement Policy
Policy News, August 2003 No Child Left Behind Update

Adoption Date: 11/25/08
Raymond School District #116



4130P—TITLE I PARENT INVOLVEMENT

I. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the district’s Title I Parent Involvement policy, plan and programs comply with the requirements of federal law.

A. The district will take the following actions to involve parents in the joint development of its district wide parental involvement plan:

  1. An annual meeting of parents of participating title 1 students shall be held to explain the goals and purposes of the Title 1 program. The principal of any Title I school is responsible to ensure that all parents are invited to such a meeting, to be held within the first two months of school.
  2. Parents will be given the opportunity to participate in the development, operation and evaluation of the program. These opportunities will be explained at the annual meeting and in the Title I compact.
  3. Parents will be encouraged to participate in planning activities, to offer suggestions, and to ask questions regarding policies and programs. Such opportunities will be given at the annual meeting. An open door policy will be in effect and electronic resources made available to keep parents informed of such opportunities.

B. The district will take the following actions to involve parents in the process of school review and improvement:

  1. Parents will be given the opportunity to review the school improvement plan. Each Title I school will make such a plan available to any parent who requests it. Such notice will also appear in the annual
  2. Parents will be encouraged to participate in the building self-review. The principal will invite parents to take part annually.

C. The district will provide the following coordination, technical assistance, and other support to assist Title I, Part A schools in planning and implementing effective parental involvement activities:

  1. Identify barriers to greater participation by parents in parental involvement activities;
  2. Use findings of the evaluation to design strategies for more effective parental involvement; and
  3. Revise, when necessary, the district and school parent involvement policies.

D. The district will coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies with similar strategies under the following other programs, such as:

  1. Preschool;
  2. HomeLink;
  3. Learning Assistance Program;
  4. Special Education

E. The district shall facilitate removing barriers to parental involvement by activities such as:

  1. Conducting joint parent meetings with other programs;
  2. Holding meetings at various times of the day and evening;
  3. Arranging for in home conferences;
  4. Title 1 funds may be used to facilitate parent attendance at meetings by payment of transportation and childcare costs.

F. The district will conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parental involvement policy.

G. The district will build the schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong parental involvement through the following:

  1. The school district will, with the assistance of its Title I, Part A schools, provide information to parents of children served by the school district or school, as appropriate, in understanding topics such as the following:

a. The State’s essential academic learning requirements,
b. The State and local academic assessments including alternate assessments,
c. How to monitor their child’s progress, and
d. How to work with educators.
e. Electronic access to student progress and academic needs

2. The school district will, with the assistance of its schools, provide materials and training to help parents work with their children to improve their children’s academic achievement, by:

a. Giving guidance as to how parents can assist at home in the education of their child;
b. Holding parent meetings at various times of the day and evening to provide parents:

Opportunities to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children.
Opportunities to submit parent comments about the program to the district.
Opportunities to meet with the classroom and Title 1, Part A teachers to discuss their children’s progress.

H. The district will provide:

  1. An explanation of the reasons supporting their child’s selection for the program;
  2. A description and explanation of the school’s curriculum;
  3. Information in the academic assessment used to measure student progress;
  4. Information on the proficiency levels students are expected to meet; and
  5. Electronic notification of student progress and academic needs

I. The school district will take the following actions to ensure that information related to the school and parent- programs, meetings, and other activities, is sent to the parents of participating children in an understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon request, and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand:

  1. Distribute the Title 1 Family Involvement policy on a annual basis via student flyer); and
  2. To the extent needed and practicable, distribute the Title 1 Family Involvement policy in multiple languages or formats.

II. School-Based Parent Involvement Policy

A. In addition to the district-wide policy on family involvement, each school offering Title I, Part A services will have a separate school building parent involvement policy. The building-level Title I , Part A parent involvement policy will meet the following requirements: a) Each building in the district receiving Title 1, Part A funds shall jointly develop with and distribute to parents of students served in the program a written building-level policy, agreed upon by parents of Title I served students; b) The policy will outline how  parents, school staff and students share responsibility for student achievement in meeting academic standards; c) Parents will be notified of the policy in an understandable and uniform format; d) To the extent practicable, the policy will be provided in a language the parents can understand; and e) The policy will be evaluated with parents annually.

Adoption Date: 11/25/08
Raymond School District #116



4200—SAFE AND ORDERLY LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Contacts With Staff

The learning environment and the staff’s time for students shall be free from interruption. Except in emergencies, staff shall not be interrupted in their work. Brief messages shall be recorded so as to permit the staff member to return the call when free.

Certificated staff shall be available for consultation with students and patrons in accordance with Policy 5231. Students and patrons are urged to make appointments with staff to assure an uninterrupted conference.

No one shall solicit funds or conduct private business with staff on school time and premises.

Visitors

The board welcomes and encourages visits to school by parents/guardians, other adult residents of the community and interested educators. The superintendent shall establish guidelines governing school visits to insure orderly operation of the educational process and the safety of students and staff.

Disruption Of School Operations

The superintendent or staff member in charge will direct a person to leave immediately if any person is:

A. Under the influence of controlled substances, including marijuana (cannabis) or alcohol; or

B. Is disrupting or obstructing any school program, activity, or meeting; or

C. Threatens to do so or is committing, threatening to imminently commit; or

D. Inciting another to imminently commit any act which would disturb or interfere with or obstruct any lawful task, function, process or procedure (of any student, official, classified or certificated staff member or invitee) of the school district.

If such a person refuses to leave, the superintendent or staff member will immediately call for the assistance of a law enforcement officer.

Cross References:
Board Policy 3124 Removal/Release of Student During School Hours
Board Policy 3510 Associated Student Bodies

Legal References:
RCW 28A.635.020 Wilfully disobeying school administrative personnel or refusing to leave public property, violations, when — Penalty
RCW 28A.635.030 Disturbing school, school activities, or meetings
RCW 28A.635.090 Interfering by force or violence Penalty
RCW 28A.635.100 Intimidating any administrator, teacher, classified employee, or student by threat of force or violence unlawful — Penalty
RCW 28A.605.020 Parents’ access to classroom or school sponsored activities
20 U.S.C. § 9528 No Child Left Behind Act, Military Recruiter Provision
Recruiter Provision

Management Resources:
Policy & Legal News, February 2013 Policy Revisions

Adoption Date: 1/25/07
Raymond School District #116
Technical Fix: 03/06/13



4200P—VISITORS

The following guidelines are established to permit visitors to observe the educational program with minimal disruption:

A. All visitors must register at the office upon their arrival at school.

B. Visitors whose purpose is to influence or solicit students shall not be permitted on the school grounds unless the visit furthers the educational program of the district. Military recruiter will be provided the same opportunities to meet with students as higher education and employer representatives.

C. If the visitor wishes to observe a classroom, the time shall be arranged after the principal has conferred with the teacher.

D. If the purpose of the classroom visitation is to observe learning and teaching activities, the visitor may be asked to confer with the teacher before or after the observation to enhance understanding of the activities.

E. The principal may withhold approval if particular events such as testing would be adversely affected by a visit. Similarly, if a visitor’s presence becomes disruptive, the principal may withdraw approval. In either case, the principal shall give reasons for the action.

F. If a dispute arises regarding limitations upon or withholding of approval for visits:

1. The visitor shall first discuss the matter with the principal;
2. If it is not satisfactorily resolved, the visitor may request a meeting with the superintendent. The latter shall promptly meet with the visitor, investigate the dispute and render a written decision, which shall be final, subject only to the citizen’s right to raise an issue at a regular session of the board.

Disruption at School Activities

The following guidelines are suggested as basic security measures to prevent/reduce disruptive activities in the school:

A. All visitors are required to check into the office upon entering a school building. All entrances must be posted;

B. Staff members are responsible for monitoring hallways and playgrounds. Unfamiliar persons are to be directed to the office.

C. A visitor’s badge with the current date should be worn conspicuously;

D. Written guidelines pertaining to rights of non-custodial parents should be readily accessible to direct staff about what to do if a non-custodial parent shows up demanding to:

1. meet with the teacher of his/her child;
2. visit with his/her child; or
3. remove his/her child from the school premises.

E. If a visitor is under the influence of alcohol or drugs, is committing a disruptive act or invites another person to do so, the staff member shall exercise the right to order the visitor off school premises. If the visitor fails to comply, the staff member shall contact the school office which may, in turn, report the disturbance to a law enforcement officer.

Adoption Date: 02/25/03
Raymond School District #116



 4210‑Regulation of Dangerous Weapons on School Premises

It is a violation of district policy and state law for any person to carry a firearm or dangerous weapon on school premises, school-provided transportation or areas of other facilities being used exclusively for school activities unless specifically authorized by state law. Carrying a dangerous weapon onto school premises, school-provided transportation, or areas of other facilities being used exclusively for school activities in violation of RCW 9.41.280 is a criminal offense.

The superintendent is directed to see that all school facilities post “Gun-Free Zone” signs, and that all violations of this policy and RCW 9.41.280 are reported annually to the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Dangerous Weapons

The term “dangerous weapons” under state law includes:

  • Any firearm;
  • Any device commonly known as “nun-chu-ka sticks,” consisting of two or more length of wood, metal, plastic, or similar substance connected with wire, rope, or other means;
  • Any device, commonly known as “throwing stars,” which are multi-pointed, metal objects designed to embed upon impact from any aspect;
  • Any air gun, including any air pistol or air rifle, designed to propel a BB, pellet, or other projectile by the discharge of compressed air, carbon dioxide, or other gas;
  • Any portable device manufactured to function as a weapon and which is commonly known as a stun gun, including a projectile stun gun which projects wired probes that are attached to the device that emit an electrical charge designed to administer to a person or an animal an electric shock, charge, or impulse;
  • Any device, object, or instrument which is used or intended to be used as a weapon with the intent to injure a person by an electric shock, charge, or impulse;
  • The following instruments:
    • Any dirk or dagger;
    • Any knife with a blade longer than three inches;
    • Any knife with a blade which is automatically released by a spring mechanism or other mechanical device;
    • Any knife having a blade which opens, or falls or is ejected into position by the force of gravity, or by outward, downward, or centrifugal thrust or movement; and
    • Any razor with an unguarded blade;
  • Any slung shot, sandbag, or sandclub;
  • Metal knuckles;
  • A sling shot;
  • Any metal pipe or bar used or intended to be used as a club;
  • Any explosive;
  • Any weapon containing poisonous or injurious gas;
  • Any implement or instrument which has the capacity to inflict death and from the manner in which it is used, is likely to produce or may easily and readily produce death.

In addition, the District considers the following weapons in violation of this policy:

  • Any knife or razor not listed above, except for instruments authorized or provided for specific school activities;
  • Any object other than those listed above which is used in a manner to intimidate, threaten, or injure another person and is capable of easily and readily producing such injury.

Reporting Dangerous Weapons

An appropriate school authority will promptly notify the student’s parents or guardians and the appropriate law enforcement agency of known or suspected violations of this policy. Students who violate this policy will be subject to discipline. Students who have possessed a firearm on any school premises, school-provided transportation, or school-sponsored activities at any facility shall be expelled for not less than one year pursuant to RCW 28A.600.420. The superintendent may modify the one-year expulsion for a firearm on a case-by-case basis.

The district may also suspend or expel a student for up to one year if the student acts with malice (as defined under RCW 9A.04.110) and displays a device that appears to be a firearm.

No expulsion under RCW 28A.600.420 prevents the district from continuing to provide educational services in an alternative educational setting in compliance with RCW 28A.600.015. Any alternative setting should be comparable, equitable, and appropriate to the regular education services a student would have received without the exclusionary discipline. Example alternative settings include one-on-one tutoring and online learning.

Exceptions to State Law and this Policy

The following persons may carry firearms into school buildings, as necessary, although students engaged in these activities are restricted to the possession of rifles on school premises:

A. Persons engaged in military, law enforcement, or school district security activities;
B. Persons involved in a school authorized convention, showing, demonstration, lecture or firearm safety course;
C. Persons competing in school authorized firearm or air gun competitions; and
D. Any federal, state or local law enforcement officer.

The following persons over eighteen years of age and not enrolled as students may have firearms in their possession on school property outside of school buildings:

A. Persons with concealed weapons permits issued pursuant to RCW 9.41.070 who are picking up or dropping off students; and
B. Persons conducting legitimate business at the school and in lawful possession of a firearm or dangerous weapon if the weapon is secured within an attended vehicle, is unloaded and secured in a vehicle, or is concealed from view in a locked, unattended vehicle.

Persons may bring dangerous weapons, other than firearms, onto school premises if the weapons are lawfully within the person’s possession and are to be used in a school-authorized martial arts class.

Personal Protection Spray

Persons over eighteen years of age, and persons between fourteen and eighteen years of age with written parental or guardian permission, may possess personal protection spray devices on school property. No one under eighteen years of age may deliver such devices. No one eighteen years or older may deliver a spray device to anyone under fourteen, or to anyone between fourteen and eighteen who does not have parental permission.

Personal protection spray devices may not be used other than in self-defense as defined by state law. Possession, transmission or use of personal protection spray devices under any other circumstances is a violation of district policy.

Cross References:
3240 – Student Conduct Expectations and Reasonable Sanctions
3241 – Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action
4260 – Use of School Facilities

Legal References:
RCW 9A.16.020 Use of force – when lawful
RCW 9.41.250 Dangerous weapons—Penalty
RCW 9.41.280 Dangerous weapons on facilities—Penalty — Exceptions
RCW 9.91.160 Personal protection spray devices
RCW 9.94A.225 Deadly weapon special verdict–definition
RCW 28A.600.420 Firearms on school premises, transportation, or facilities — Penalty — Exemptions

Management Resources:
2016 – July Issue
Policy News, August 2006 Weapons on School Premises
Policy News, August 1998 State Encourages Modification of Weapons Policy
Policy News, October 1997 Legislature also addresses “look-alike” firearms

Adoption Date: 09/22/2016
Raymond School District #116



 4215‑Use of Tobacco, Nicotine Products and Delivery Devices

The board of directors recognizes that to protect students from exposure to the addictive substance of nicotine, employees and officers of the school district, and all members of the community, have an obligation as role models to refrain from use of tobacco products and delivery devices on school property at all times. Tobacco products and delivery devices include, but are not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, snuff, smoking tobacco, smokeless tobacco, nicotine, electronic smoking/vapor devices and vapor products, non-prescribed inhalers, nicotine delivery devices or chemicals that are not FDA-approved to help people quit using tobacco, devices that produce the same flavor or physical effect of nicotine substances and any other smoking equipment, device, material or innovation.

Any use of such products and delivery devices by staff, students, visitors and community members will be prohibited on all school district property, including all district buildings, grounds and district-owned vehicles, and within five hundred feet of schools. Possession by or distribution of tobacco products to minors is prohibited.

The use of Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved nicotine replacement therapy in the form of a nicotine patch, gum or lozenge is permitted. However, students and employees must follow applicable policies regarding use of medication at school.

Notices advising students, district employees and community members of this policy will be posted in appropriate locations in all district buildings and at other district facilities as determined by the superintendent and will be included in the employee and student handbooks. Employees and students are subject to discipline for violations of this policy, and school district employees are responsible for the enforcement of the policy.

Cross References:
3200 – Rights and Responsibilities
3241 – Classroom Management, Discipline and Corrective Action
3416 – Medication at School
5201 – Drug-Free Schools, Community and Workplace
5280 – Separation from Employment

Legal References:
RCW 28A.210.260 Public and private schools — Administration of medication — Conditions.
RCW 28A.210.270 Public and private schools — Administration of medication — Immunity from liability — Discontinuance, procedure.
RCW 28A.210.310 Prohibition on use of tobacco products on school property
Chapter 70.155, RCW Tobacco – Access to Minors

Management Resources:
2016 – July Issue
2014 – February Issue
2010 – December Issue
2010 – October Issue

Adoption Date: 10/27/2016
Raymond School District #116



4217‑EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

In compliance with federal and state law, all District-sponsored programs, activities, meetings, and services will be accessible to individuals with disabilities, including persons with hearing, vision, and/or speech disabilities. When communicating in this context with students, families, applicants, participants, members of the public, and their companions with disabilities, the District will take appropriate steps to ensure that any communications are as effective as communications with persons who have no disabilities. Such steps will include furnishing in a timely manner appropriate auxiliary aids and services when necessary to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, programs, activities, meetings, or services conducted or sponsored by the District. The information contained within the District’s website is a service will be accessible to all individuals with disabilities.

When an IDEA-eligible or a Section 504-eligible student’s disability impacts his/her hearing, vision or speech, the school will apply both a FAPE (free and appropriate public education) analysis and the effective communication requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Title II) in determining how to meet the student’s communication needs and how to formulate the student’s individual education program (IEP).

For families, applicants, participants, members of the public, and their companions, the District’s website will provide information on how to request auxiliary aids and services, ask related questions, or raise concerns. When necessary and upon request, such information will also be provided in an accessible format for the requestor at no cost. A form for requesting auxiliary aids and services will be available on the District website, at the District office and attached as an appendix to the implementing procedure for this policy. When determining an appropriate auxiliary aid or service, the District or school will give primary consideration to the auxiliary aid or service specifically requested by the person with a disability.

For purposes of this policy, “auxiliary aids and services” include a wide range of services, devices, technologies, and methods for providing effective communication, and may include:

1. Effective methods of making aurally-delivered information available to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, such as:

  • qualified interpreters (on-site or through video remote interpreting services)
  • note-takers
  • real-time computer-aided transcription services (“CART”)
  • written materials
  • the exchange of written notes
  • telephone handset amplifiers
  • assistive listening devices
  • assistive listening systems
  • telephones compatible with hearing aids
  • closed caption decoders
  • open and closed captioning, including real-time captioning
  • voice, text, and video-based telecommunications products and systems, including text telephones (TTYs), videophones, and captioned telephones, or equally effective telecommunications devices
  • videotext displays
  • accessible electronic and information technology

2. Effective methods of making visually-delivered information available to individuals with visual impairments, such as:

  • qualified readers
  • taped texts
  • audio recordings
  • Brailed materials and displays
  • screen reader software
  • magnification software
  • optical readers
  • secondary auditory programs (SAP)
  • large print materials
  • accessible electronic and information technology

3. Effective methods of enabling a person with a speech disability to communicate with the school or District personnel, such as:

  • a word or letter board
  • writing materials
  • spelling to communicate
  • a qualified sign-language interpreter
  • taped texts
  • a computer
  • a portable device that writes and/or produces speech
  • telecommunication devices

4. Acquisition or modification of equipment or devices; and

5. Other similar services and actions.

Auxiliary aids and services will be provided for any school-initiated program, activity, meeting, or service, which may include:

  • Parent/teacher conferences
  • ESE/IEP/504 meetings
  • Conferences or hearings involving student corrective action
  • Planning meetings
  • Interviews for District employment
  • Staff Meetings
  • Interactive meetings regarding accommodations
  • Graduation ceremonies
  • Field Trips
  • School Performances or Sporting Events
  • Board Meetings
  • Website information, including on-line information regarding curriculum, policies, and Board materials and agendas.
  • Reports of student grades and academic progress
  • Parental alerts regarding school closures or events

The Superintendent is granted the authority to develop procedures in order to implement this policy.

Cross References:
2161 – Special Education and Related Services for Eligible Students
2162 – Education of Students with Disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
3210 – Nondiscrimination

Legal References:
Chapter 28A.642 RCW Discrimination prohibition
Chapter 49.60 RCW Discrimination — Human rights commission
WAC 392-400-215 Student rights
42 U.S.C. §§ 12131-12134 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) (Title II)
28 C.F.R. part 35 – Nondiscrimination on the basis of disability in state and local government services
29 U.S.C. § 794 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
34 C.F.R. part 104 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
20 U.S.C. §§ 1400-1419 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B
34 C.F.R part 300 – Assistance to states for the education of children with disabilities

Management Resources:
2016 – March Issue

Adoption Date: 5/26/16
Raymond School District #116



4217F‑EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

RAYMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION REQUEST FORM*

Please note: The district needs as much advanced notice as possible to ensure that reasonable accommodations are met. Reasonable efforts will be made to accommodate requests made less than 48 hours in advance of a scheduled program, activity or event. If aids or services are needed for a meeting of the Board of Directors, please contact the office of the Superintendent directly at 360-942-3415, option 4.

Date of request: ____________

Request Type: (Please check all that apply)

♦ Assistive Listening Aid or Service
♦ Assistive Vision Aid or Service
♦ Assistive Speech Aid or Service
♦ Other___________________________

Contact Persons:

Individual making request:
Name
Email, Phone or Website (preferred communication)

Building manager (Principal) where event will take place:
Name
Email, Phone or Website (preferred communication)

Event Contact Person:
Name
Email, Phone or Website (preferred communication)

Event Details: Please attach any relevant supporting information (i.e., event flyer or brochure).

Event Name:

Event Date:

Start and End Time:

Event Description (i.e., lecture, seminar, meeting, sports event):

Location (i.e., building, facility, off-campus school-sponsored activity):

Other relevant details:



 4217P‑PROCEDURE EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

The District is committed to ensuring that all District-sponsored programs, activities, meetings, and services will be accessible to individuals with disabilities, including persons who have impaired hearing, vision or speech. The following procedure is intended to assist the District in taking appropriate steps to ensure that, related to such programs, activities, meetings, or services, any communication with students, families, applicants, participants, members of the public, and their companions with disabilities are as effective as communications with persons who have no disabilities. There is no fee or charge for the District to provide appropriate auxiliary aids or services.

Requesting Communication Aids or Services for a Program, Activity, or Event

Individuals who may need an auxiliary aid or service to participate in and enjoy the benefits of a program, activity, meeting, or event should contact the school or District office as soon as possible and no later than forty-eight (48) hours before a scheduled program or activity so that the District can make necessary arrangements. The District will make reasonable efforts to accommodate any requests made less than forty-eight (48) hours in advance of a program, activity, meeting, or event. For auxiliary aids or services specifically during a meeting of the Board of Directors, the request should be made directly to the office of the Superintendent.

The District’s website provides information on how to request auxiliary aids and services, ask related questions, or raise concerns. The following is the site for this information: [http//: www… ]

If a person with a disability cannot access this format, this information will also be provided in an accessible format when necessary and upon request.

A form for requesting auxiliary aids and services is on the District website. While it is not required that this form be used to make such a request, this written form will minimize miscommunication and help the District understand the specific auxiliary aids or services being requested. District staff will also assist a requestor in filling out this form, when necessary. A copy of the form is attached to this procedure as an appendix.

Determining an Appropriate Auxiliary Aid or Service

When the District provides an auxiliary aid or service necessary to ensure effective communication, the aid or service must be provided in an accessible format, in a timely manner, and in such a way as to protect the privacy and independence of any person with a disability. Determining an appropriate auxiliary aid or service must be individualized and made on a case-by-case basis, considering the communication used by the person with a disability; the nature, length and complexity of the communication involved; the content and the context in which the communication is taking place; the number of people involved in the communication; and the expected or actual length of time of the interaction(s). During this process, the District or school will give primary consideration to the auxiliary aid or service specifically requested by the person with a disability. “Primary consideration” means that the District will provide an opportunity for the person with the disability (or an appropriate family member) to request the aid or service that he or she thinks is needed to provide effective communication.

The District or school will honor the choice of the person with a disability unless:

1. the District or school can prove that an alternative auxiliary aid or service provides communication that is equally as effective as communication provided to a student without a disability; or
2. the District determines that such aid or service would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of the service, program, or activity, or would result in an undue financial and administrative burden to the District.

If the District refuses to provide a particular auxiliary aid or service for the reasons stated in number (2.) above, such determination must be made by the Superintendent or the Superintendent’s designee who has the authority to make budgetary and spending decisions, after considering all resources available for use by the District in the funding and operation of the service, program, or activity. This determination must be issued in writing with the reasons for concluding that a requested auxiliary aid or service would cause such alteration or burden. Nevertheless, the District must take other steps that would not result in such an alteration or burden, but would still ensure that, to the maximum extent possible, the individual with a hearing, vision, or speech disability can participate in and receive the benefits or services provided by the District’s program or activity.

If the District provides an auxiliary aid or service that is different than what is requested by the individual with a disability, the District will make a reasonable effort to provide notice to the requester in advance of the program, activity, meeting, or activity.

The District recognizes that communication and circumstances can change or evolve over time. If the communication with the person with a disability takes place over an extended period of time, the District or school should reassess the effectiveness of communications and seek regular feedback from the person with a disability.

Timely Manner

The District will determine an appropriate auxiliary aid or service as soon as possible following a request by a person with a disability, and will likewise provide the auxiliary aid or service as soon as practicable. The District or school personnel working with the person with a disability (or an appropriate family member) will keep that person informed of when the auxiliary aid or service will be provided.

Interpreters

For purposes of this policy, a “qualified interpreter” means an interpreter who, via a video remote interpreting (VRI) service or an on-site appearance, is able to interpret effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively and expressively, using any necessary specialized vocabulary. Qualified interpreters include sign language interpreters, oral transliterators, and cured-language transliterators. Interpreters certified to provide interpretation in court proceedings or during the delivery of health services are presumptively qualified to provide such services.

Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act expressly prohibits the school or District from requiring an individual with a disability to bring another person to interpret for him or her. The District is prohibited from relying upon a person who accompanies a child or adult with a hearing, vision, or speech disability to interpret or facilitate communication except under two circumstances:

  1. In an emergency involving an imminent threat to the safety or welfare of an individual or the public where there is no interpreter available, the school or the District may ask either a minor child or an adult to interpret or facilitate communication. In no other circumstances will the school or the District rely on a minor child to interpret or facilitate communication with a person with a disability.
  2. Where the individual with the hearing, vision, or speech disability specifically makes the request, an accompanying adult may interpret or facilitate communication if the accompanying adult agrees to provide the assistance and the school’s reliance on the accompanying adult is appropriate under the circumstances.

Complaints and Compliance

The District has an ADA Coordinator who monitor’s the District’s obligations and compliance with Title II, and who is charged with investigating complaints of disability discrimination. Informal or formal complaints of disability discrimination should be made pursuant to the processes contained in Procedure 3210P (Nondiscrimination). Questions and concerns relating to communication with persons with hearing, vision, and/or speech disabilities may be directed to:

Dr. Stephen Holland
ADA Coordinator for Title II
1016 Commercial Street
Raymond, WA 98577
(360) 942-3415
sholland@raymondk12.org

Adoption Date: 5/26/16
Raymond School District #116



 4218‑Language Access Plan

The Board of Directors is committed to improving meaningful, two-way communication and promoting access to District programs, services and activities for students and parents with limited English proficiency (LEP) free of charge. To that end, the Board of Directors requires the District to implement and maintain a language access plan tailored to the District’s current LEP parent population.

At a minimum, the District’s language access plan will incorporate the procedures that accompany this policy and address:

Parent Identification

The District will accurately and in a timely manner identify LEP parents and provide them information in a language they can understand regarding the language service resources available within the District.

Oral Interpretation

The District will take reasonable steps to provide LEP parents competent oral interpretation of materials or information about any program, service, and activity provided to non-LEP parents and to facilitate any interaction with district staff significant to the student’s education. The District will provide such services upon request of the LEP parent(s) and/or when it may be reasonably anticipated by District staff that such services will be necessary.

Written Translation

The District will provide a written translation of vital documents for each limited English proficient group that constitutes at least 5 percent of the District’s total parent population or 1000 persons, whichever is less. For purposes of this policy, “vital documents” include, but are not limited to, those related to:

  • registration, application, and selection;
  • academic standards and student performance;
  • safety, discipline, and conduct expectations;
  • special education and related services, Section 504 information, and McKinney-Vento services;
  • policies and procedures related to school attendance;
  • requests for parent permission in activities or programs;
  • opportunities for students or families to access school activities, programs, and services;
  • student/parent handbook;
  • the District’s Language Access Plan and related services or resources available;
  • school closure information; and
  • any other documents notifying parents of their rights under applicable state laws and/or containing information or forms related to consent or filing complaints under federal law, state law, or District policy.

If the District is unable to translate a vital document due to resource limitations or if a small number of families require the information in a language other than English such that document translation is unreasonable, or if the families cannot read, the District will still provide the information to parents in a language they can understand through competent oral interpretation.

Staff Guidance

All school administrators, particularly those who have the most interaction with the public such as registrars and enrollment staff, certificated staff and other appropriate staff as determined by the superintendent, will receive guidance on meaningful communication with LEP parents, best practices for working with an interpreter, how to access an interpreter or translation services in a timely manner, language services available within the District and other information deemed necessary by the superintendent to effectuate the language access plan.

Appropriate district staff, as determined by the superintendent, will also receive guidance on the interaction between this policy and the District’s policy on effective communication with students, families, and community members with disabilities.

The superintendent is authorized to establish procedures and practices for implementing this policy.

Cross references:
3210 Nondiscrimination
4129 Family Involvement
4217 Effective Communication

Legal references:
Chapter 28A.642 RCW Discrimination prohibition
Chapter 49.60 RCW Discrimination – Human Rights Commission
Chapter 392-400 WAC Discipline
WAC 392-400-215 Student rights
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Management resources:
2016 – July Issue
OSPI website: Interpretation and Translation Services

Adoption Date: 09/22/2016
Raymond School District #116



 4218P‑Procedure Language Access Plan

The following procedures are intended to implement Policy 4218, establish meaningful, two-way communication between the District and parents with limited English proficiency (LEP), and promote access for such parents to the programs, services, and activities of the District.

Definitions

1. Persons with “limited English proficiency” (“LEP”) are individuals who are unable to communicate effectively in English either verbally or in writing, or both, because their primary language is not English and they have not developed fluency in the English language. A person with LEP may have difficulty in one or more of four domains of language: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Staff are urged to remember that LEP may be context-specific—e.g., a parent may have sufficient English language skills to understand, communicate and/or exchange basic information with a teacher, but they may not have sufficient skills to communicate detailed, specific information needed in a particular context, like an IEP meeting, a 504 meeting, or a student discipline hearing.

2. “LEP parent(s)” refers to the parent(s) or guardian(s) of a student or students enrolled in the District who have limited English proficiency, even if the student is proficient in English. This term does not include family members of the student other than their parent(s) or guardian(s).

3. “Primary language” means the primary language spoken by a student’s parent or guardian, or the predominant language spoken in the student’s home. Parents may have more than one primary language and/or dialect.

4. “Language services” refers to a broad spectrum of services used or required to facilitate communication and understanding between speakers of different languages, and typically includes interpretation and translation services.

5. “Interpretation” means the act of contemporaneous communication between a speaker of English and a speaker of another language wherein the words of one person are communicated to others orally in a different language.

The District will take reasonable steps to utilize interpreters who have demonstrated language proficiency through certification or who are employed by a particular vendor or service contracted to provide interpretation services.

6. “Translation” means the written communication between a speaker of English and a speaker of another language where in the written words of one person are communicated to others in writing in a different language.

B. Parent Identification

  1. Upon student enrollment and periodically through a student’s education, schools will utilize a survey to identify parents who need language access services and the languages in which they may need assistance. The survey will be translated into the most commonly known languages spoken in the district and will be included in the standard enrollment packet provided to all District parents.
  2. Schools must determine within thirty (30) days of a student’s enrollment the primary language spoken by the parent of each student enrolled in the school, and if such language is not English, whether the parent requires language services in order to communicate effectively with the school or District.
  3. Schools will maintain an appropriate and current record of the primary language spoken by a student’s parents, and such record will be available to the District.

C. Interpretation and Translation Services

1. Each school and District office will, consistent with this policy and procedure, provide free oral interpretation services to all parents who require language services in order to communicate effectively during any interaction with the District significant to the student’s education. Additionally, each school and District office will provide free translation of vital documents as required below in Section 8.

2. All interpretation and translation will be provided by competent and fluent speakers of that language as demonstrated by certification or similar means. The District will take reasonable steps to ensure that interpreters and translators have the knowledge in both languages of any specialized terms or concepts to be used in the communication at issue, and that they have been trained in the role of an interpreter or translator, the ethics of interpreting and translating, and the need to maintain confidentiality.

In the event that the District cannot provide an interpreter that is either certified or employed by a vendor to provide interpretation services after taking all reasonable steps to do so, the District must still take reasonable steps to ensure that the interpreter utilized is trained regarding the role of an interpreter, the ethics of interpreting and translating, and the need to maintain confidentiality.

3. Parents may voluntarily choose to decline the District’s offer of an interpreter and choose instead to rely on an adult friend/companion or relative for language and interpretation services, but school staff may not suggest this as an alternative to providing appropriate language and interpretation services.

Students and other minor children under the age of 18 may not serve as interpreters for school staff and parents during any formal or informal meeting or process.

4. The District will facilitate staff access to appropriate interpretation and translation services in order to communicate with LEP parents consistent with federal and/or state law and this policy and procedure. If no interpreter can be present, District staff should utilize a language bank, resource line or online service to communicate with parents.

5. The following interpretation and translation services are currently available in the District: [District note: Include here a list of interpretation and translation services available within the District, with instructions for accessing them].

District staff will be informed of when and how to access interpretation and translation services available within the District and the administrator responsible for ensuring the availability of such services. District staff may contact, the superintendent, by phone at (360) 942-3415 sholland@raymondk12.org with questions or concerns, or to obtain information or assistance regarding interpretation and translation services.

6. District administrators, including those involved with registration and enrollment, certificated staff and other appropriate staff as determined by the superintendent, will receive guidance and information regarding:

a. the rights of LEP parents under state and federal law to language access services provided by the District;

b. the importance of meaningfully and effectively communicating with LEP parents;

c. the most effective ways to communicate with LEP parents regarding the District’s available language services;

d. the importance of utilizing competent translation and interpretation services when communicating with LEP parents;

e. the availability of translation and interpretation services within the District, whether through in-person interpretation, telephonic services, online services, or video-conferencing;

f. the mechanisms and processes for accessing translation and interpretation services when working with LEP parents, including ensuring the correct language service is being accessed, checking LEP parent understanding once interpretation has commenced, and proper vetting of translations for audience-appropriate content; and

g. the process for reporting concerns or complaints.

7. Interpretation Services: Whenever requested by a parent or whenever school staff or District officials can reasonably anticipate that interpretation services are necessary to meaningfully communicate with parents regarding important information about their child’s education or school activities, the District will provide interpretation services in accordance with this procedure.

Such interpretation services may be provided either at the location where the parent is seeking to communicate or by electronic means, such as telephone or video conferencing.

Upon three days’ notice that such services are required, the District will provide interpretation services at public meetings organized or sponsored by the District (e.g., board meetings).

8. Translation of Vital District Documents: The District will identify vital documents which are distributed or electronically communicated to all or substantially all parents containing important information regarding a student’s education, including but not limited to:

a. registration, application, and selection;

b. academic standards and student performance;

c. safety, discipline, and conduct expectations;

d. special education and related services, Section 504 information, and McKinney-Vento services;

e. policies and procedures related to school attendance;

f. requests for parent permission in activities or programs;

g. opportunities for parents to access school activities, programs, and services;

h. student/parent handbook;

i. the District’s Language Access Plan and related services or resources available;

j. school closure information; and

k. any other documents notifying parents of their rights under applicable state laws and/or containing information or forms related to consent or filing complaints under federal law, state law, or District policy.

The District will provide a written translation of vital documents for each LEP group that constitutes at least 5 percent of the District’s total parent population or 1000 persons, whichever is less. If the District is unable to translate a document due to resource limitations or if a small number of parents require the information in a language other than English such that document translation is unreasonable, the District will still provide the information to parents in a language they can understand, such as through oral interpretation of the document.

Written translations of vital documents by machine/computer translation programs will not be used or issued to LEP parents without prior review by a District-approved translator.

All documents and information posted or issued by the District for parents should contain a notice in appropriate language(s) that free translation and/or interpretation services are available and how to request a free translation or interpretation of the document.

9. Translation of Student-Specific Documents: The District will take all reasonable steps to provide parents, in a language they can understand, a translation of any document that contains individual, student-specific information regarding, but not limited to, a student’s:

a. health;

b. safety;

c. legal or disciplinary matters; and

d. entitlement to public education, eligibility for special education services, placement in the English Language Learner Program (ELL), the Highly Capable Program, accelerated courses such as Advanced Placement, or any other non-standard academic program.

10. Alternatives to Translation: When translation for a document otherwise required to be translated is unavailable or cannot be done, such as in an emergency situation, a school or District office will provide an attached notice to parents in appropriate language(s) that free translation and/or interpretation services are available and how to request a free translation or interpretation of the document.

D. Providing Information to Parents

1. District staff and parents will be annually notified of this policy. Staff will be regularly provided written guidance regarding how and when interpretation and translation services should be accessed and such guidance will be updated as needed to reflect available services.

2. Parents will also be annually notified regarding the process for filing complaints through the District’s nondiscrimination policy and procedure if they believe that such services have not been appropriately provided.

3. The District will take steps to ensure that, at the time of enrollment, information regarding available interpretation and translation services and the District’s complaint process is provided to any parent (s) when there is reason to believe that the student’s parent(s) may have LEP (e.g., results of home language survey, a parent’s request for an interpreter). The District will take reasonable steps to provide information required by this section in the primary language spoken predominantly in the home.

4. Schools and District offices will post in a conspicuous location at or near the primary entrance to the school or office a sign in primary languages spoken in the District concerning the rights of parents to translation and interpretation services and how to access such services.

5. To the extent practicable, the District website will provide information in designated languages concerning the rights of parents to translation and interpretation services under federal and state law and how to access such services.

E. The Collection and Analysis of LEP Data

1. The District will periodically collect and analyze data related to LEP so as to assemble a list of primary languages spoken predominantly in the homes of students and their parents. Such information will help to ensure the provision of appropriate language access services and assist the District in effectively planning and budgeting for services necessary to communicate with students and their parents.

2. Such data may be collected by parent surveys.



 4220—COMPLAINTS CONCERNING STAFF OR PROGRAMS

Constructive criticism can be helpful to the district. At the same time, the board has confidence in its staff and programs and shall act to protect them from unwarranted criticism or disruptive interference. Complaints received by the board or a board member shall be referred to the superintendent for investigation.

The superintendent shall develop procedures to handle complaints concerning staff or programs. Complaints regarding instructional materials should be pursued in the manner provided for in policy 2020 (Curriculum Development and Adoption of Instructional Materials).

Legal References:
RCW 28A.405.300 Adverse change in contract status of certificated employee—Determination of probable cause –Notice–Opportunity for hearing
RCW 42.30 Open Public Meetings Act

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



 4220P—COMPLAINTS CONCERNING STAFF OR PROGRAMS

Most complaints can be resolved by informal discussions between the citizen and the staff member. Should the matter not be resolved, the principal shall attempt to resolve the issue through a conference with the citizen and the staff member.

The following procedures apply to the processing of a complaint which cannot be resolved in the manner described above:

A. If the problem is not satisfactorily resolved at the building level, the citizen should file a written complaint with the superintendent which describes the problem, and a suggested solution. The superintendent should send copies to the principal and staff member.

B. The principal and staff member shall respond to the superintendent in writing or in person.

C. The superintendent shall then attempt to resolve the matter through a conference with the citizen, staff member, and principal.

D. If the matter is still not resolved, the superintendent shall present the issue to the board. If the complaint is against a staff member, the complaint shall be handled in executive session in the presence of the staff member. The board shall attempt to make a final resolution of the matter. Any formal actions by the board must take place at an open meeting. If such action may adversely affect the contract status of the staff member, the board shall give written notice to the staff member of his/her rights to a hearing.



 4235—PUBLIC PERFORMANCES

The board recognizes the scholastic and social values that may be derived from student participation in various activities sponsored by community organizations.

Students may perform as a representative of the district, any school or other organization of the district subject to the approval of the principal. Permission and approval to perform as a representative of the school or district shall be contingent upon the principal’s determination that such participation is in the best interests of the student, school and district.

While students may perform in traditional musical events during the holiday season, a school-sponsored group shall not perform or make such presentations in a worship service.

The activity, program, performance or contest under consideration shall have educational value consistent with the goals and objectives of the district. Participation shall not result in exploitation of or liability to the student, school or district. Students shall not receive any remuneration for performing as representatives of the school or district.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 4230 Contacts with Students

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4237—CONTESTS, ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS

Any club, association or other organization must have prior approval for students’ participation in any contest, advertising campaign or promotion. Approval may be given by the superintendent following recommendation by the teacher and principal. Criteria to be used are:

A. The objectives of the contest, campaign, or promotion shall be consistent with the district’s goals and policies;

B. The proposed activity shall have educational value to the participants and be free of objectionable advancement of the name, product or special interest of the sponsoring group; and

C. Participation by a student shall not interfere with his/her program of curricular or co-curricular activities.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 3220, Freedom of Expression

Legal Reference:
AGO 1995.00 1995 No. 3 Use of Districts’ Facilities by Student Groups for Religious Purposes

Adoption Date: 12/29/00
Raymond School District #116



 4260—USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES

The board believes that public schools are owned and operated by and for the community. The public is encouraged to use school facilities, but will be expected to reimburse the district for such use to ensure that funds intended for education are not used for other purposes. On recommendation of the superintendent, the board will set the rental rates schedule.

The superintendent is authorized to establish procedures for use of school facilities, including rental rates, supervisory requirements, restrictions, and security. Those using school facilities will maintain insurance for accident and liability covering persons using the district’s facilities under the sponsorship of the organization.

The district does not discriminate based on race, creed, religion, color, national origin, age, honorably-discharged veteran or military status, sex, sexual orientation including gender expression or identity, marital status, the presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal by a person with a disability and provides equal access to Boy Scouts of America and other designated youth groups.

Community athletics programs that use district facilities will not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the operation, conduct or administration of their programs. The district will provide copies of the district’s nondiscrimination policy to all third parties using district facilities.

For rental rate purposes, organizations seeking the use of school facilities have been divided into three categories:

School or Child-Related Groups or Other Government Agencies

School or Child-related Groups or Other Government Agencies include those organizations whose main purpose is to promote the welfare of students, or to provide members of the community access to government programs or opportunities for civic participation. Examples are: Scouts, Campfire, PTA, 4-H, city or county sponsored recreation groups, polling places, political caucuses and governmental groups. The district will provide official recruiting representatives of the state and United States military forces, Job Corps, Peace Corps and AmeriCorps with access to school facilities (including number of days and type of presentation space) equal to and no less than the access provided to other post-secondary occupational or educational representatives.

When facilities are used outside of regular school hours, or when the district incurs extra utility, cleaning or supervision costs, a fee, established by the superintendent, will be charged to recoup those costs. Additionally, youth organizations engaged in sports activities and using school facilities must provide a statement of compliance with the policies for the management of concussion and head injury in youth sports as required by RCW 28A.600.

Nonprofit Groups

Nonprofit groups and organizations may use school facilities for lectures, promotional activities, rallies, entertainment, college courses, or other activities for which public halls or commercial facilities generally are rented or owned. The district may charge a rental rate in excess of costs incurred. Excess charges may be waived when a service club or other nonprofit group is raising funds for charitable purposes.

Professional fund raisers representing charities must provide evidence that they are registered and bonded by the state of Washington. Such fund-raisers must provide evidence that the charity will receive at least sixty (60) percent of the gross revenues received from the public prior to approval to use the facilities.

Similar treatment may be granted public universities and colleges when offering college courses within the community or when any university/college is offering a course for staff at the request of the district. Nonprofit groups of the kind that in most communities have their own facilities (churches, lodges, veterans groups, granges, etc.) who wish to use district facilities on a regular, but temporary, basis may do so under this rental rate,.

Commercial Enterprises

Commercial Enterprises include profit-making organizations and business-related enterprises. While the district would prefer these organizations use commercial or private facilities, facilities may be rented for non-regular use at the prevailing rate charged by commercial facilities in the area.

District-sponsored activities, including curricular and co-curricular functions, retain first priority in use of facilities. Authorization for use of school facilities will not be considered as endorsement or approval of the activity, group or organization.

Cross References:
Policy 3422 Student Sports – Concussion and Head Injuries

Legal References:
RCW 4.24.660 Liability of school districts under contracts with youth programs
RCW 28A.230.180 Access to campus and student information directories by official recruiting representatives — Informing students of educational and career opportunities.
RCW 28A.320.510 Night schools, summer schools, meetings, use of facilities for.
RCW 28A.335.150 Permitting use and rental of playgrounds, athletic fields, or athletic facilities.
RCW 28A.335.155 Use of buildings for youth programs — Limited immunity.
20 USC Sec. 7905 Boys Scout of America Equal Access Act
34 CFR Sec. 108.6 Equal Access to Public School Facilities For The Boy Scouts of America and Other Designated Youth Groups
AGO 1973 No. 26 School districts — Use of school facilities for presentation of programs — Legislature — Elections

Management Resources:
Policy and Legal News, February 2014 Other updates/corrections
Policy and Legal News, July, 2013 Equal access to K-12 campuses law goes into effect
Policy and Legal News, June 2013 Use of School Facilities policy clarification
Policy News, December 2011 Changes in WSSDA’s Policy Reference Manual
Policy News, August 2009 Concussion and Head Injuries Legislation

Adoption Date: 5/22/14
Raymond School District #116



4260P—USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES

Application for use of school facilities shall be made to the facilities coordinator.

Professional fund raisers representing charities must provide evidence that the fund raiser:

A. Is recognized by the Philanthropic Division of the Better Business Bureau;

B. Is registered and bonded by the state of Washington; and

C. Will give the charity at least sixty (60) percent of the gross revenues.

The superintendent shall develop and recommend to the board a fee schedule applicable for use of school facilities. The fee schedule shall be evaluated on a biennial basis.

Sponsoring organizations shall provide sufficient, competent adult and/ or special supervision, and the amount of adequate supervision shall be agreed upon at the time the authorization is issued.

Alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs shall not be permitted in school facilities or on school property at any time. Tobacco use is prohibited in school facilities and on school property.

All applicants for use of school facilities shall hold the district free and without harm from any loss or damage, liability or expense that may arise during or be caused in any way by such use or occupancy of school facilities. Also, in the event that property loss or damage is incurred during such use or occupancy, the amount of damage shall be decided by the superintendent and approved by the board and a bill for damages shall be presented to the group using or occupying the facilities during the time the loss or damage was sustained.

Additionally, youth organizations engaged in sports activities and using school facilities must submit a signed statement of compliance with the policies, described in RCW 28A.600 for the management of concussion and head injury in youth sports.

The superintendent possesses the authority to make the decision on use of school facilities by a group. The group may appeal such decision to the board.

Because of the value of district’s playing fields to the community’s total recreational opportunity, the fields may be used by all residents. The use must be appropriate and compatible with each play field and its surrounding area. Such use shall not result in destruction, damages, or undue wear or pose a hazard to children or others. Activities which endanger others or cause damage to fields and lawns are restricted. Should damage to fields and lawns occur, the superintendent shall make reasonable effort to obtain restitution for the damage.

A custodian or other authorized staff member must be on the premises when any nonschool group is using school facilities.

Adoption Date: 10/22/09
Raymond School District #116



4260F‑RAYMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT

RAYMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT
APPLICATION AND AGREEMENT FOR USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES

Group/Individual Making Request Date

Type of Meeting, Name of Course, etc.

Approximate Number Attending Is meeting open to public?

Name of Contact Person

Address Phone

Facility Desired (Cafeteria, Classroom, Gym)

Date(s) Desired Time: From To

Key(s) Issued Date (Keys) to be Returned

Name of school district employee present during use of facilities (if any)

Equipment Desired (P.A. System, Audio-Visual Equipment, Tables, Chairs, etc.)

THE ABOVE APPLICATION FOR USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES IS APPROVED SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS:

Liabilities and Procedures:

1. Application for use of school facilities shall be made through the principal’s office.

2. The superintendent shall determine a fee schedule applicable for use of District facilities. The fee schedule shall be evaluated on an annual basis. The superintendent shall make any reduction or waiver of the fee.

3. Sponsoring organizations shall provide sufficient, competent adult and/or special supervision, and the amount of the adequate supervision will be agreed upon at the time the authorization is issued.

4. Alcoholic beverages and other narcotics will not be permitted in school facilities or on school property at any time. Smoking is not permitted on school property.

5. All applicants for the use of District facilities shall hold the District free and without harm from any loss or damage, liability or expense that may arise during or be caused in any way by such use or occupancy of District facilities. Also, in the event that property loss or damage is incurred during such use or occupancy, the amount of damage shall be decided by the superintendent based on actual costs of repair including labor and materials. A bill for damages will be presented to the group using or occupying the facilities during the time the loss or damage was sustained.

6. The superintendent possesses the authority to make the final decision on use of school facilities by a group. However, the group may appeal such decision to the Board of Directors.

7. Because of the value of the District’s playing fields to the community’s total recreational opportunity, the fields may be used by all residents. However, the use must be appropriate and compatible with each playfield and its surrounding area. Such use shall not result in destruction, damages or undue wear or pose a hazard to children or others. Activities which endanger others or cause damage to fields and lawns are restricted. Should damage to fields and lawns occur, the superintendent shall make reasonable effort to obtain restitution for the damage.

8. Due to the liability factor, when using the weight room, a minimum of two people must be in the weight room at all times. At least one must be adult at 18 years old.

9. Only designated individuals shall be issued a key. The key shall be issued only for the duration of the use and shall be turned in when the use is completed. A Facilities Use Form will be approved prior to the key being issued.

10. If individuals given a key are found to misuse the privilege of having the key, the following consequences will take place:
a. The individual will conference with the principal. The situation will be discussed and the problem will be solved. If deemed necessary by the principal, the individual’s key will be returned.
b. Such problems could result in the individual not being issued another key in the future.
c. If key(s) should be lost, the individual is responsible for the cost of replacement of the keys and any additional costs incurred in maintaining the security of the facility.

11. To ensure that appropriate security measures are understood, the principal will instruct each person checking out a key and/or using the facility in the following areas: Building security, appropriate supervision of individuals during the activity, proper care (including janitorial cleanup) of the portion of the facilities which are to be used, and consequences if appropriate rules are not followed.

12. Individuals using the facility will be responsible for their own medical coverage in case of accident or injury and will hold the district harmless of any medical damages. The district cannot and will not provide participant coverage for those individuals using the facilities.

13. Individuals using the facility will be restricted to occupying only designated areas and will not be allowed to loiter in non-designated areas.

14. In using gyms, the user will see that all participants use standard approved gym shoes. Gym shoes worn outside and into the gym are unacceptable.

15. Facilities should be signed for at least THREE school days before date requested.

Anticipated Financial Obligation:

1. A custodian or authorized staff member must be on the premises for insurance purposes when any nonschool group is using a District facility. Alternatively, an organization that uses the facility may provide proof of insurance.
2. The user will assume additional expenses incurred for cooks, janitors, or supervisors when it becomes necessary to pay salaries beyond regular hours or it becomes necessary to clean an area not properly cleaned by user.
3. Use of the kitchen requires a child nutrition services staff person to supervise the kitchen during the activity. The user will assume the expense for the staff person not to exceed $24.50 per hour. In addition, there will be a non-refundable $25.00 fee for kitchen use by non-school groups.

Refundable Damage/Cleaning Deposit $100 (may be waived for non-commercial use)

Anticipated Charges:

-Garbage Fee $25.00

-Food Service hours @ per hour = $

-Custodial hours @ per hour = $

-Audio/Visual

-Special Instructions

-Organization/Agency addendum attached

The renter/user______________________________agrees to indemnify and hold harmless Raymond School District #116, its appointed and elected officials and employees while acting within the scope of their duties as such, from and against all claims, demands, loss, liability of any kind and character, including costs of defense, arising out of or in any way connected with the renter/user’s use of the school facilities specified in this Agreement.

This form shall be signed and returned to the superintendent or his/her designee prior to any use by the renter/user of school facilities covered by this Agreement.

BY SIGNING BELOW THE GROUP/INDIVIDUAL HEREBY AGREE(S) TO ABIDE BY THE ABOVE REGULATIONS AND ALL OTHER TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT. I UNDERSTAND THAT THE ABOVE COSTS ARE ESTIMATES AND ACTUAL COSTS MAY VARY ACCORDING TO USE.

By_____________________________(Group or Individual Making Request)

RAYMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT

By____________________________Date Approved
Building Principal

By Date Approved
Superintendent

Organization/Agency Addendum

The Raymond School District (RSD) desires to help other governmental agencies whenever possible in their mission to serve our community. When using RSD facilities, such organizations and RSD agree to abide by the attached facility use agreement as well as these requirements:

1. There will be no charge for use of the facilities, other than any actual costs incurred by the district for provided services or for the repair of any damage caused by the agency.

2. A single key and/or digital pass-card will be issued to the agency. It is the responsibility of the agency to maintain control of these entry keys at all times. They are not to be loaned to anyone outside of the agency or use for any other purpose than to support the mission of the agency.

3. If the key and/or pass-card are lost, the agency will immediately contact the District office to inform them of the loss.

4. Governmental agencies must provide proof of insurance prior to use of RSD facilities.

5. The agency is responsible to ensure that any RSD facilities used are secure prior to leaving.

6. It is the responsibility of the agency to schedule any long-term, regular use of the facilities. It is recognized that school activities take precedence over any unscheduled agency activities.

7. This agreement may be canceled at any time by either party.

BY SIGNING BELOW THE GROUP/INDIVIDUAL HEREBY AGREE(S) TO ABIDE BY THE ABOVE REGULATIONS AND ALL OTHER TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT. I UNDERSTAND THAT THE ABOVE COSTS ARE ESTIMATES AND ACTUAL COSTS MAY VARY ACCORDING TO USE.

By____________________________ ______________ of ____________________________
Title Agency

Date Signed

By Date Approved
Superintendent

Revised March 2018



4265—COMMUNITY SCHOOLS’ PROGRAM

As a method of extending educational opportunities to the entire community through a fuller utilization of school facilities, a community schools’ program may be established. The program shall be financed primarily by federal or state funds, participation fees, contributions, or some combination these sources.

The superintendent shall establish and periodically present to the board for review, an organizational plan and tentative program that shall assure that the program is responsive to the varying needs of citizens living in different sections of the community.

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.620.020 Community education programs–Restrictions

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4300—POLITICAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES

The board recognizes and encourages the right of its employees, as citizens, to engage in political activity. School property and school time, supported by public funds, may not be used for political purposes.

District employees, when authorized by the board or superintendent, may provide information or communicate on matters pertaining to school district affairs or advocate the official position or interests of the district to any elected official or officer or employee of any agency. The district shall submit quarterly statements in compliance with requirements of the Public Disclosure Commission.

District employees who hold elective or appointive public office in an organization are not entitled to time off from their school duties for reasons incident to such offices except as such time may qualify under leave policies of the district.

The superintendent is directed to establish procedures that are in compliance with the Public Disclosure Commission.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 5224 Staff Participation in Political Activities
Board Policy 5525 Professional, Civic and Service Organizations

Legal Reference:
RCW 42.17.130 Forbids use of public office or agency facilities in campaigns
RCW 42.17.190 Legislative activities of state agencies and other units of government

Adoption Date: 5/22/01
Raymond School District #116



4300P—POLITICAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES

All “lobbying” activities on behalf of the school district shall be conducted under the direction of the superintendent and/or board. For purposes of this procedure, “lobbying” means attempting to influence the passage or defeat of any legislation or the adoption or rejection of any rule, standard, rate or other legislative enactment by any state agency.

The district shall file a quarterly report (PDC Form L-5) with the Public Disclosure Commission when “in person lobbying” exceeds four days or parts of days during any three month period in aggregate for all employees at the district. In person lobbying includes testifying at legislative committee hearings and state agency hearings on rules and regulations but does not include attendance merely to monitor or observe testimony and debate. Quarterly reports are due at the Public Disclosure Commission on or before April 30, July 31, October 31 and January 3.

District funds shall not be expended for dinners, entertainment or campaign contributions.



4301—IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS AND LICENSING OF BUSINESS

The board believes that the district should not affect a community’s decision to form or not to form improvement districts for purposes of upgrading utilities or roads.

The board shall, therefore, consider petitions presented by the district patrons for formation of improvement districts only after owners of more than fifty percent of the affected property (exclusive of district property) have approved such a plan.

The board reserves the right to initiate action for development of improvement districts when, in the opinion of the board, it is in the best interest of the district.

The board also believes the immediate environs of school sites should be conducive to educational activities and free of industrial or commercial activities which may create health and/or safety hazards for students or staff. The district goes on record opposing the licensing of a premises by the liquor control board within 500 feet of a school building.

Legal References:
RCW 66.24.010 Issuance, transferability –Conditions and restrictions–Notice to local authorities –Proximity to churches, schools, etc.

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4310—District Relationships with Law Enforcement and other Government Agencies

The primary responsibility for maintaining proper order and conduct in the schools resides with district staff. Staff will be responsible for holding students accountable for infractions of school rules, which may include minor violations of the law occurring during school hours or at school activities.

However, there are times when district staff will call upon law enforcement, child protective agencies, and the county health department to ensure the safety and protection of students or staff. When there is substantial threat to the health and safety of students or others, such as in the case of bomb threats, threats of violence, or threats of substantial bodily harm, law enforcement will be called upon for assistance. Information regarding major violations of the law will be communicated to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

The district will strive to develop and maintain cooperative working relationships with law enforcement, child protective authorities, and health department officials. The superintendent will confer with representatives of these agencies to establish agreed upon procedures. Such procedures should address the handling/reporting of child abuse and neglect allegations/investigations; communicable disease allegations/investigations; criminal allegations/investigations, including bomb threats/other threat assessment, and arrests by law enforcement officers on school premises; the availability of law enforcement personnel for crowd control; and other matters where the work and duties of the district overlap with these agencies. Such procedures include 3432P – Emergencies and 3226P Interviews and Interrogations of Students on School Premises. The district will revise the procedures as necessary and make them available to affected staff members.

If the district engages with a school resource officer (SRO), the district will clarify its relationship with the SRO, including the SRO’s purpose, role, supervisory structure, and limitations on access to student information in a written memorandum of understanding (MOU).

In contrast to the working relationships noted above, the work of immigration agents does not overlap with the work or duties of the district. This is because the district’s obligation to educate the children residing within its borders is not diminished by the children or parents’ immigration status. Further, the district supports the federal immigration enforcement policy that directs immigration agents to avoid questioning and arrests at sensitive locations, including schools. Therefore, staff shall not grant information or access to immigration agents unless/until the district Superintendent and/or General Counsel determine the request complies with Plyler v. Doe and other applicable laws according to the criteria in 3226P Interviews and Interrogations of Students on School Premises.

Child Protective Services or agencies and law enforcement are defined as stated in RCW 26.44.020. County health department means a local entity defined in RCW 70.05.010. “Immigration agent” shall mean an agent of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, any individuals authorized to conduct enforcement of civil immigration laws under 8 U.S.C. §1357(g) or any other federal law, other federal agents charged with enforcement of civil immigration laws, and any successors.

Cross References: 3432 – Emergencies
3414 – Infectious Diseases
3231 – Student Records
3226 – Interviews and Interrogations of Students on School Premises

 

Legal References: RCW 26.44.030 Interviews of children
RCW 26.44.050 – Abuse or neglect of child — Duty of law enforcement agency or department of social and health services — Taking child into custody without court order, when
RCW 26.44.110 Information about rights — Custody without court order — Written statement required — Contents
RCW 26.44.115 Child taken into custody under court order — Information to parents
RCW 28A.635.020 Willfully disobeying school administrative personnel or refusing to leave public property, violations, when — Penalty
20 U.S.C. 1232g Family Education Rights and Privacy Act

 

Management Resources: 2018 – December Issue

2013 – July Issue

2013 – April Issue
Policy News, April 2001 Compliance Office Provides FERPA Update
Policy News, February 1998 FERPA limits student records access

 

Adoption Date: 3/26/19
Classification: Encouraged
Revised Dates: 12.11; 04.13; 07.13; 12.18



4310P—RELATIONS WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES

A. A law enforcement officer shall contact the principal upon entering a school building.

B. An officer may request and be granted such student information as address, telephone number, parents’ names, date of birth and other directory information, if the parent or student over 18 years of age has not filed a written objection to the release of directory information. Student records protected by the federal Family Rights and Privacy Act may only be examined or released following written permission of a minor student’s parent or an adult student, pursuant to a court order or subpoena, in response to a health or safety emergency, or in order to better serve the student in the juvenile justice system prior to adjudication.

C. The district encourages interrogations of students to take place off school premises, in order to minimize interruption to the instructional program.

When an onsite interview/interrogation is warranted by the circumstances of the case and the student is over twelve (12) years of age, the principal or designee shall make a reasonable effort to first contact the parent(s)/legal guardian(s) or if they can’t be contacted a designated adult noted on the students emergency contact card, for their consent. Parent contact will not be required where the law enforcement indicates that allegations of child abuse or neglect are alleged. Law enforcement personnel must recognize the potential time delay for the parent to be contacted and a reasonable time for the parent to arrive if the parent chooses to be present. If unable to contact parents/guardians or a designated adult after a reasonable time, the officer may nevertheless proceed with the interview/interrogation when, in the judgment of the officer an emergency exists and further delay would impair the handling of that emergency. The officer shall advise and afford a student all legal rights required by law.

1. If a student is under twelve (12) years of age, parents/guardians or designated adult notification and permission is required before any interview interrogation will take place unless the single exception for child abuse or neglect is alleged.

D. An officer is not required to have a warrant in order for the school to release the student into law enforcement custody. In the event a student is taken into custody by a law enforcement officer, the school will immediately notify the parent or guardian unless prohibited by law enforcement because of a case of child abuse or neglect is involved, or some other similar, specified reason exists for prohibiting notification. School authorities shall request that this denial and the reasons for it be put in writing.

E. If a court has released a student on conditions related to school, including attendance, behavior or progress, the administration shall encourage the court to include as a condition of release the written permission of the adult student or parent of a minor student to release the student’s records to the court or its designee.

Relations with Child Protective Agencies

A. A child protective services worker shall contact the principal upon entering a school building.

B. A child protective worker may request and be granted such information as address, telephone number, parents’ names, date of birth and other directory information if the parent or student over 18 years of age has not filed a written objection to the release of directory information. Information contained in the student’s cumulative folder and any supplementary records shall be available for inspection on evidence that a student is a ward of the state. Student records protected by the federal Family Rights and Privacy Act may only be examined or released following written permission of a minor student’s parent or an adult student, pursuant to a court order or subpoena, in response to a health or safety emergency, or in order to better serve the student in the juvenile justice system prior to adjudication.

C. While the district encourages interviews of a student to take place off school premises, the principal shall permit a child protective worker to conduct any questioning when child abuse or neglect is involved outside of the presence of parents. Parental notification of the interview shall occur at the earliest possible point in the investigation that will not jeopardize the safety or protection of the child or the course of the investigation. Prior to commencing the interview, the child protective services or law enforcement agency shall determine whether the child wishes a third party to be present for the interview and, if so, shall make reasonable efforts to accommodate the child’s wishes. Unless the child objects, the child protective services or law enforcement agency shall make reasonable efforts to include a third party in any interview so long as the presence of the third party will not jeopardize the course of the investigation.

D. A child protective worker is required to have a warrant in order for the school to release custody of the student. However, if the child protective worker is accompanied by a law enforcement officer, no warrant shall be required. In the event a student is taken into custody, the school shall duly notify the parent or guardian unless directed not to by the law enforcement officer.

Relations with Health Department Officials

A. A health department official shall contact the principal on entering a school building.

B. A health department official may request and be granted such information as address and date of birth if the parent or student over 18 years of age has not filed a written objection to the release of directory information. Information contained in a student’s cumulative folder and any supplementary records shall be available only with prior written consent of the parent or adult student pursuant to a court order or subpoena, in response to a health or safety emergency or in order to better serve the student in the juvenile justice system prior to adjudication.

C. While the district encourages interviews of students to take place off school premises, the principal shall permit a health official to conduct a confidential interview with a student suspected of being a contact with an individual infected with a communicable disease when the interview is to be held during school hours, and the principal chooses not to release the student to travel to the health department

Adoption Date: 03/20/07
Raymond School District #116



4314—NOTIFICATION OF THREATS OF VIOLENCE OR HARM

Students and school employees who are subjects of threats of violence or harm shall be notified of the threats in a timely manner. Parents shall be included in notifications to students who are subjects of threats of violence or harm. If there is a specific and significant threat to the health or safety of a student or other individuals, the district may disclose information from education records to appropriate parties whose knowledge of the information is necessary. Timing and details of the notice will be as extensive as permitted by the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, other legal limitations, and the circumstances.

Individual-directed threats of violence or harm are communications that create fear of physical harm to a specific individual or individuals, communicated directly or indirectly by any means.

Building-directed threats of violence or harm are direct or indirect communications by any means of the intent to cause damage to a school building or school property (e.g., bomb threats), or to harm students, employees, volunteers, patrons or visitors.

The district will address threats of violence or harm in a manner consistent with the district’s safety policies and comprehensive safe school plans.

Persons found to have made threats of violence or harm against district property, students, employees or others will be subject to relevant district discipline policies and will be referred to appropriate community agencies including law enforcement and mental health services. District staff shall work with in-district and community-based professionals and services in all relevant disciplines to address threats of violence or harm, those threatened and those making the threats. Necessary information about the person making the threat shall be communicated by the principal to teachers and staff, including security personnel.

State law provides the district, school district directors and district staff with immunity from liability for providing notice of threats in good faith. Persons who make a knowingly false notification of a threat are subject to appropriate district discipline policies and may be referred for prosecution.

The superintendent is directed to develop and implement procedures consistent with this policy.

Cross References:

Board Policy 3143 District Notification of Juvenile Offenders
Board Policy 3207 Prohibition of Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying
Board Policy 3240 Student Conduct
Board Policy 3241 Classroom Management, Corrective Actions or Punishment
Board Policy 5281 Disciplinary Action or Discharge
Board Policy 6513 Workplace Violence Prevention

Legal References:

RCW 28A.320.128 Notice and disclosure policies — Threats of violence — student conduct
Immunity for good faith notice — Penalty
WAC 392-400 Pupils
20 U.S.C. § 1232g Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
34 C.F.R. Part 99 FERPA Regulations

Management Resources:
Policy News, February 2003 Threats Policy Due in September
Policy News, February 2010 Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Revisions

Adoption Date: 04/22/10
Raymond School District #116



4314P—NOTIFICATION OF THREATS OF VIOLENCE OR HARM

Staff, students, volunteers, and others involved in school activities have the responsibility to report any threats of violence or harm to designated school officials. Based on the significance and credibility of the threat, it shall be reported to law enforcement. Staff shall involve in-district multi-disciplinary professionals in evaluating the threat and the needs of the person making the threat. Consultation with or referrals to community-based professionals and services are encouraged where appropriate.

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act the district may only release student records, with parent or adult student permission or in a health or safety emergency. For that reason, the district will identify students who have made threats of violence or harm when notifying the subjects of the threats, under the following conditions:

A. The parent or adult student has given permission to disclose the student’s identity or other information to the subject of the student’s threat.

B. The identity of the student and the details of the threat are being disclosed to relevant district staff who have been determined to have legitimate educational interest in the information.

C. The identity of the student or the details of the threat are being released because the release of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. In making this determination, school officials shall use their best judgment, and may take into account the “totality of the circumstances” pertaining to the safety or health of a student or other individuals.

D. The district is responding to a court order or subpoena. The district must make a reasonable effort to notify the parents of the student or adult student of the subpoena in advance of complying, so that the family can seek protective action, unless the court order or subpoena expressly forbids such notification.

Relevant information about the threat that does not improperly identify a student shall be provided to the subject of the threat, and the subject shall be advised that if law enforcement has been involved in the matter, the law enforcement agency may have more information that can be shared with the subject.

To promote the safety of all concerned, the principal shall determine if classroom teachers, school staff, school security, and others working with the student(s) involved in the threat circumstance, should be notified. Subject to the confidentiality provisions cited above, principals shall consider all available information when determining the extent of information to be shared, including prior disciplinary records, official juvenile court records, and documented history of violence of the person who made the threat.

When considering the appropriate discipline for a student who has made a threat of violence or harm the student’s prior disciplinary records shall be taken into account. Emergency expulsion shall be considered, based on the credibility and significance of the threat. Discipline shall only be imposed on students with disabilities consistent with policy and the legal requirements for special education.

If the threat by a student was significant and credible enough to warrant expulsion, the student may only be readmitted to the district through the readmission application process provided for in district policy. The readmission application process shall include meeting district readmission criteria established at the time of expulsion and should include completion of an assessment by an appropriate professional, with a report to the district, when the district determines such an assessment is necessary.

Discipline against district staff for making threats of violence or harm shall be consistent with district policy and procedure regarding staff discipline, and any relevant collective bargaining requirements.

Adoption Date: 04/22/10
Raymond School District #116



4315—RELEASE OF INFORMATION CONCERNING SEXUAL AND KIDNAPPING OFFENDERS

Law enforcement agencies receive relevant information about the release of sexual and kidnapping offenders into communities. Law enforcement agencies decide when such information needs to be released to the public. The school district has a public safety role to play in the dissemination of such information to staff, parents, students and the community and will disseminate such information under the following conditions:

A. Receipt of a specific request from a law enforcement agency that information be disseminated to staff and/or students and parents. In every case where students are notified, parents will be notified as soon as possible.

B. Receipt of the actual sex offender documents to be distributed. The district may duplicate the sex offender documents, but they will be distributed in the form received from the law enforcement agency.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 3143 District Notification of Juvenile Offenders

Legal Reference:
RCW 4.24.550 Sex offenders — and kidnapping offenders — Release of information to public — When authorized — Immunity

Management Resources:
Policy News, August 1998 State encourages modification of weapons policy
Policy News, October 2010 Release of Sex Offender Information

Adoption Date: 12/21/10
Raymond School District #116



4320—COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS WITH OTHER DISTRICTS, Public Agencies, Private Schools and Daycare Agencies

Whenever it appears to the economic, administrative and educational advantage of the district to participate in cooperative programs with other units of local government, the superintendent will prepare and present for the board’s consideration an analysis of each cooperative proposal. Cooperative programs between two or more small school districts will not affect the small school factor of participating schools.

Cooperative agreements will comply with the requirements of the Interlocal Cooperation Act, with assurances that all parties to the agreement have the legal authority to engage in the activities contemplated by the agreement.

Private and Parochial Schools and Daycare Agencies

The district will cooperate with private and parochial schools, including day care agencies, both in federally assisted programs and in other aspects of district operations in ways that are permitted by law. The primary obligation of the district will be to its students, and such cooperation will not interfere with or diminish the quality of services offered to its students.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.350 Part-time students — Defined — Enrollment authorized — Reimbursement for costs — Funding authority recognition — Rules, regulations
RCW 28A.160.120 Agreements with other governmental entities for transportation of public or other noncommon school purposes — Limitations
Chapter 28A.205 RCW Education Centers
RCW 28A.225.250 Compulsory School Attendance and Admission — Cooperative programs among school districts — Rules
RCW 28A.235.120 Meal Programs — Establishment and operation — Personnel — Agreement
Chapter 39.34 RCW Interlocal Cooperation Act
Chapter 48.62 RCW Local Government Insurance
Chapter 392-135 WAC Finance — Interdistrict Cooperation Programs

Management Resources:
Policy News, October 2011 Policy Manual Revisions

Adoption Date: 12/12/11
Raymond School District #116



4330—COOPERATION WITH PRIVATE AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS AND DAY CARE AGENCIES

The district shall cooperate with private and parochial schools, including day care agencies, both in federally-assisted programs and other aspects of district operations in ways that are permitted by law. The primary obligation of the district shall be to its students, and such cooperation shall not interfere with or diminish the quality of services offered to its students.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.350 Part-time students–Defined–Enrollment authorized—Reimbursement for costs— Funding authority recognition—Rules, regulations
RCW 28A.235.120 Lunchrooms –Establishment and operation– Personnel for—Agreement for
RCW 28A.205 Educational Clinics
WAC 392-163-040 Non-public student involvement
WAC 392-168-045 Provision for private nonprofit school participation

Adoption Date: 10/27/98
Raymond School District #116



4400—ELECTION ACTIVITIES

The district, as part of its mission to educate and instill civic virtue, will assure that

public facilities are not be used to assist in any candidate’s campaign or to support or oppose any ballot measure, and will assure that the community is appropriately informed about district and education related ballot measures through objective and fair presentations of the facts related to those measures.

The board will consider adopting resolutions expressing the board’s collective opinion on ballot measures (state and local, including district levy and bond measures) that impact the effective operation of the schools. Such a resolution will be considered at a board meeting, the short title and proposition number of the ballot measure will be included in the meeting notice, and an equal opportunity will be provided for views on both sides of the issue to be expressed.

Prior to an election on a district ballot measure, the district will publish to the entire community an objective and fair presentation of the facts relevant to the ballot measure. Normal and regular publications of the district will also continue to be published during election cycles and may contain fair, objective and relevant discussions, of the facts of pending election issues.

The superintendent is directed to develop procedures for implementing this policy and communicating the policy and procedures to staff.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2022 Electronic Information System (K-20 Network)
Board Policy 5252 Staff Participation in Political Activities

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.320.090 Preparing and distributing information on the district’s instructional program, operation and maintenance-Limitation
RCW 42.17.130 Forbids use of public office or agency facilities in campaigns
WAC 390-05-271 General application of RCW 42.17.130
WAC 390-05-273 Definition of normal and regular conduct

Adoption Date: 12/18/01
Raymond School District #116


4400P—GUIDELINES FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IN ELECTION CAMPAIGNS*

Public Disclosure Law Re: Use of Public Facilities in Campaigns

Revised September 28, 2006

USE OF THE GUIDELINES

These Guidelines are meant to aid and assist in compliance with the law.

This document is an educational tool that is an expression of the Commission’s view of the meaning of RCW 42.17.130 and relevant administrative rules and case law involving local government and election campaign activity. It is intended to provide guidance regarding the Commission’s approach and interpretation of how the statutory prohibition on the use of public facilities for campaigns impacts activities that may be contemplated by government employees and other persons who may seek to utilize those public facilities. Readers are strongly encouraged to review the statute and rules referenced in these Guidelines.

For ease of reference, the majority of this interpretation is in chart form. In part, the chart identifies categories of persons, some possible activities, and some general considerations. These illustrative examples in the columns of the chart are not intended to be exhaustive.

For example, the categories of persons identified are, in many cases, illustrative only and simply identify groups of persons more likely to undertake or consider undertaking the activity mentioned in the adjacent columns. If an activity is described as being viewed as “Permitted,” it is viewed as permitted for all agency personnel otherwise having the authority under law or agency policy to undertake that action, not just the persons identified in the chart or in a particular column. The same approach is applied to the “Not Permitted” column. Further, the remarks in the chart’s “General Considerations” column have relevance for the entire section and are not limited to the specific bullet point immediately to the left of the general consideration.

As noted in the Basic Principles section below, hard and fast rules are difficult to establish for every fact pattern involving agency facilities that may occur.

*School Districts are directed to Guidelines for School Districts in Election Campaigns, Interpretation 01-03.

Situations may arise that are not squarely addressed by the guidelines or that merit additional discussion. The PDC urges government agencies to review the guidelines in their entirety, and to consult with their own legal counsel and with the PDC. The PDC can be reached at pdc@pdc.wa.gov, 360/753-1111 or toll free at 1-877-601-2828.

RCW 42.17.130

Use of public office or agency facilities in campaigns — Prohibition — Exceptions.

No elective official nor any employee of his [or her] office nor any person appointed to or employed by any public office or agency may use or authorize the use of any of the facilities of a public office or agency, directly or indirectly, for the purpose of assisting a campaign for election of any person to any office or for the promotion of or opposition to any ballot proposition. Facilities of a public office or agency include, but are not limited to, use of stationery, postage, machines, and equipment, use of employees of the office or agency during working hours, vehicles, office space, publications of the office or agency, and clientele lists of persons served by the office or agency. However, this does not apply to the following activities:

     (1) Action taken at an open public meeting by members of an elected legislative body or by an elected board, council, or commission of a special purpose district including, but not limited to, fire districts, public hospital districts, library districts, park districts, port districts, public utility districts, school districts, sewer districts, and water districts, to express a collective decision, or to actually vote upon a motion, proposal, resolution, order, or ordinance, or to support or oppose a ballot proposition so long as (a) any required notice of the meeting includes the title and number of the ballot proposition, and (b) members of the legislative body, members of the board, council, or commission of the special purpose district, or members of the public are afforded an approximately equal opportunity for the expression of an opposing view;

     (2) A statement by an elected official in support of or in opposition to any ballot proposition at an open press conference or in response to a specific inquiry;

     (3) Activities which are part of the normal and regular conduct of the office or agency.

Notes:

Finding — Intent — 2006 c 215: “(1) The legislature finds that the public benefits from an open and inclusive discussion of proposed ballot measures by local elected leaders, and that for twenty-five years these discussions have included the opportunity for elected boards, councils, and commissions of special purpose districts to vote in open public meetings in order to express their support of, or opposition to, ballot propositions affecting their jurisdictions.

     (2) The legislature intends to affirm and clarify the state’s long-standing policy of promoting informed public discussion and understanding of ballot propositions by allowing elected boards, councils, and commissions of special purpose districts to adopt resolutions supporting or opposing ballot propositions.” [2006 c 215 § 1.]

WAC 390-05-271

General applications of RCW 42.17.130.

(1) RCW 42.17.130 does not restrict the right of any individual to express his or her own personal views concerning, supporting, or opposing any candidate or ballot proposition, if such expression does not involve a use of the facilities of a public office or agency.

(2) RCW 42.17.130 does not prevent a public office or agency from (a) making facilities available on a nondiscriminatory, equal access basis for political uses or (b) making an objective and fair presentation of facts relevant to a ballot proposition, if such action is part of the normal and regular conduct of the office or agency.

WAC 390-05-273

Definition of normal and regular conduct.

Normal and regular conduct of a public office or agency, as that term is used in the proviso to RCW 42.17.130, means conduct which is (1) lawful, i.e., specifically authorized, either expressly or by necessary implication, in an appropriate enactment, and (2) usual, i.e., not effected or authorized in or by some extraordinary means or manner. No local office or agency may authorize a use of public facilities for the purpose of assisting a candidate’s campaign or promoting or opposing a ballot proposition, in the absence of a constitutional, charter, or statutory provision separately authorizing such use.

Similar prohibitions on the use of public facilities by state employees and state officers are described in a memorandum from the Attorney General’s Office regarding RCW 42.52 and available at http://www.atg.wa.gov/pubs/publicfundsmemo062800.htm

BASIC PRINCIPLES

1. Public facilities may not be used to support or oppose a candidate or ballot proposition. RCW 42.17.130. Facilities include local government agency equipment, buildings, supplies, employee work time, and agency publications. The statute includes an exception to the prohibition for “activities which are part of the normal and regular conduct of the office or agency.”

2. The Public Disclosure Commission holds that it is not only the right, but the responsibility of local government to inform the general public of the operational and maintenance issues facing local agencies. This includes informing the community of the needs of the agency that the community may not realize exist. Local governments may expend funds for this purpose provided that the preparation and distribution of information is not for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election.

3. Public employees do not forfeit their rights to engage in political activity because of their employment. Neither may agency employees be subjected to coercion, pressure, or undue influence to participate in political activity or to take a particular position. Public officials and employees should make it clear that any participation is personal rather than officially sponsored.

4. Supervisory personnel have a duty to know, apply, and communicate to their staffs the difference between acceptable information activities and inappropriate promotional activities in support of local government ballot measures.

5. Local elected officials are free to support agency ballot issues and engage in other political activities as long as such activities do not make use of government facilities, time or resources and do not either pressure or condone employees’ use of agency facilities, time or resources to support ballot issues.

6. The PDC is charged with enforcing RCW 42.17.130. This requires consideration and analysis of activities, which may or may not be determined to be in violation of the statute. The PDC has, over the years, developed methods of considering and analyzing activities engaged in by public offices. Among the factors considered are the normal and regular conduct and the timing, tone, and tenor of activities in relation to ballot measure elections. As in any matter where intent is to be considered, hard and fast rules, which will be applicable to all situations, are difficult to establish.

The combination of a number of activities into a coordinated campaign involving close coordination between agency activities and citizens’ committee activities which closely resembles traditional election campaign activities and which is targeted at and/or occurs close in time to a ballot measure election is likely to draw close scrutiny and careful consideration by the PDC as to whether a violation has occurred.

7.a. Historically, the PDC has routinely advised and held that with respect to election-related publications, one jurisdiction-wide objective and fair presentation of the facts per ballot measure is appropriate.

In addition, if an agency* has also customarily distributed this information through means other than a jurisdiction-wide mailing (e.g. regularly scheduled newsletter, website, bilingual documents, or other format), that conduct has also been permitted under RCW 42.17.130 so long as the activity has been normal and regular for the government agency.

b. The PDC will presume that every agency may distribute throughout its jurisdiction an objective and fair presentation of the facts for each ballot measure. If the agency distributes more than this jurisdiction-wide single publication, the agency must be able to demonstrate to the PDC that this conduct is normal and regular for that agency. In other words, the agency must be able to demonstrate that for other major policy issues facing the government jurisdiction, the agency has customarily communicated with its residents in a manner similar to that undertaken for the ballot measure.

c. Agencies are urged to read the definitions of “normal and regular” at WAC 390‑05‑271 and WAC 390-05-273. Agencies need to be aware, however, that in no case will the PDC view a marketing or sales effort related to a campaign or election as normal and regular conduct.

8. The PDC attributes publications or other informational activity of a department or subdivision as the product of the local agency as a whole.

9. Providing an objective and fair presentation of facts to the public of ballot measures that directly impact a jurisdiction’s maintenance and operation, even though the measure is not offered by the jurisdiction, may be considered part of the normal and regular conduct of the local agency. The agency must be able to demonstrate that for other major policy issues facing the jurisdiction, the agency has customarily communicated with its residents in a manner similar to that undertaken for the ballot measure.

10. State law provides certain exemptions from the prohibition on the use of public office or agency facilities in campaigns for an elected legislative body, an elected board, council or commission of a special purpose district, and elected officials that are not afforded appointed officials. RCW 42.17.130 (1) and (2) apply only to these elected bodies and elected officials.**

*Agency means any county, city, town, port district, special district, or other state political subdivision.

**See Chapter 215, Laws of 2006 and AGO 2005 No. 4.

Agency* Administrators
(County Administrator, City Manager, Executive Director, Fire Chief, PUD Manager, Etc.)

Permitted:
 May inform staff during non-work hours of opportunities to participate in campaign activities.

 Are encouraged to communicate to staff the difference between acceptable and unacceptable activities related to a ballot measure.

 In the course of normal publications for the agency, may distribute an objective and fair presentation of the facts based on and expanded upon the information prepared by the agency in accordance with the normal and regular conduct of the agency.

 May speak at community forums and clubs to present factual and objective information on a ballot measure during regular work hours.

 May encourage staff and members of the public to vote, as long as such encouragement routinely occurs for other elections.

 May respond to questions regarding a ballot measure if such activity is consistent with his or her normal and regular duties.

 May wear campaign buttons or similar items while on the job if the agency’s policy generally permits employees to wear political buttons.

 May engage in campaign activities on their own time, during non-work hours and without using public resources.

Not Permitted:

 Shall not pressure or coerce employees to participate in campaign activities.

 Shall not use internal memoranda solely for the purpose of informing employees of meetings supporting or opposing ballot measures.

 Shall not coordinate informational activities with campaign efforts, in a manner that makes the agency appear to be supporting or opposing a ballot measure.

 Shall not use public resources to operate a speakers’ bureau in a manner that may be viewed as promoting a ballot measure.

General Considerations:

 Has there been communications with staff and with union representatives regarding the prohibition on the use of the agency’s internal mail or email system to support or oppose a ballot measure?

 Is the distribution of this information consistent with the normal practices of the agency (such as newsletters, websites, or some other format)?

 Is the information provided an objective and fair presentation of the facts?

 Is the activity consistent with the agency’s normal and regular course of business?

 Do the materials accurately present the costs and other anticipated impacts of a ballot measure?

 

Persons: Community Groups
Permitted:
 May use agency facilities for meetings supporting or opposing a ballot measure to the extent that the facilities are made available on an equal access, nondiscriminatory basis, and it is part of the normal and regular activity of the jurisdiction.

 Shall not use agency facilities to produce materials that support or oppose a ballot measure.

Persons: Local Elected Legislative Body*

Permitted:
 May collectively vote to support or oppose a ballot measure at a properly noticed public meeting, where opponents of the measure are given an equal opportunity to express views.

Not Permitted:
 Shall not pressure or coerce agency management to participate in campaign activities.

 Shall not explicitly include passage of a ballot measure in the agency’s annual goals.

Persons: Local Government Elected Officials

Permitted:
 May engage in political activities on his or her own time, if no public equipment, vehicle or facility is used. (An elected official may use his or her title, but should clarify that he/she is speaking on his/her own behalf, and not on behalf of the agency. If the elected legislative body has adopted a resolution, the official can then speak on behalf of the agency.)

 May attend any function or event at any time during the day and voice his or her opinion about a candidate or ballot proposition as long as they are not being compensated and are not using any public equipment, vehicle or other facility.

Not Permitted:

 Shall not direct agency staff to perform tasks to support or oppose campaign activities or ballot measures.

 Shall not use public facilities or resources to engage in political activities.

General Considerations:
 Is the elected official using staff time, a public vehicle, or other public resources?

 Has the agency adopted a resolution? If yes, the elected official can speak on behalf of the agency. If not, has the elected official made it clear that he or she is not speaking on behalf of the agency?

Persons: Appointed Officials
(Boards, Commissions, and similar appointed positions)

Permitted:

 May engage in political activities on his or her own time, if no public equipment, vehicle or facility is used. An appointed official may use his or her title, but should clarify that he/she is speaking on his/her own behalf, and not on behalf of the agency.

 May attend any function or event at any time during the day and voice his or her opinion about a candidate or ballot proposition as long as they are not being compensated and are not using any public equipment, vehicle or other facility.

Not Permitted:

 Shall not direct agency staff to perform tasks to support or oppose campaign activities or ballot measures.

 Shall not use public facilities or resources to engage in political activities.

 Shall not use public facilities to express a collective decision or actually vote upon a motion or resolution to support or oppose a ballot proposition.

 Shall not use public facilities to make a statement at a press conference or responding to an inquiry in support or opposition to any ballot proposition.

General Considerations:
 Is the appointed official using staff time, a public vehicle, or other public resources?

 Has the appointed official made it clear that he or she is not speaking on behalf of the agency?

Persons: Management Staff or Their Designees

Permitted:
 May speak at community forums and clubs to present an objective and fair presentation of the facts on a ballot measure during regular work hours.

 May fully participate in campaign activities, including meeting with citizens’ campaign committees to plan strategies, during non-work hours and without the use of public resources.

 May fully participate in campaign activities, including meeting with citizens’ campaign committees to plan strategies, during non-work hours and without the use of public resources.

 May inform staff during non-work hours of opportunities to participate in campaign activities.

 May respond to questions regarding a ballot measure if such activity is consistent with his or her normal and regular duties.

 May wear campaign buttons or similar items while on the job if the agency’s policy generally permits employees to wear political buttons.

 May place window signs or bumper stickers on their privately‑owned cars, even if those cars are parked on government property during working hours.

 Are encouraged to communicate to staff the difference between acceptable and unacceptable activities related to a ballot measure.

 May encourage staff and members of the public to vote, as long as such encouragement routinely occurs for other elections.

Not Permitted:
 Shall not use public resources to operate a speakers’ bureau in a manner that may be viewed as promoting a ballot measure.

 Shall not use public resources to promote or defeat a candidate or ballot measure.

 Shall not pressure or coerce employees to participate in campaign activities.

 Shall not use agency resources to organize the distribution of campaign materials.

General Considerations:
 Is the management staff using public resources in a manner that promotes or opposes a candidate or a ballot measure?

 Does the presentation accurately present the costs and other anticipated impacts of a ballot measure?

 

 Does the agency have a policy permitting employees to wear political buttons?

 

Persons: Agency Employees

Permitted:
 May speak at community forums and clubs to present an objective and fair presentation of the facts on a ballot measure during regular work hours.

 May inform staff during non-work hours of opportunities to participate in campaign activities.

 May engage in campaign activities on their own time, during non-work hours and without using public resources.

 May respond to questions regarding a ballot measure if such activity is consistent with his or her normal and regular duties.

 May wear campaign buttons or similar items while on the job if the agency’s policy generally allows employees to wear political buttons.

 May, during non-work hours, make available campaign materials to employees in lunchrooms and break rooms that are used only by staff or other authorized individuals.

 May place window signs or bumper stickers on their cars, even if those cars are parked on government agency property during working hours.

 May encourage staff and members of the public to vote, as long as such encouragement routinely occurs for other elections.

Not Permitted:
 Shall not use work hours or public resources to promote or oppose a candidate or ballot measure (such as gathering signatures, distributing campaign materials, arranging speaking engagements, coordinating phone banks, or fundraising).

 Shall not pressure or coerce other employees to participate in campaign activities.

 Shall not use agency resources to organize the distribution of campaign materials.

General Considerations:
 Do the presentations accurately present the costs and other anticipated impacts of a ballot measure?

 Is the employee acting on his or her own time, during non-work hours?

 Is the employee using public resources in a matter that promotes or defeats a candidate or a ballot measure?

 Does the agency have a policy permitting employees to wear political buttons?

 

Persons: Union Representatives

Permitted:

 May, during non-work hours, make available campaign materials to union members in lunchrooms and break rooms that are used only by staff or other authorized individuals.

 May distribute campaign materials at union-sponsored meetings.

 May post campaign materials on a bulletin board, if such a board is in an area that is not accessible to the general public and if such activity is consistent with the agency’s policy and the collective bargaining agreements.

 Shall not distribute promotional materials in public areas.

Not Permitted:

 Shall not use the agency’s internal mail or email system to communicate campaign-related information, including endorsements.

 Are campaign materials made available only in those areas used solely by staff or other authorized individuals?

 Does such distribution occur during non-work hours?

 

Activities and Resources: Equipment and Supplies
Permitted:

 Agency employees, in the course of their employment, may use equipment (including but not limited to projectors and computers) to make an objective and fair presentation of the facts at community forums and clubs.

 Agency employees, in the course of their employment, may produce information that is an objective and fair presentation of the facts using public resources.

Not Permitted:

 Public resources (including but not limited to internal mail systems, email systems, copiers, telephone) shall not be used to support or oppose a candidate or ballot measure, whether during or outside of work hours.

 Citizens’ campaign committees and other community groups shall not use agency equipment (including but not limited to internal mail systems, projectors, computers, and copiers) to prepare materials for meetings regarding ballot measures.

General Considerations:

 Do the presentations fairly and objectively present the costs and other anticipated impacts of a ballot measure?

Activities and Resources: Meeting Facilities

Permitted:

 Agency meeting facilities, including audio visual equipment, may be used by campaign committees for activities on the same terms and conditions available to other community groups, subject to the provisions of the agency’s policy.

 Use of agency meeting facilities is permitted when the facility is merely a “neutral forum” where the activity is taking place, and the public agency in charge of the facility is not actively endorsing or supporting the activity that is occurring.

General Considerations:

 Can community groups typically use agency facilities?

 Are facilities made available to all groups on the same terms?

 Has the agency adopted a policy regarding the distribution of campaign materials on agency property?
Meeting Facilities

 Is the meeting facility customarily made available on an equal access, nondiscriminatory basis for a variety of uses?

Activities and Resources: Lists

Permitted:
 Lists of names (such as agency vendors or customers) that a agency has obtained or created in the course of transacting its regular public business are subject to public disclosure requirements; thus, unless otherwise exempt, the lists must be released subject to public records requests.

 Agencies may charge a pre‑established fee to cover the costs of providing copies of such lists on an equal access, nondiscriminatory basis.

Not Permitted:

 Agencies shall not sell copies of such lists (though they may charge a pre-established fee to recover the costs of providing copies of the lists).

 If a list is generally available as a public record, it cannot be denied to a person or group on the grounds that it might be used in a campaign.

General Considerations:

 Is the list obtained or created in the course of the agency transacting its public business?

 Are the fees charged no greater than necessary to cover the costs of providing copies?

 Has the agency complied with established policy in responding to any public record requests?

Activities and Resources: Voting Information

Permitted:

 Agency personnel may encourage staff and members of the public to vote, as long as such encouragement routinely occurs for other elections.

 Public facilities may be used to register people to vote and to do periodic poll checking.

Not Permitted:

 Agencies shall not pressure or coerce employees to vote.

 Agencies shall not organize an effort to encourage staff to wear campaign buttons or display campaign materials.

General Considerations:

 Is the activity related to providing voting information for elections, as opposed to advocating for or against a particular candidate or ballot measure?

Activities and Resources: Agency Publications (Specific to Elections)

Permitted:

 Agencies may develop an objective and fair presentation of the facts regarding agency needs and the anticipated impact of a ballot measure, and may distribute it in the agency’s customary manner. This information may be printed in various languages and communicated in other formats as required by the ADA.

 In the course of regular publications for the agency, the agency may distribute an objective and fair presentation of the facts for each ballot measure in accordance with the normal and regular conduct of the agency.

Not Permitted:

 Agencies shall not distribute election-related information in a manner that targets specific subgroups. Targeting does not refer to mailing information to agency constituencies such as community leaders, or some other group, or to the agency’s regular distribution list to provide information in a manner that is consistent with the normal and regular conduct of the agency.

 Agencies shall not publicize information supporting or opposing a candidate or ballot measure.

General Considerations:

 Does the information provide an objective and fair presentation of the facts?

 Is the timing, format, and style, including tone and tenor, of the information presented in a manner that is normal and regular for the agency?

 Is the information distributed in a manner that is normal and regular for the agency?

 Do the materials accurately present the costs and other anticipated impacts of a ballot measure?

 Does the agency typically distribute information by newsletters, websites, or some other format?

Activities and Resources: Agency Publications (Regular)

Permitted:

 Agencies may include all or part of the information regarding agency needs and the anticipated impacts of a ballot measure in the agency’s regular publications, such as agency and department newsletters. (For example, a department newsletter may specifically describe the projects and/or programs planned for that department.)

 Agencies may inform staff and/or parents of community meetings related to ballot measures if other such information is normally published in a newsletter or community calendar, and if both those supporting or opposing a ballot measure have the opportunity to appear on the calendar or in the newsletter.

 Agencies may factually report jurisdictional support for a ballot measure, so long as it is the normal and regular conduct for the agency. (For example, a community newsletter that ordinarily reports on governmental actions may report that the jurisdiction adopted a resolution supporting a ballot measure.)

 Agencies may thank citizens for their support after an election in agency publications.

Not Permitted:

 Agencies shall not use internal memoranda or other agency publications to encourage employees to participate in campaign activities.

 Agencies shall not publish materials supporting or opposing a candidate or ballot measure.

General Considerations:

 Does the agency routinely distribute such information?

 Does the agency normally inform staff and/or parents of community activities and meetings?

 Is the information presented in an objective and fair manner?

 Is the agency engaging in significantly different activities during the time period immediately prior to the ballot measure compared to all other times of the year?

Activities and Resources: Reader Boards/Posters

Permitted:

 Information encouraging staff and members of the public to vote, or providing the dates of upcoming elections such as “vote on February ___”, may be posted, as long as such encouragement is customarily posted for elections other than just an agency’s ballot measure.

 Agencies may thank citizens on their reader boards for their support after an election.

 May post objective and fair information at an agency or at a future site regarding anticipated improvements to be funded by a ballot measure that is specific to that agency or site.

Not Permitted:
 Agencies shall not display a “Vote for ….” sign or other promotional messages on reader boards or posters.

 Signs advocating for or against candidates or ballot measures shall not be posted on agency property in any area accessible to the general public.

 Publicly owned vehicles shall not be used to carry or display political material.

Activities and Resources: Surveys and Research

Permitted:

 Agencies may conduct surveys and/or other community research, including demographic questions, to determine the community’s priorities, public perception of performance, and/or to inform the community about agency programs and policies.

 Agencies may conduct community research (including but not limited to the use of questionnaires, surveys, workshops, focus groups, and forums) to determine the community’s priorities for both programs and/or facilities and their associated total costs and projected dollars per thousand assessment.

 The surveys and/or other community research can be conducted before or after the governing body has approved a resolution to place a ballot measure on the ballot. However, research conducted after the adoption of the resolution may be subject to greater scrutiny.

 Agencies may publish survey results if it is consistent with the normal and regular conduct of the agency.

Not Permitted:

 Agencies shall not conduct surveys to determine what taxation level the public would support.

 Agencies shall not conduct surveys designed to shore up support or opposition for a ballot measure.

 Agencies shall not target registered voters or other specific subgroups of the jurisdiction in conducting their election-related surveys.

 Agencies shall not use survey results in a manner designed to support or oppose a candidate or ballot measure.

General Considerations:

 Has the elected legislative body passed a resolution authorizing a measure to be placed on the ballot? (If so, actions may be more closely scrutinized.)

 Does the election-related survey target specific subgroups?

 Is the survey or community research consistent with normal and regular activities of the agency?

Activities and Resources: Technology (websites, emails, computerized calling systems)

Permitted:

 An agency may develop an objective and fair presentation of the facts and post that information on its website, including information regarding agency needs and the anticipated impacts of a ballot measure. This information may be reformatted so that it is consistent with the manner in which the agency customarily presents information on its website.

 Agency websites may permit viewers to make selections to learn about the anticipated impacts of a ballot measure for a specific division, or otherwise allow readers to explore issues in greater or lesser detail.

 Agencies may update the information on their websites in a manner that is customary for the agency.

 Staff may respond to inquiries regarding a ballot measure in an objective and fair manner, via email or by telephone, if it is part of their normal and regular duties.

Not Permitted:

 Agency computers, email systems, telephones, and other information technology systems shall not be used to aid a campaign for or against a candidate or ballot measure.

 Electronic communication systems shall not be used to generate or forward information that supports or opposes a candidate or ballot measure.

 Agency websites shall not be used for the purposes of supporting or opposing a candidate or ballot measure.

General Considerations:

 Are the materials developed an objective and fair presentation of the facts?

 Is the agency engaging in significantly different activities during the time period immediately prior to the ballot measure compared to all other times of the year?

 Do the materials accurately present the costs and other anticipated impacts of a ballot measure?

 Has there been communications with staff and with union representatives regarding the prohibition on the use of the agency’s technology to support or oppose a ballot measure?

Note on Timing of Activities: A particular activity may be subject to the scrutiny of the Public Disclosure Commission depending in part on whether it is a part of the “normal and ordinary” conduct of a local government agency. Generally, activities that occur after the elected legislative body has passed a resolution authorizing a measure to be placed on the ballot will be subject to greater scrutiny by the Public Disclosure Commission than those occurring before such a resolution has been passed.

Note on Agency Policies: The application of these guidelines is also subject to each jurisdiction’s own adopted policies.

Revised by the Commission 9/28/06

function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);} gtag('js', new Date()); gtag('config', 'UA-114403674-1');