6000 Series

6000—PROGRAM PLANNING, BUDGET PREPARATION, ADOPTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

A district’s annual budget is tangible evidence of the board’s commitment toward fulfilling the aims and objectives of the instructional program and providing for the efficient and effective operation of the district. The budget expresses in specific terms the services to be provided, consistent with immediate and long-range goals and resources available and establishes priorities within broad program areas such as basic education, other separately funded programs, and support services. Each year a budget will be prepared for the ensuing fiscal year. The budget will set forth the complete financial plan of the district for the ensuing fiscal year.

Prior to presentation of the proposed budget for adoption, the superintendent or designee will prepare for the board’s study and consideration appropriate documentation supporting his/her recommendations, which will be designed to meet the needs of students within the limits of anticipated revenues consistent with reasonable management practices. Program planning and budget development will provide for staff participation and the sharing of information with community members prior to action by the board.

Fiscal Year

The district fiscal year will begin September 1 each year and will continue through August 31 of the succeeding calendar year.

Budget Preparation, Notice, and Submission to ESD and OSPI

On or before the tenth day of July in each year, the district shall prepare the budget for the ensuing fiscal year. The annual budget development process shall include the development or update of a four-year budget plan that includes a four-year enrollment projection. The four-year budget plan must include an estimate of funding necessary to maintain the continuing costs of program and service levels and any existing supplemental contract obligations.

The completed budget must include a summary of the four-year budget plan and set forth the complete financial plan of the district for the ensuing fiscal year.

Upon completion of the budget, the district will electronically publish a notice stating that the district has completed the budget, posted it electronically, placed it on file in the district administration office, and that a copy of the budget and a summary of the four-year budget plan will be furnished to any person who calls upon the district for it.

By July 10th, the district will submit a copy of the budget and four-year budget plan to its educational service district and to the office of the superintendent of public instruction for review and comment, unless the superintendent of public instruction has delayed the date because the state operating budget was not adopted by June 1st.

Budget Notice, Hearing, Adoption, and Filing

The board of directors will meet to fix and adopt the budget for the ensuing fiscal year. The district will provide notice of the meeting. The notice will designate the date, time, and place of the meeting. The notice will also state that any person may appear at the meeting and be heard for or against any part of the budget, the four-year budget plan, or any proposed changes to uses of enrichment funding. The district will publish the notice electronically and will publish it at least once each week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the district (or if there is none in the district, in a newspaper of general circulation in the county or counties in which the district is a part). The last notice will be published no later than seven days before the meeting.

On the day given in the notice, the board of directors will meet at the time and place designated. At the meeting, the board of directors will fix and determine the appropriation from each fund contained in the budget separately; will by resolution adopt the budget, the four-year budget plan summary, and the four-year enrollment projection; and will record its action in the official minutes. Copies of the budget as adopted will be filed with the educational service district for review, alteration, and approval by the budget review committee. Copies of the budget will be filed with the superintendent of public instruction.

The dates for adoption and filing are as follows:

• Budget adopted by 8.1
• Budget forwarded to ESD for review, alteration, and approval by budget review committee by 8.3
• Budget review committee approves budget by 8.31
• Budget returned to school district and filed with OSPI by 9.10

Budget Implementation

The board places responsibility with the superintendent or designee for administering the operating budget, once adopted. All actions of the superintendent or designee in executing the programs and/or activities as set forth in the adopted operating budget are authorized subject to the following provisions:

A. Expenditure of funds for the employment and assignment of staff meet the legal requirements of the state of Washington and adopted board policies;

B. Funds held in reserve accounts (General fund #810-890) for self-insurance and other such contingencies may not be expended unless approved for purposes designated by the board;

C. Complete listing of expenditures for supplies, materials and services is presented for board approval and/or ratification;

D. Purchases are made according to the legal requirements of the state of Washington and adopted board policy;

E. Funds may be transferred from one budget classification to another subject to such restrictions as may be imposed by the board;

F. The superintendent or designee will be responsible for establishing procedures to authorize and control the payroll operations of the district. No involuntary deduction may be made from the wages of a staff member except for federal income tax, social security, medical aid, and state retirement, or in compliance with a court order such as garnishment; and

G. Financial reports are submitted to the board each month.

Cross References: 6213 – Reimbursement for Travel Expenses
5005 – Employment and Volunteers: Disclosures, Certification Requirements, Assurances and Approval

Legal References: RCW 28A.300.060 Studies and adoption of classifications for school district budgets — Publication
RCW 28A.320.010 Corporate powers
RCW 28A.320.020 Liability for debts and judgments
RCW 28A.320.090 Preparing and distributing information on district’s instructional program, operation and maintenance — Limitation
RCW 28A.330.100 Additional powers of the board
RCW 28A.400.300 Hiring and discharging employees — Written leave policies — Seniority and leave benefits of employees transferring between school districts and other educational employers.
RCW 28A.505.040 Budget — Four-year budget plan — Notice of completion — Copies — Review by Educational service districts
RCW 28A.505.050 Budget — Notice of meeting to adopt
RCW 28A.505.060 Budget — Hearing and adoption of — Copies filed with ESDs
RCW 28A.505.080 Budget — Disposition of copies
RCW 28A.505.150 Budgeted expenditures as appropriations — Interim expenditures — Transfer between budget classes — Liability for nonbudgeted expenditures
Chapter 28A.510 RCW Apportionment to District — District Accounting
WAC 392-123-054 Time schedule for budget

Management Resources: 2011 – October Issue

Adoption Date: 10/25/18
Revised Dates: 12.98; 02.06; 10.11; 08.18



6000P—PAYROLL: AUTHORIZATION AND CONTROL

Employment of all certificated and classified staff must be approved by the board and authority to pay for such services rendered follows this approval. Annual salaries shall be determined by placement on the district salary schedule in terms of position, experience and training (where applicable). Proper documentation is required to receive credit for experience and training.

Personnel Action

To initiate a personnel action, the supervisor shall initiate a personnel action notice. The notice shall be approved by:

A. Personnel department giving assurances that the contemplated action is consistent with all procedures related to the district’s employment practices;

B. Business department giving assurance that there are adequate funds covering the proposed action;

C. Superintendent giving final authority for the personnel action.

Salary Warrants

Unless otherwise indicated, each staff member shall receive a salary warrant on the last working day of each month equal to l/12 of the staff member’s yearly salary less statutory, contractual and voluntary deductions. Voluntary payroll deductions shall be authorized by the board. (See policy 5313 – Payroll Deductions.) The board may act on behalf of individual staff to deduct a certain amount from the staff member’s paycheck and remit an agreed amount to a designee of the staff member.

Present statutory deductions are as follows:

  • OASI Deducted during the calendar year from each pay warrant beginning with January 1 payroll until the required amount is deducted.
  • WITHHOLDING TAX Deducted according to the current Internal Revenue Service schedule.
  • MEDICAL AID Deducted from each pay warrant for all staff as set by the State Department of Labor and Industries.
  • RETIREMENT Washington State Public Employees’ Retirement System – Deducted from each pay warrant of non-certificated staff holding eligible positions at the rate set by the state.
  • Washington State Teachers’ Retirement System Deducted from each pay warrant of certificated full-time staff at the rate set by the state.
  • Present contractual deductions are as follows:
  • HEALTH INSURANCE Deducted from the pay warrant each month for (enter name(s) of medical insurance companies).
  • LIFE INSURANCE Deducted from the pay warrant each month.
  • ASSOCIATION/UNION DUES As negotiated in each agreement.
  • DENTAL INSURANCE Deducted from the pay warrant each month for eligible staff.
  • Present voluntary deductions, which are subject to District approval, are as follows:
  • SALARY INSURANCE Deducted from the pay warrant each month for (enter name(s) of salary insurance companies).
  • CREDIT UNION Deducted from the pay warrant each month for credit union.
  • AMERICAN RED CROSS Deducted monthly.
  • TAX-SHELTERED ANNUITIES Deducted for equal monthly installments following the employees’ submission of new or amended participation forms.
  • DEFERRED COMPENSATION Deducted for equal monthly installments following the employee’s submission of a request for payroll deduction on the Public Disclosure Commission Form.
  • POLICICAL CONTRIBUTIONS Deducted in equal monthly installments following the employee’s submission of a request for payroll deduction on the Public Disclosure Commission form.

Hourly or Daily Employment

Hourly or daily staff must submit time slips. Time slips must be signed by the staff member and approved by the staff member’s supervisor.

Leave

District leave provisions are covered in district policies. Upon return from a leave, the staff member shall complete a time slip and any related leave forms. The time slip must be approved by the staff member’s supervisor. The business office shall compile the amount of leave used on a monthly basis. Accrued leave shall be reported on the staff member’s warrant statement. Staff must submit time slips when they do not report to work regardless of the nature of the absence, whether illness, emergency leave, non-reimbursable leave or vacation.

Adoption Date: 10/22/02
Raymond School District #116



6005—TAX DEFERRED ACCOUNT/COMPENSATION

The Board of Directors may contract with an eligible employee to defer any portion of his/her compensation at an eligible employee’s direction. The district may provide for participation in a tax deferred account program, as defined by Section 403(b) and 403(b)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as amended.

Upon receipt of all documents required by the school district under the administrative procedure for tax deferred annuities and upon District approval, the Board will enter into a tax deferred account arrangement when eligible employees request an arrangement with a company of the employee’s choice.

Once approved, the superintendent, or his/her designee, will create a tax deferred account program at the request of said eligible employees. Procedures shall address:

Employee responsibilities for carrying out the tax deferred account program.
How and when employees can be contacted by representatives of the companies that comply with all of the requirements set forth in the administrative procedures.
The assurance that the school district shall be held harmless for any actions occurring after the authorized funds have been disbursed to the company designated by the employee.
The employee’s responsibility for determining that the disbursement does not exceed the limits set forth in applicable law.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.400.250 Tax deferred annuities

Adoption Date: 4/25/02
Raymond School District #116



6005P—TAX DEFERRED ACCOUNT/COMPENSATION

Eligible employees may elect to defer a portion of their salary or wages to pay for a tax-deferred account. Eligible employees may make their deferral arrangements with any district authorized insurance company or mutual fund (both hereinafter referred to as “Service Provider”). A Service Provider may be authorized if five or more eligible employees request the district to enter into a contract with an insurance company offering a tax deferred account contract and licensed to do business in the State of Washington or a mutual fund that provides custodial contracts for tax deferred account programs, and complies with all district policies and procedures. The following are procedures pertaining to staff participation, hold harmless agreements, and sales representation contacts:

The district will initiate salary reductions when five salary reduction agreement forms have been submitted for a Service Provider, and an authorized officer of the Service Provider has signed and submitted the district’s Hold Harmless and Indemnity Agreement and a Tax Sheltered Account Company Basic Information Form. Only the district’s specific Hold Harmless and Indemnity Agreement will be acceptable. Failure to execute the district’s Hold Harmless and Indemnity Agreement will be sufficient grounds for denial or dismissal of the Service Provider as an approved Service Provider. In the event that the district has employees participating in a plan with a Service Provider that will not sign a district Hold Harmless and Indemnity Agreement, the district will not allow additional employees to participate in the plan offered by the Service Provider until the Service Provider signs the district’s Hold Harmless and Indemnity Agreement and meets all of the requirements of this administrative procedure. It is the responsibility of the employees requesting approval of a Service Provider to provide the district with the documents required by this procedure.

An eligible district employee, or a Service Provider, Agent, Registered Representative, or Registered Investment Advisor may request a tax deferred Account authorization form (salary reduction agreement) from the district payroll office. Only the district’s salary reduction agreement will be accepted. No substitutions will be accepted. The salary reduction agreement must have at least the signature of the employee. Because of the complexities in determining the maximum contribution limits, the district strongly advises all employees to obtain a signature from the Service Provider or licensed and authorized agent of the company, Registered Representative, or Registered Investment Advisor soliciting or receiving contributions on behalf of the employee. The Agent, Registered Representative, or Registered Investment Advisor, must register with the district by completing a Representative Profile, providing a copy of his/her current Washington State Insurance license (if applicable) and submitting a Hold Harmless and Indemnity Agreement for Agents and Registered Representatives/Registered Investment Advisors.

The salary reduction agreement will remain in force until modified or cancelled by the employee or employment has terminated. Payroll reductions will not be made if there are insufficient earnings to make a complete reduction.

Service Providers, their agents, registered representatives and registered investment advisors must comply with all pertinent written directives regarding the solicitation of employees. Solicitation of employees conducted on school premises during scheduled work hours is not permitted. Presentations before and after normal school hours may be given only if approved by the building administrator. Tax deferred program literature may be disbursed via intraschool mail from the payroll office the first of each calendar quarter.

In the event that participation in a program offered by a Service Provider drops below 5 participants, the district will notify the Service Provider that participation must be at least five participants within a six month period or the Service Provider will be dropped from the district’s approved Service Provider list. Once a Service Provider has been dropped from the approved list, the Service Provider will be required to meet all the qualifications of a new Service Provider in order to add new participants. This procedure does not affect participants currently contributing to a plan with the Service Provider. Current participants will continue to have all rights and options provided under the plan.

An Employee contributing more than the Elective Deferral Limit of $11,000 (in 2002 indexed in subsequent years) must submit a Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet with each salary reduction agreement. The Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet must calculate the 415(c) General Limit and 402(g) Elective Deferral Limit.

In addition, a Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet must be submitted annually if the employee’s contribution for a calendar year is greater than $11,000 (or applicable limit). The required annual Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet must be submitted to the district by November 1 of the calendar year in which the above circumstances apply. In the event the Modified Maximum Amount Contributable Worksheet is not in the district office by the deadline for payroll changes in January of the following year, the district will stop contributions until the employee submits the Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet. The accuracy of the Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet must be certified by signature of the employee.

Because of the complexities in determining the maximum contribution limits, the district strongly advises all employees to obtain assistance in preparing the Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet. The district also strongly advises the employee to obtain the signature of the Service Provider or licensed and authorized agent of the company, Registered Representative, or Registered Investment Advisor calculating the Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet certifying the accuracy of the calculation for the employee. The district will assume no responsibility for verifying or certifying the accuracy of the Modified Maximum Amount Contributable worksheet.

Adoption Date: 4/25/02
Raymond School District #116



6010—FISCAL YEAR

The district fiscal year shall begin September l each year and shall continue through August 31 of the succeeding calendar year.

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.505.030 District fiscal year

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6020‑SYSTEM OF FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS

Funds

The district will maintain a system of funds with the county treasurer in accordance with state law and the accounting manual approved by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The funds are:

General Fund


The General Fund (GF) is financed primarily from local taxes, state support funds, federal grants, and local receipts. These revenues are used specifically for financing the ordinary and legally authorized operations of the district for all grades. The GF includes money which has been segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities including, but not limited to, the basic and special education programs. The GF is managed in accordance with special regulations, restrictions and limitations and constitutes an independent fiscal and accounting entity.

Capital Projects Fund


The Capital Projects Fund (CPF) contains:

  • proceeds from the sale of voted bonds (unlimited tax general obligation bonds) and non-voted bonds (limited general obligation bonds);
  • State of Washington financing assistance (state matching money);
  • transfers from the district’s basic education allotment;
  • the proceeds of special levies earmarked for building purposes;
  • earnings from capital projects fund investments
  • growth management impact fees;
  • state environmental protection act mitigation payments;
  • rental or lease proceeds; and
  • proceeds from the sale of property.

Permissible expenditures from the proceeds derived from the sale of voted bonds, including the investment earnings thereon, is governed expressly by state law and, may include the acquisition of land or existing buildings, improvements to buildings and/or grounds, design and construction and/or remodeling of buildings, or initial equipment; provided that, the bond election resolution and ballot proposition approved by the voters authorizing the bonds includes these items. The Washington Constitution prohibits the use of voted bond proceeds to replace equipment.

Proceeds from other sources are also governed by state law and may be used for major renovation and replacement including but not limited to roofing, heating and ventilating systems, floor covering and electrical systems; renovation of play fields and other district real property; energy audits, capital improvements and major items of equipment, furniture and implementing technology systems, facilities and projects, including acquiring hardware, licensing software and on-line applications that are an integral part of the district’s technology systems.

Any money from the sale of voted bonds and investment earnings thereon remaining after the authorized capital improvements have been completed may be used to: (a) acquire, construct, install, equip and make other capital improvements to the district’s facilities; or (b) retire and/or defease a portion of voted bonds, all as the school board may determine by resolution after holding a public hearing pursuant to RCW 28A.530.020.

Investment earnings derived from other sources in the CPF should be retained in the CPF and used for statutorily authorized purposes. The district may transfer investment earnings in the CPF, which have not been derived from voted bond proceeds, to a different fund; provided that, such investment earnings may only be expended for instructional supplies, equipment or capital outlay purposes. The superintendent should consult the board and appropriate district staff prior to altering the use of voted bond proceeds and transferring investment earnings out of the CPF.

Debt Service Fund


The Debt Service Fund (DSF) is for the payment of principal of and interest on outstanding voted and non-voted bonds. Disbursements are made by the county treasurer by means of treasurer’s checks. Provision will be made annually for the making of a levy sufficient to meet the annual payments of principal and semiannual payments of interest. The district may transfer surplus investment earnings from the DSF to any other school district fund; provided that, such investment earnings are spent only for instructional supplies, equipment or capital outlay purposes. The district may transfer such investment earnings to other school district funds unless the resolution authorizing the voted bonds requires investment earnings to remain in the DSF to secure payment of voted bonds, thereby reducing future tax collections and the corresponding tax levy rate. The superintendent should consult with the board and appropriate staff prior to transferring interest earnings out of the DSF.

Non-voted bonds are required to be repaid from the school district’s DSF, rather than the fund that actually received the non-voted bond proceeds. As a result, to pay principal of and interest on the non-voted bond, an operating transfer must be used from the CPF (or other fund) to the DSF. The school district should create a separate account within the DSF to repay the non-voted bond. The district should internally segregate the money pledged to repay the non-voted bond from any excess property taxes deposited in the DSF for the repayment of voted bonds.

Prior to the issuance of a non-voted bond the superintendent or a designee will review the repayment process with the board and the county treasurer. The proceeds from the sale of real property may be placed in the DSF or CPF, except for the amount required to be expended for the costs associated with the sale of such property.

Associated Student Body Program Fund

The board is responsible for the protection and control of student body financial resources just as it is for other public funds placed in its custody. The financial resources of the Associated Student Body Program Fund (ASB Fund) are for the benefit of students. Student involvement in the decision-making processes related to the use of this money is an integral part of the associated student body, except that the board may delegate the authority to a staff member to act as the associated student body for any school which contains no grade higher than grade six.

Money in the ASB Fund is public money and may not be used to support or oppose any political candidate or ballot measure. Money raised by students through recognized student body organizations will be deposited in and disbursed from the fund which is maintained by the county treasurer. The ASB Fund is subject to management and accounting procedures which are similar to those required for all other district moneys. ASB constitutions will provide for participation by ASB representatives in the decisions to budget for and disburse ASB Fund money. Private non-associated student body fund moneys raised for scholarships, student exchanges and charitable purposes will be held in trust by the district.

Transportation Vehicle Fund


The transportation vehicle fund (TVF) includes:

  • the proceeds from the sale of transportation vehicles;
  • lease, rental, or occasional use of surplus buses;
  • depreciation reimbursement for district-owned buses;
  • proceeds of TVF levies;
  • optional transfers from the GF;
  • and investment funds coming from the TVF.

The TVF may be used to purchase and/or rebuild buses on a contract or cash basis. Money may be transferred from the TVF to the DSF exclusively for the payment of principal of and interest on non-voted debt incurred by the TVF. Such a transfer does not constitute a transfer of money from the TVF within the meaning of RCW 28A.160.130.

Skill Center Minor Repair and Maintenance Capital Account

A host district of a cooperative skill center must maintain a separate minor repair and maintenance capital account for facilities constructed or renovated with state funding. Participating districts must make annual deposits into the account to pay for future minor repair and maintenance costs of those facilities. The host district has authority to collect those deposits by charging participating districts an annual per-pupil facility fee.

Bank Accounts

The district will maintain a system of bank accounts as follows:

  • A district depository and/or transmittal bank account;
  • An associated student body imprest bank account for each school having an associated student body organization approved by the board; and
  • Petty cash accounts in such numbers as are necessary to meet the petty cash needs of the schools and divisions of the district.

The board may authorize the establishment of such accounts. Each petty cash account will be approved by the board. A custodian will be appointed for these accounts who will be independent of invoice processing, check signing, general accounting and cash receipts functions. If this separation of functions is not feasible, another employee who is independent of those functions will be responsible for reviewing the management of each account.

Cross References:
6030 – Financial Reports
3510 – Associated Student Bodies

Legal References:
Wash. Const., Article VII, 2 Voted bond proceeds and capital levy proceeds — Uses
RCW 28A.320.320 Investment of funds of district—Service fee
RCW 28A.320.330 School funds enumerated — Deposits — Uses
RCW 28A.325.010 Fees for optional noncredit extracurricular events — Disposition
RCW 28A.325.020 Associated student bodies — Powers and responsibilities affecting
RCW 28A.325.030 Associated student body program fund — Fund raising activities — Nonassociated student body program fund moneys
RCW 28A.335.060 Surplus school property — Rental, lease, or use of — Disposition of moneys received from
RCW 28A.505.140 Rules for budgetary procedures —Review by superintendent — Notice of irregularity — Budget revisions
RCW 28A.530.010 Directors may borrow money, issue bonds
RCW 28A.530.020 Bond issuance — Election — Resolution to specify purposes
RCW 28A.530.080 Additional authority to contract indebtedness–Notice
RCW 42.17A.555 Use of public office or agency facilities in campaigns — Prohibition — Exceptions
RCW 43.09.200 Local government accounting — Uniform system of accounting
RCW 43.09.210 Local government accounting — Separate accounts for each fund or activity — Exemption for agency surplus personal property
RCW 84.52.053 Levies by school districts authorized — When — Procedure
RCW 84.52.056 Excess levies for capital purposes authorized
WAC 392-123 Finance — School District Budgeting
WAC 392-138 Finance — Associated Student Body Moneys
State Auditor Bulletin #301, III(E), Petty Cash, (PT 3, Ch 3, Pg 8)
SSB 5644 Cooperative Skill Centers—Facility Maintenance—Accounting

Management Resources:
2017 – July Issue

Adoption Date: 11/21/17
Raymond School District #116



6020P—SYSTEM OF FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS

The following guidelines shall be used in managing bank accounts:

A. The amount of the imprest fund of a school shall be based on the highest amount of funds expended in one month. The amount shall be approved by the board of directors.

B. The board of directors shall appoint a staff member to serve as custodian of the fund. A surety bond shall be secured in the amount of the fund.

C. Use of imprest funds and/or petty cash shall be restricted to those obligations which cannot be handled by voucher.

D. Imprest funds and/or petty cash may not be used to circumvent any laws related to purchasing.

E. All receipts which are submitted for reimbursement shall be dated and signed by the submitter.

F. Imprest accounts shall be replenished at least monthly by warrant of check payable to the custodian. The replenishment must be made by voucher with appropriate receipts attached.

G. Whenever an individual’s appointment as custodian is terminated the imprest fund must be replenished and turned over to the fiscal officer.

H. Local audits of each imprest account by someone other than the custodian of the account shall be made on a surprise and unscheduled basis at least twice per year.

Associated Student Body Fund Procedures

The following guidelines shall be in effect in the operation of the respective associated student bodies:

I. The principal shall appoint the primary advisor to the ASB. He/she shall be responsible for designating advisors to the various student subgroup organizations affiliated with the ASB. For schools with no grade higher than grade six, the board may delegate the authority to a staff member to act as the associated student body.

J. The principal shall be responsible for supervising the accounting functions to be performed at the building level. The building-level accounting procedures shall be consistent with the accounting functions performed at the district office level.

K. At the beginning of each year, the ASB shall submit a report which describes in summary those activities which constitute ASB programs.

L. The ASB shall participate in the determination of the purposes for which ASB financial resources shall be budgeted and disbursed. Such purposes shall be reflected in the ASB budget which is submitted to the board of directors for its approval.

M. The ASB shall approve all expenditures before money shall be disbursed from the fund. In the event that an associated student body group conducts fund raising or solicits donations for scholarships, student exchanges and charitable purposes, the associated student body group shall approve all expenditures of money so raised.

N. ASB funds may be used for purposes consistent with school district policy and approved by the governing body of the organization and subject to the provisions incorporated into the student body constitution and bylaws. Private non-associated student body fund money held by the district which is used for scholarships, charitable contributions, and student exchange program, is limited to funds denoted for that specific purpose, that have been so identified at the time of their collection, and that have been held in trust exclusively for donative purpose. Such funds must be contributed and raised on a voluntary basis. No ASB funds may be contributed to the support or opposition of a political candidate or ballot measure.

O. Fund-raising activities not associated with an ASB-sponsored organization, are not permitted by law to be done under the direction or supervision of staff nor with the use of district equipment, supplies, facilities or other district resources unless the district is fully reimbursed for all such costs.

P. The principal shall have the authority to arrange for non-ASB funds to be held in trust in separate accounts in the fund so long as students are informed in advance that a charge shall be made to cover the full cost of the service.

Q. For schools with students in grade seven or above, evidence of student approval must appear on all vouchers supporting a disbursement of ASB money. This includes purchase orders and imprest fund check requests.

R. ASB moneys must be on deposit with the county treasurer with the exception of an imprest banking account and petty cash. Such funds shall be administered in the manner required by the regulations of the state board of education.

Management Of District Bank Accounts

Moneys received for the district shall be handled as follows:

  • Receipts shall be given for all moneys;
  • All moneys received by the district, except those received by the county treasurer on behalf of the district, shall be deposited in the district’s transmittal account.
  • Provisions shall be made for individual buildings to have access to night depository. In no cases shall money remain in a building for more than 24 hours;

A. Receipts from special events shall be deposited intact;

B. All moneys in the transmittal account shall be transmitted to the county treasurer no later than the first of each month. Such transmittals shall be accompanied by a report indicating the sums to be credited to each of the district’s funds;

C. An accurate record shall be kept of all expenditures from each imprest account. Reimbursement to the maximum permitted shall be made to each imprest account by voucher each month; and

D. Local audits of each imprest account shall be made on a surprise and unscheduled basis at least twice per year. In addition, whenever there is a change of administrator, the imprest accounts which he/she administered shall be audited by the district.

Adoption Date: 06/26/01
Raymond School District # 116



6021 – INTERFUND LOANS

Inter-fund loans between the general fund, the transportation vehicle fund, the capital projects fund, or the debt service fund may be used to alleviate a temporary cash deficiency.

Such loans shall not be used to balance the budget of the borrowing fund; nor shall they deter any function or project for which the fund was established.

The board must adopt a resolution before any inter-fund loan transaction takes place. The resolution shall contain the exact amount of the loan, the funds involved, the specific source of funds for repayment, the schedule for repayment and the interest rate involved.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.505.150 Budgeted expenditures as appropriations—Interim expenditures–Transfer between budget classes–Liability for non-budgeted expenditures
WAC 392-123-135 Inter-fund loans through 160

Adoption Date: 8/22/00
Raymond School District #116



6030—FINANCIAL REPORTS

Monthly Report

The business office shall prepare a monthly budget status report of the following funds:

A. General fund,

B. Capital projects fund,

C. Debt service fund,

D. Associated student body fund, and

F. Transportation vehicle fund.

A “statement of financial condition” shall be submitted to the board each month. The superintendent shall reconcile ending net cash and investments, revenues and expenditures reported by the county treasurer with the district records for all funds. As part of the budget status report, the superintendent shall provide each director with a brief written explanation of any significant deviation in revenue and/or expenditure projections that may affect the financial status of the district.

Annual Financial and Statistical Report

At the close of each fiscal year, the superintendent, as board secretary, shall submit to the board an annual financial statistical report. The report shall include at least a summary of financial operations for the year.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.230 Basic Education Act of 1977–District school directors as accountable for proper operation of district–Scope—Responsibilities
RCW 28A.400.030(3) Superintendent’s duties
WAC 392-123-110 Monthly financial statements and reports prepared by school district administrator
WAC 392-123-115 Monthly budget status report for general fund operations
WAC 392-123-120 Statement of financial condition–Financial position of the school district
WAC 392-123-125 Personnel budget status report
WAC 392-123-132 Reconciliation of monthly county treasurers’ statement to district records

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6040—EXPENDITURES IN EXCESS OF BUDGET

Total budget expenditures for each fund as adopted in the budget shall constitute the appropriations of the district for the ensuing fiscal year. The board shall be limited in the incurring of expenditures to the grand total of such appropriations.

Board members, administrators or staff who knowingly or negligently violate or participate in a violation of this policy by incurring expenditures in excess of appropriations shall be held civilly liable, jointly and severally, for such expenditures, including consequential damages, for each such violation. If as a result of any civil or criminal action the violation is found to have been done knowingly, such board member, administrator or staff member who is found to have participated in such breach shall immediately forfeit his/her office or employment.

In the event of an emergency requiring expenditures in excess of the budget, the board may adopt a resolution which states the conditions constituting the emergency and the amount of the appropriation necessary to correct the situation. At any other time that the budget is to be increased by making an additional appropriation, the board, after proper notice, shall adopt a resolution stating the facts and the amount of appropriation necessary to correct the situation. Any person may appear at the meeting at which the appropriation resolution is to be voted on and may be heard for or against the adoption. Passage of the resolution requires a majority vote of all members of the board.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.225.250 Cooperative programs among school districts – Rules
RCW 28A.505.150 Budgeted expenditures as appropriations–Interim expenditures–Transfer between budget classes–Liability for non-budgeted expenditures
RCW 28A.505.170 First class school districts–Emergency or additional appropriation resolutions–Procedure

Adoption Date: 3/23/06
Raymond School District #116



6100‑REVENUES FROM LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL SOURCES

Revenues from Discretionary Local Taxes
As necessary, the district will consider the necessity of requesting voter approval of an excess property tax to be collected in the year following voter approval. Such a levy, if any, will be in that amount permitted by law, which the board determines necessary to provide educational services beyond those provided by state appropriations. The board will solicit advice from staff and community members prior to establishing the amount and purposes of the special levy request. The special levy being collected will be presented by program and expenditure in the district’s annual descriptive guide for community members as required by law. In addition, districts must report their planned usage of levy proceeds to OSPI prior to the levy going to ballot as required by law.

Revenues from State Resources
The responsibility for financing public education in Washington falls primarily upon the state. To provide educational services beyond the levels possible under the basic education allocation, the district must depend upon state and federal special purpose funding programs and grants or excess property tax levies approved by district voters.

The state provides special purpose appropriations for programs of transportation, for children with disabilities and for such other programs as it deems appropriate to assist schools.

When the superintendent or designee identifies an optional state grant where in the superintendent’s or designee’s reasonable professional judgment the benefits and advantages from accepting the grant outweigh the costs – the board will receive a report and may formally authorize participation.

Revenues from the Federal Government
The objective of the board is to provide the best educational services possible within resources available to the district. Federal grants and programs may provide helpful financial resources towards pursuing that objective. When it is optional for the district to participate in a federally funded program, the board will receive detailed analysis from the staff regarding both the advantages to be realized from the program and the additional costs in terms of staff time, impact on existing programs, and new obligations that the program may require. Before authorizing participation in such a program, the board will first determine that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages and that the program will not detract from other programs already in operation.

The board agrees to comply with all applicable federal and state requirements that may be a condition to receipt of federal funds including, but not limited to:

1. Maintenance of fiscal records that show the receipt and disposition of federal funds;

2. Provision for eligible private school students to participate in programs and/or services designed for the educationally disadvantaged as well as other programs that are supported by federal funds;

3. Provision for testing to identify target students as well as to measure program results; and

4. Provision for staff and parent involvement, program planning, budget development, and program evaluation.

The district agrees to comply with Title 1 requirements pertaining to the implementation of internal controls for travel, contracted services, training, and capital outlay purchases and expenditures. The following controls are established for the Title I program:

1. All Title I funded purchases and expenditures will be directly related to allowable Title I activities and services that are necessary to carry out the objectives of the current program effectively, and for the benefit of eligible participants;
2. Title I purchases and expenditures will be restricted to those incurred by persons with direct Title I duties and responsibilities and/or that benefit only eligible Title I participants;
3. Title I funded in-service trainings will be directly related to specific Title I program activities and provided only to persons with Title I program responsibilities and duties; and
4. Appropriate documentation of all Title I purchases and expenditures incurred will be maintained for accountability and audit purposes.

The district further assures that a district-wide salary schedule is in effect and that the staff are assigned equitably among schools. Instructional material will also be distributed equitably among all schools. The board grants authority to directors and staff to participate in the development of any state and/or federal regulations deemed to be necessary for the implementation of federally-funded programs.

Federal Impact Funds (Indian)
Federal impact funds are provided to the district as a supplement to taxes and other revenue sources. State appropriated funds and local taxes contribute to the development and implementation of a basic education program for all students enrolled in the district. The district gives assurance that tribes and parents of Indian children will be afforded the opportunity to make recommendations regarding the needs of their children and will be involved in the planning and development of the basic education program including those educational programs and services to be provided with federal impact funds. Indian students will have the equal opportunity to participate in the district’s program with other students.

Recognizing that the board is the ultimate authority in defining the educational program of the district, the superintendent or designee will establish procedures to assure the involvement of the tribes and parents of Indian students in the development of the basic education program, including the education services to be provided with federal impact funds and the participation of Indian children in the program on an equal basis. The superintendent or designee will provide opportunities for parents and members of the tribal council to suggest if any policy and/or procedure changes as well as program changes are necessary to better serve the needs of the Indian students.

Legal References: RCW 28A.150.230 District school directors’ responsibilities
RCW 28A.150.250 Annual basic education allocation — Full funding — Withholding of funds for noncompliance
RCW 28A.300.070 Receipt of federal funds for school purposes — Superintendent of public instruction to administer
RCW 84.52.0531 Levies by school districts — Maximum dollar amount for maintenance and operation support — Restrictions — Maximum levy percentage — Levy reduction funds — Rules.
Chapter 180-16 WAC State Support of Public Schools
Public Law 81-874 Impact Aid
20 U.S.C. § 7701, et seq. Impact Aid
34 C.F.R. § 222.90, et seq. General
34 C.F.R. § 222.94, et seq. Indian Policies and Procedures

Management Resources:

2018 – June Alert
2017 – July Issue

Adoption Date: 10/25/18
Revised Dates: 02.06; 12.11; 07.17; 06.18



6100P—FEDERAL GOVERNMENT REVENUES

Internal Controls — Title 1

The following controls are established for the Title 1 program:

  • All Title 1 funded purchases and expenditures shall be directly related to allowable Title 1 activities and services that are necessary to effectively carry out the objectives of the current program, and for the benefit of eligible participants.
  • Title 1 purchases and expenditures shall be restricted to those incurred by persons with direct Title1 duties and responsibilities and/or which benefit only eligible Title 1 participants.
  • Title 1 funded inservice training shall be directly related to specific Title 1 program activities and provided only to persons with Title 1 program responsibilities and duties.
  • Appropriate documentation of all Title 1 purchases and expenditures incurred shall be maintained for accountability and audit purposes.

Parent Involvement — Title 1

Each school offering Title 1 programs shall comply with federal and state requirements by providing for:

  • Written parent notification of the selection of students for services;
  • Accessibility to parents of specific instructional objectives for their children;
  • Periodic student progress reports to parents;
  • Accessibility of support materials to be utilized in the home when requested by parents;
  • Parent participation in the instructional program on a volunteer basis; and
  • Parent input and recommendations in program planning and modification.

Federal Impact Funds (Indian)

The district shall disseminate material related to the P.L. 81-874 application, program evaluations and program plans and/or changes to parents of Indian children and tribal officials no later than eight weeks before the application is submitted. The district will seek input from tribal officials and the parents of Indian children regarding:

  • the participation of Indian children in the district’s education program on an equal basis;
  • their views regarding the P.L. 81-874 application, program evaluation and program plans; and their
  • recommendations regarding the needs of Indian children, the ways tribal leaders and parents can
  • assist their children to achieve the benefits of P.L. 81-874 programs, and the overall education
  • program and parental participation allowed.

At the board meeting immediately preceding the submission of the P.L. 81-874 application, the board will review the application and input provided by tribal officials and the parents of Indian children. Notice of the meeting location, time and topics related to the district’s P.L. 81-874 application shall be printed in the local newspaper.

The district shall form a parent-teacher task force to involve tribal officials and parents of Indian children in the planning and development of education programs assisted with the district’s P.L. 81-874 funds. The task force shall also assess the efficacy of the district’s efforts to obtain meaningful input from tribal officials and parents of Indian children, and the responsiveness of the district in modifying its policies and procedures following input. The task force shall report its findings and recommendations to the board at a public hearing at least once per year.

Following a conclusion by the board that such an action is necessary, the district shall form an ad hoc task force to recommend to the board a modified educational program to ensure the equal participation of Indian children. The task force shall report its recommendations to the board in a public hearing.

The district shall also conduct planning and information sessions during the year. All parents of Indian students and representatives of the tribal council shall be invited to attend these meetings. At these sessions, the district may:

A. Review the annual descriptive guide of the district;

B. Explain how Indian students gain access to and are served by the district’s education programs, and how educational programs are modified to ensure equal opportunity and participation by Indian students;

C. Review the identified needs of the district with particular attention directed towards assessing the needs of Indian students; and

D. Discuss proposed programs and services, as recommended by the task force, which are being considered to satisfy the stated needs and the extent to which Indian students are expected to be served.

Parents of Indian students and members of the tribal council will be advised of the Federal Impact Funds policy and procedure. Expressions of concerns and/or suggestions regarding the policies/procedures of the district are welcome. Any parent of Indian students or a member of the council may file a complaint regarding the application of P.L. 81-874 funds with the district. Said complaint should be submitted in writing to the superintendent of schools. Any complaint not satisfactorily resolved may be submitted in writing to the board of directors of the district. The board may elect to respond in writing to the complaint or hold an informal hearing with the complainant(s). A decision will be rendered within twenty (20) working days following submittal of the complaint to the board.



6101‑FEDERAL CASH AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The district’s financial management system and records will be sufficient for preparing required reports and for tracing expenditures to a level that establishes funds have been used according to federal statutes, regulations, and the terms and conditions of the federal award. This is in addition to maintaining a system of funds and accounts in accordance with state law and the accounting manual (Policy 6020).

The district’s financial management system will:

  • Identify all federal awards received and expended, including specific information pertaining to the award: federal program name; CFDA title and number; identification number and year; and name of federal and any pass-through agency.
  • Provide for accurate, current, and complete disclosure of the results of each federal award in accordance with reporting requirements.
  • Include records and supporting documentation that identify the source and application of funds for federally funded activities, including authorizations, obligations, unobligated balances, expenditures, assets, income and interest.
  • Enable the district to maintain effective internal controls to ensure accountability and proper safeguarding and use of all funds, property and other assets (for example, adequate segregation of duties).
  • Provide a comparison of expenditures with budget amounts for each federal award.

In order for the district to comply with federal regulations for grant recipients, the superintendent will implement written procedures for 1) cash management; and 2) determining the allowability of costs in accordance with Cost Principles and the federal award terms and conditions.

Cross References:
6020 – System of Funds and Accounts
6100 – Revenues from Local, State and Federal Sources

Legal References:

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 200 Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements, Sections§200.302 and §200.305

Management Resources:
Cash Management Improvement Act of 1990
2015 – October Issue

Adoption Date: 11/24/15
Raymond School District #116



6101P‑PROCEDURE FEDERAL CASH AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The district may draw federal funds using a reimbursement or advance payment method.

Reimbursement Payment Method

For reimbursements of federal funds, the district will:

  • Monitor the fiscal activity (payments and reimbursements) under each grant on a continuous basis, and request timely reimbursement only for expenditures that have already been disbursed and comply with all applicable award requirements.
  • Maintain source documentation/accounting records that reconcile to the reimbursement request at a level adequate to establish that funds have not been used in violation of any applicable statutory restrictions or prohibitions.
  • If the district transfers expenditures previously charged to a federal award for which reimbursement has been claimed to a non-federal fund source, the district will calculate the interest earned on the federal funds pursuant to possible submittal – refer to Interest Earned section below.

Advance Payment Method

For advances of federal funds, the district will:

  • Monitor the fiscal activity (drawdowns and payments) under each grant on a continuous basis and maintain source documentation/accounting records at a level adequate to establish that funds have not been used in violation of any applicable statutory restrictions or prohibitions.
  • To the extent available, disburse funds available from program income, rebates, refunds, contract settlements, audit recoveries, and interest earned on such funds before requesting additional cash payments.
  • Plan for cash flow in the grant project during the budget period and review project cash requirements before each drawdown.
  • Draw down only the amount of funds necessary to meet the immediate needs of the program/project (including the proportionate share of any allowable indirect costs), and minimize the time between receiving and disbursing those funds.
  • Pay out federal funds for expenditures that comply with all applicable grant requirements as soon as administratively feasible (a rule of thumb is no more than three business days after receiving the funds).
  • Deposit advance payments into insured accounts whenever possible. Unless conditions listed in CFR Title 2 Part 200 Subpart D §200.305(b)(8) apply, the district will maintain advance payments in interest-bearing accounts.
  • Remit interest earned over $500 annually – refer to Interest Earned section below.

Interest Earned

The district will retain interest earned amounts up to $500 per year for administrative expenses.

Any additional interest earned on those funds will be remitted annually to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Payment Management System (PMS) through an electronic medium or by check to the HHS Program Support Center. The district will refer to the federal or pass-through agency for pertinent information about the remittance.

Management Resources:
2015 – October Issue

Adoption Date: 11/24/15
Raymond School District #116



6102‑DISTRICT FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES

The district recognizes that it needs a balance of state, federal, local, and nongovernmental funds to achieve its goals. The district further recognizes that dwindling state and federal funds present challenges for the district. Increasingly, the district is seeking local and nongovernmental funding sources in order to preserve, establish and enhance important district programs and educational opportunities. The district’s ability to offer diverse, quality educational programs and experiences for our students depends in part on our ability to secure reliable alternative sources of funding.

To preserve and to establish district programs and educational opportunities the board authorizes fundraising activities where such programs: (1) Promote K-12 education; (2) Provide educational experiences for students, and/or (3) Address local funding obligations that support the educational mission of the district; (4) and/or promote the effective, efficient, or safe management and operation of the district.

District fundraising activities may include: (1) Soliciting gifts and donations that are reasonably related to the pursuit of the district’s objectives; (2) Entering into interlocal agreements with other governments which generate additional funds for school district activities; and/or (3) Operating various revenue generating enterprises consisting of the sale of goods or services that are produced by, or that are linked to, the district’s educational program. Fundraising programs, including enterprise activities, will be in the best interests of the district and will not interfere with the operation of the district’s programs and functions. District fundraising programs will not conflict with any applicable law and or state or federal constitutional provisions, including the separation of church and state.

This policy governs the establishment and administration of district fundraising for the general fund and for particular programs in the district. It does not address fundraising programs conducted by Parent Teacher Organizations, other non-profit or citizens’ organizations, or the Associated Student Body. Fundraising by the Associated Student Body is addressed by RCW 28A. 325.030 and Policy 3510.

The superintendent will establish procedures for the administration of district fundraising programs to ensure compliance with all applicable laws.

Cross References: 3530 – Fundraising Activities Involving Students
3510 – Associated Student Bodies

Legal References: RCW 28A.320.015 School Boards of Directors – Powers –Notice of adoption of policy
RCW 28A.320.030 Gifts, conveyances, etc., for scholarship and student aid purposes, receipt and administration
AGO 2003 No. 1 Attorney General’s Opinion

Management Resources: Policy News, December 2003 District Fundraising Activities

Adoption Date: 4/26/2018
Raymond School District #116



6102P‑DISTRICT FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES

The district fundraising programs for students will: (1) promote K-12 education; (2) provide educational experiences; and/or (3) address local funding obligations that support the educational mission of the district; (4) and/or promote the effective, efficient, or safe management and operation of the district.

District fundraising activities may include: (1) soliciting gifts and donations that are reasonably related to the pursuit of the district’s objectives; (2) entering into interlocal agreements with other governments which generate additional funds for school district activities; and/or (3) operating various revenue generating enterprises consisting of the sale of goods or services that are produced by, or that are linked to, the district’s educational program. The purpose or use of such programs will be consistent with the policies and programs of the district.

Note: Those who simply wish to sell items to increase “school spirit” and do not make a profit on such items, are not considered to be raising funds. In order to avoid possible confusion, the district requests that anyone engaged in such activity coordinate with the ASB and place the following statement on any promotional materials: “This activity is a private endeavor and is not associated with the Raymond School District.”

Proposals for district fundraising programs will be reviewed and approved in advance by the superintendent (or designee) to ensure compliance with the following procedures. The superintendent (or designee) will make all compliance determinations.

Any fundraising program charging fees will satisfy the following criteria:

1. Fees for persons attending or participating in such programs will only be charged when attendance or participation is optional, not mandatory;

2. Students will not be charged a fee to enroll in a curriculum-based activity that involves a district fundraising program; and

3. A program will not be created or continued that will require the allocation of district funds when program-specific resources are insufficient or exhausted.

Any fundraising program characterized as a “business enterprise” activity will satisfy the following criteria:

1. For these purposes, “business enterprise” will be defined as any non-Associated Student Body activity that sells goods or services for district-related purposes on an ongoing basis;

2. Such “business enterprises” will sell products or services that are appropriate for the program’s education purposes and/or promote the effective, efficient, or safe management and operation of the district;

3. Such enterprises will not be created solely for commercial purposes;

4. Such enterprises will purchase inventory in accordance with applicable district policy and/or practices; and

5. A business enterprise program will not be created or continued that will require the allocation of district funds when program-specific resources are insufficient or exhausted.

Any fundraising program using donated personal items or services for an auction, sale, and/or raffle will satisfy the following criteria:

1. Donated items or services must be free from health and/or safety hazards;

2. Donated items or services must be given voluntarily by individuals or businesses; and

3. Appropriate solicitation on the part of students, parents or appropriate district personnel is permissible, but actions of students and parents cannot bind the district to any contractual obligations.

Any fundraising program that requires contracting with a third-party vendor or promoter will satisfy the following criteria:

1. The contract will further K-12 education and/or promote the effective, efficient, or safe management and operation of the district; and

2. The district will enter into contracts consistent with district policies and with appropriate authorization of the superintendent (or designee).

3. The Athletic Director will establish a single online “spirit apparel” vendor as the district’s official online presence for such items. Any employees who wish to offer such items will use this vendor.

Any fundraising program involving the production and/or sale of goods or services, such as a vocational education program, will satisfy the following criteria:

1. The superintendent (or designee) must authorize the sales of any goods produced and/or any services provided by the education program;

2. The proceeds from the sale will be used to enhance or to expand the education programs(s), as determined by the superintendent (or designee);

3. To the extent required, all goods produced or services provided from an educational program will be assigned to or owned by the district; and

4. Individual compensation for the sale of goods produced and/or for the services provided will not be permitted, except as authorized by the superintendent, in accordance with applicable laws, district procedures, and/or practice.

Online fundraising sites (Donors Choose, GoFundMe, Kickstarter, etc.) are permissible to use to solicit non-cash donations or supplies, materials or equipment under the following conditions:

1. Prior written permission is received from the superintendent before posting the request;

2. All items are shipped directly to the school site or district office;

3. Supplies, materials or equipment are consistent with district standards;

4. Supplies, materials or equipment become the property of the district; and

5. Fixed assets are added to the site’s inventory lists.

Any fundraising program selling surplus school personal property will satisfy the following criteria:

1. Such programs will not violate applicable state law or school policy governing the sale, lease, or rental of surplus and obsolete school personal property;

2. Such programs are permitted only as provided in RCW 28A.335.180; and

3. Such programs follow the district’s policy for the disposal of surplus property, District Board Policy No 6881.



6106‑ALLOWABLE COSTS FOR FEDERAL PROGRAMS

Expenditures under federal programs are governed by the Federal Cost Principles contained in 2 CFR Part 200 Subpart E – Cost Principles. The district is committed to ensuring that costs claimed under Federal awards follow these cost principles as well as any special terms and conditions contained in the award. Additionally, as a grantee, the district is required to follow the more restrictive of the federal, state, and district policies.

When applying these cost principles, the district will:

  • Maintain responsibility for the efficient and effective administration of the Federal award through the application of sound management practices;
  • Assume responsibility for administering federal funds in a manner consistent with underlying agreements, program objectives and the terms and conditions of the federal award; and
  • Apply accounting practices that are consistent with the cost principles, support the accumulation of costs as required by the principles, and provide for adequate documentation to support costs charged to the federal award.

The district will maintain a system of internal controls over federal expenditures to provide reasonable assurance that Federal awards are expended only for allowable activities and that the costs of goods and services charged to Federal awards are allowable and in accordance with the above referenced cost principles. Those controls will meet the following general criteria:

  • Be necessary and reasonable for the performance of the Federal award and be allocable thereto under these principles;
  • Conform to any limitations or exclusions set forth in these principles or in the Federal award as to types or amount of cost items;
  • Be consistent with policies and procedures that apply uniformly to both federally-financed and other activities of the district;
  • Be accorded consistent treatment;
  • Be determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
  • Not be included as a cost or used to meet cost sharing or matching requirements of any other federally-financed program in either the current or a prior period; and
  • Be adequately documented.

Cross References:
1610 – Conflicts of Interest
6101 – Federal Cash and Financial Management
6210 – Purchasing: Authorization and Control
6220 – Bid Requirements
6801 – Capital Assets/Theft-Sensitive Assets

Legal References:
2 CFR Part 200, Subpart E

Management Resources:
2015 – December Issue

Adoption Date: 3/24/2016
Raymond School District #116



6106P‑PROCEDURE ALLOWABLE COSTS FOR FEDERAL PROGRAMS

The purpose of this procedure is to ensure federal funds are spent only on allowable activities in accordance with CFR Part 200 Subpart E – Cost Principles, other special terms or conditions of the grant award, and/or other applicable state and federal guidelines. In determining allowable costs, the district will use the guiding principles as established in the Allowable Costs Policy 6106.

Two categories of costs may be charged to a Federal award. The first are direct costs, which are costs that directly benefit the activity and are easy to identify. The second are indirect costs, which are costs that either benefit the activity in an indirect manner or directly benefit the activity but the complexity of adequately identifying the costs as such outweighs the benefit of charging them directly.

Costs will meet the requirements of necessary and reasonable when they do not exceed those which would be incurred by a prudent person under the circumstances at the time the decision was made to incur the cost. District employees will use the following questions to determine reasonable and necessary costs:

  • Does the district really need this item/service?
  • Is the expense targeted to a valid programmatic/administrative need?
  • Is this the minimum amount we need to spend to meet our needs?
  • Do we have the capacity to use what we are purchasing?
  • If we were asked to defend this purchase, would we be able to?
  • Did we pay a fair rate?

The district will implement a reasonable method of allocating costs that equates to the relative benefit received by the program for the proportion of the costs charged to the program.

Period of Performance

Federal funds may be obligated on the later of the date funds become available or the submission date of the grant application, either in full form, or “Substantially Approvable Status (SAS)”, depending on the terms of the Federal award.

Federal funds may not be expended subsequent to the end date of the grant except to liquidate allowable obligations that were made on or before that date. All liquidations of prior obligations must be made within 90 days of the grant end-date, or an earlier date established by the granting agency.

The following table indicates the date that an expenditure is determined to be obligated:

IF THE OBLIGATION IS FOR

THE OBLIGATION WAS MADE

Acquisition of real or personal property On the date on which the district makes a binding written commitment to acquire the property
Personal services by an employee of the district When the services are performed
Personal services by a contractor who is not an employee of the district On the date on which the district makes a binding written commitment to obtain the services
Performance of work other than personal services On the date on which the district makes a binding written commitment to obtain the work
Public utility services When the district receives the services
Travel When the travel is taken
Rental of real or personal property When the district uses the property

Direct Costs

Expenditures charged directly to a federal grant award will follow all district policies and procedures as well as federal requirements applicable to those costs, including, but not limited to; procurement requirements, property standards, travel policies, and cost criteria established by 2 CFR Part 200, Subsection E, as identified in the allowable cost policy. Additionally, all direct expenditures will be allowable under the terms of the grant award and program regulations. Requirements followed will be the more restrictive of the local, state, or federal regulations associated with a particular type of expenditure.

Staff responsible for reviewing expenditures for allowability will be familiar with the allowable costs of all programs reviewed. Staff responsible for budget and expenditure monitoring will be responsible for ensuring all charges are reviewed by appropriate staff for allowability.

Prior approvals of expenditures, as stated in 2 CFR, Part 200 and the grant award terms, will be obtained prior to the expenditure being obligated. Expenditures will be supported by adequate documentation including all pertinent details that assists in determining the item was allowable.

Indirect Costs

Federal grant awards will include an amount of indirect expenditures that districts are entitled to for organization wide costs of the grantee that benefit the federal program being administered by the district, unless specifically disallowed by the terms of the grant award.

Indirect rates are negotiated by the district’s cognizant or oversight agency and can be applied to all Federal awards the district receives.

For grants awarded by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), indirect rates are calculated annually based on financial information obtained through the F-196. OSPI negotiates the indirect cost rate calculation methodology with the Department of Education every 5 years.

There are two types of federal indirect costs. A restricted rate is used for any federal program that has a “supplement, not supplant” requirement, which means the federal money is used to supplement the amount of money that a district has to spend on a particular program, and is not used “in place of” state/local funds. An unrestricted rate is used for programs that do not have a “supplement, not supplant” requirement.

The district is not required to claim any or all of the indirect amount they are entitled to, but may claim up to the full amount, as long as it is included in the district’s approved budget. The indirect rate may be applied to all allowable direct expenditures that will be claimed under a particular grant award, less some exceptions (e.g., indirect costs will only be applied to the first $25,000 of an individual contract).

No expenditures will be charged through both a direct cost and an indirect cost.

Adoption Date: 3/24/2016
Raymond School District #116



6111—TUITION

Tuition shall be charged to all persons age 21 or older who wish to attend the regular educational program. The formula for determining the rate of tuition is fixed by the state superintendent of public instruction.

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.225.220 Adults, children from other districts, agreements for attending school–Tuition

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6112—RENTAL OR LEASE OF DISTRICT REAL PROPERTY

When district real property is not needed, the board has the authority to call for bids to rent or lease any surplus real property. Notice of the intent to rent or lease property shall be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the district at least 45 days before the rental or lease takes effect, if the value of the rental or lease is $10,000.00 or more. The district may establish a minimum acceptable bid based upon the fair market value, provided that such minimum bid is non-discriminatory within classes of users.

Such property shall be rented or leased for lawful purposes. The rental or lease shall be in the best interests of the district and shall not interfere with the conduct of the district’s educational program and related activities. Proceeds from rental or lease of district property which are in excess of the operational costs incurred for such rental or lease shall be deposited in the capital projects fund or debt service fund.

At the option of the board of directors, after evaluating the sufficiency of the school district’s capital projects fund for purposes of meeting demands for new construction and improvements, moneys derived from the lease or rental or real property may be deposited into the district’s general fund to be used exclusively for nonrecurring costs related to operating school facilities, including but not limited to, expenses for maintenance.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.335.040 Surplus school property, rental, lease or use of–Authorized
RCW 28A.335.050 Surplus school property, rental, lease or use of–Joint use
RCW 28A.335.060 Surplus school property, rental lease or use of–Disposition of moneys received for
RCW 28A.335.070 Surplus school property, rental, lease or use of–Existing contracts not impaired
RCW 28A.335.080 Surplus school property, rental, lease or use of–Community use not impaired
RCW 28A.335.090 Conveyance and acquisition of property–Management
RCW 28A.335.130 Real property–Sale–Use of proceeds

Adoption Date: 2/21/06
Raymond School District #116



6113—RENTAL OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

The district shall purchase only those instruments which, because of cost and/or unsuitability as a solo instrument, are not likely to be purchased by parents and yet are needed for full instrumentation of school music groups. Such instruments shall be rented with the fee used to help cover maintenance costs, except when the rental instrument is in addition to an instrument that is already owned or rented by the student. Arrangements shall be made for the reduction/waiver of fees for students whose families, by reason of income, would have difficulty paying the fee.

The USDA child nutrition program guidelines shall be used to determine qualification for a reduction/waiver. Parents shall be notified of the availability of fee reduction/waivers. Rental instruments shall be used only in preparation for and playing in school organizations. The user shall be responsible for any damage to the instrument, which might occur while it is in his/her care.

The superintendent shall establish a rental fee for school-owned instruments.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6114—GIFTS OR DONATIONS

Gifts to District:

The board recognizes that individuals and organizations in the community may wish to contribute additional supplies or equipment to enhance or extend the instructional program. 
Any gift or donation to the district of real property can be accepted only by board approval. Additionally, any gift or donation to the district or to an individual school or department of money, materials or equipment having a value of $1,000 or greater will be subject to board approval.

The board will not authorize acceptance of gifts that are inappropriate, which carry with them unsuitable conditions, which will obligate the district to future expenditures from the general fund, or which are out of proportion to the value of the gift. All gifts will become district property and will be accepted without obligation relative to use and/or disposal.

The superintendent will establish criteria to be met in the acceptance of all gifts or donations to the district, regardless of whether they are solicited or unsolicited.

In no event will any commitment be made by a staff member or other individuals in return for any gift to the district or to a school or department without the board’s authorization. The board will not authorize gifts that are inappropriate, which carry with them unsuitable conditions or which will obligate the district to future expenditures from the general fund which are out of proportion to the value of the gift. All gifts will become district property and will be accepted without obligation relative to use and/or disposal.

Unsolicited Gifts or Donations to the District

Money or additional supplies and equipment donated by booster clubs or other groups or patrons to support specific teams or extra-curricular activities are not to result in unacceptable levels of disparity of allocation favoring one team or gender.

Solicited Gifts or Donations to the District

Certificated staff seeking donations for their classroom must obtain prior approval from the building principal. Other staff or administrators seeking donations to benefit an entire school or the district as a whole must obtain prior approval from the Superintendent or his/her designee. In no event will any commitment be made by a staff member or other individuals in return for any gift to the district or to a school or department without the board’s authorization.

In no event will any commitment be made by a staff member or other individuals in return for any gift to the district or to a school or department without the board’s authorization. The board will not authorize gifts that are inappropriate, which carry with them unsuitable conditions or which will obligate the district to future expenditures from the general fund which are out of proportion to the value of the gift. All gifts will become district property and will be accepted without obligation relative to use and/or disposal.

The superintendent will establish criteria to be met in the acceptance of gifts to the district.

Gifts to Staff:

The board recognizes that students and/or parents may wish to express their appreciation to school staff by giving gifts.  In recognition of the fact that not all families can afford to show their appreciation with expensive gifts, the board endiscourages the giving of of all but small, inexpensive gifts in favor of letters of appreciation instead.

Cross References:
3515 – Student Incentives
6100 – Revenues from Local, State and Federal Sources

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.030 Gifts, conveyances, etc., for scholarship and student aid purposes, receipt and administration
WAC 392-190-025 Recreational and athletic activity

Management Resources:
2015 – June Issue

Adoption Date: 9/24/15
Raymond School District #116



6114P—GIFTS OR DONATIONS

Equipment and material which are donated to a school or are brought to the school for temporary use will be reviewed in terms of suitability and durability and for any possible health or safety hazards. The school principal will be responsible for selecting other appropriate staff members to assist in the review process. If the equipment and/or materials are found to be unsuitable, the principal will indicate the reason(s) in writing. If found to be acceptable, the principal will submit a work order for appropriate installation. Donated playground equipment must be referred to the superintendent’s office before acceptance is granted. All gifts will become district property and will be accepted without obligation relative to use and/or disposal.

Any gift presented to the district will satisfy the following criteria:

  • The purpose or use be consistent with philosophy and programs of the district and Policy 6114;
  • The district will assume only a minimum financial obligation for installation, maintenance and operation;
  • The equipment will be free from health and/or safety hazards; and
  • The equipment will be free from a direct or implied commercial endorsement.

Adoption Date: 9/24/15
Raymond School District #116



6119—UNCOLLECTED NON-TAX REVENUE

The board will make an effort to collect all revenues due from federal, state, local and non-tax sources. At the first meeting in a new fiscal year, the superintendent will prepare a list of uncollected non-tax revenues from the past fiscal year including but not limited to unpaid rentals, fines, fees, and other charges and the actions that have been taken to collect the receivables. If not collected by December 30, the board will declare the remaining receivables as uncollectible.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6120—INVESTMENT OF FUNDS

The superintendent is authorized to direct and authorize the county or state treasurer to invest district moneys, which are not needed for current obligations in any district fund. Such investments shall be made with the objective of producing the greatest return, consistent with prudent practice.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.300 Investment of funds, including funds received by ESD—Authority–Procedure
RCW 28A.320.320 Investment of funds of district not needed for immediate necessities–Service fee
RCW 36.29.020 Custodian of moneys–Investment of funds not required or immediate expenditures, service fee
RCW 43.250 Investment of local government funds
WAC 210-01 Local Government Investment Pool

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6210—PURCHASING: AUTHORIZATION AND CONTROL

The board authorizes the superintendent to direct expenditures and purchases, within the limits of the detailed annual budget, for the school year. Board approval for purchase of capital outlay items is required when the aggregate total of a requisition exceeds $5,000 except that the superintendent will have the authority to make capital outlay purchases without advance approval when it is necessary to protect the interests of the district or the health and safety of the staff or students.

The superintendent will establish requisition and purchase order procedures as a means of monitoring the expenditure of funds. Staff members who obligate the district without proper prior authorization may be held personally responsible for payment of such obligations.

Legal References 2 CFR 200.439(b)(2)
Adoption Date: 10/25/18
Revised Dates: 12.11; 08.18



6210P—PURCHASING: AUTHORIZATION AND CONTROL

Purchasing requests will be approved by the superintendent or designee. At a minimum, such requests will provide the following information:

  1. Name of school, department and originator, and date originated;
  2. School department or person to which material is to be delivered;
  3. Budget year;
  4. Specifications of equipment items (manufacturer, stock number, );
  5. Estimated cost based on latest price; and F. Authorizing signature/email

Materials desired for “examination” should be ordered via purchase order and include a statement that “the following items are for examination for 30 days.”

The business office shall encumber the expenditure against a specific budget line item to guard against the creation of liabilities in excess of revenues.

Minor & Major Purchases

  1. Minor Purchases: Any purchase of furniture, equipment, or supplies, except books; and, building improvements, repair, or other work which is estimated to cost $5,000 or less.
  2. Major Purchases: Any purchase of furniture, equipment, or supplies (except books) which is estimated to cost more than $5,000. These will be approved by the Superintendent.

Minor Purchase Procedures

  • Minor purchases may be authorized by the superintendent or designee.
  • Employees will submit requests for supplies and equipment to their supervisor with his/her signed approval.
  • All purchases of more than $3,000 shall be made in accordance with Policy 6220 – Bid Particular attention is to be given to whether the funding source is the Federal government or other.
  • Purchases authorized by the superintendent or designee shall be processed through the finance office by delivery of a purchase order, credit card authorization or email.
  • Negotiations with suppliers regarding purchase orders issued shall be conducted through the finance office.

Emergency expenditures may be made through oral agreement with the finance office for the assignment of a purchase order number (or use of a credit card) to be included on a confirmation requisition. For these purposes, an emergency is defined as an unforeseen combination of events that calls for immediate action to prevent physical injury to persons or to property or to continue an activity which is critical to the operation of the district.



6211—NON-INSTRUCTIONAL OPERATIONS

Property Records

All equipment costing $1000 or more should be inventoried. Theft sensitive equipment costing less than $1000 should also be identified. Such equipment includes computers, televisions, VCR’s, cameras, instruments, etc.

For purposes of this policy, “equipment” shall mean a unit of furniture or furnishings, an instrument, a machine, an apparatus or a set of articles which retains its shape and appearance with use, is non expendable, and does not lose its identity when incorporated into a more complex unit. The superintendent or designees shall ensure that inventories of equipment are systematically and accurately recorded and are updated and adjusted annually by reference of purchase orders and withdrawal reports. No equipment shall be removed for personal or non-school use except according to Board policy. A visual walk through inspection of a randomly select building or unit will be conducted annually.

Property records shall show, as appropriate to the item recorded, the:

A. description and identification;

B. manufacture;

C. year of purchase;

D. initial cost;

E. location;

F. condition;

G. all capital assets purchased with Federal funds.

Adoption Date: 3/24/05
Raymond School District #116



6212—CHARGE CARDS

For official district purchases and acquisitions the board authorizes the use of credit cards.  The board shall approve any contract for the issuance of credit cards, including the credit limit.  Credit cards may be issued to the board and the superintendent.  The superintendent or his/her designee is responsible for the authorization and control of the use of credit card funds, subject to final board approval of payments.

Charge cards may be used for those expenses authorized by the superintendent or his/her designee. Upon billing or no later than thirty (30) days of the billing date, the officer or staff member using a charge card shall submit a fully itemized travel expense voucher. Any charges not properly identified on the travel expense voucher or not allowed following review by the auditing officer shall be paid by the official or staff member. Any official or staff member who has been issued a charge card shall not use the card if any disallowed charges are outstanding.

The superintendent shall establish procedures for the issuance and use of charge cards.

Cross References:
Board Policy 5341 Reimbursement for Travel

Legal References:
RCW 42.24.115 Municipal corporations and political subdivisions–Issuance of charge cards to officers and employees for travel expenses
RCW 43.09.2855 Local governments–Use of credit cards

Adoption Date: 12/14/16
Raymond School District #116



6213—REIMBURSEMENT FOR TRAVEL EXPENSES

The actual and necessary expenses of a director, administrator, staff member or designate of the district incurred in the course of performing services for the district, whether within or outside of the district, may be reimbursed in accordance with the approval and reimbursement procedures of the district. For purposes of this policy, travel expense includes amounts paid for use of personal automobiles, other transportation, and actual expenses or reimbursement in lieu of actual expenses for meals, lodging and related items that are necessary while in the conduct of official business of the district. A staff member or district officer may be reimbursed for gratuities not exceeding customary percentages for the cost of meals as well as reasonable amounts for such services as baggage handling when the costs are incurred while the individual is engaged in district business or other approved travel.

Reimbursement for travel expenses shall be made pursuant to the federal internal revenue code and internal revenue service regulations.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.050 Reimbursement of expenses of directors, superintendents, other school representatives, and superintendent candidates – Advancing anticipated
RCW 42.24.090 Municipal corporations and political subdivisions – Reimbursement claims by officers and employees – Detailed account – Travel allowances and allowances in lieu of actual expenses – Certification – Forms
State Auditor Bul. #301-III(D) Employee travel expenses

Adoption Date: 2/22/00
Raymond School District #116



6213P—REIMBURSEMENT FOR TRAVEL EXPENSES

Travel Request

Travel requests must be approved by the staff member’s immediate supervisor prior to submission to the superintendent. The travel request must include itemized anticipated expenses (meals, lodging, registration and any other estimated expenses) for which reimbursement shall be requested upon completion of travel. The request is to also include the budget category to which the reimbursement is to be charged.

Student expenses, as allowed by particular grant rules, may be submitted on a per diem basis rather than with receipts. The amount of reimbursement will be determined by the particular grant when available, or through consultation between the district office and the concerned staff member.

Reimbursement of Claims

The Expense Claim Voucher Form shall be submitted to the District Office no later than the 5th of the following month.

Reimbursable Expenses

Lodging: Reasonable rates; itemized receipt required.

Meals: Reasonable rates up to $30 per day; itemized receipt required. There may be some geographical areas that require additional funds. Such costs may be approved by the superintendent.

Note: According to IRS regulations, certain reimbursable meals are considered taxable income and are subject to federal withholding, FICA and Medicare taxes. Those meals which are considered taxable are those which meet the following criteria:

  1. Are not part of a conference pre-paid registration;
  2. Are not part of a meeting where lunch is an integral part of the program;
  3. Do not involve overnight travel.

Such reimbursable meals which are considered taxable income will be discussed with the employee’s supervisor prior to the approval of the travel request.

Airline, Train, Bus Fare: Tourist rate; canceled ticket serves as receipt.

Mileage: Current IRS rate

Note: For staff who choose to use a personal car, reimbursement is allowed only when approved in advance by the staff member’s supervisor, and the transportation supervisor indicates that there are no district vehicles available. Whenever possible, staff members will use a district vehicle rather than personal vehicles. Carpooling is encouraged for trips when more than one person is attending the same event or activity.

Hotel and Motel Expenses: Individual receipts area required from each staff member who obtains reimbursement from the district or whose said expenses are paid for by the district.

Non-Reimbursable Expenses

The following expenses are not reimbursable:

A. Alcoholic beverages or snacks other than regular meals.

B. Personal telephone calls.

C. Mileage to and from home.

D. Entertainment.



6215—VOUCHER CERTIFICATION AND APPROVAL

Expenditures shall be made on district voucher forms. Before vouchers are submitted to the board for payment, they shall be audited and certified by the district’s appointed auditing officer for accuracy and proof that the goods or services have been received and are satisfactory and that previous payment has not been made. The certification must be signed and dated by the auditing officer or his/her delegate. Vouchers shall be approved by a recorded affirmative vote of a majority of the board.

The board authorizes advance payment of a voucher when a delay in payment would otherwise result in a penalty or late fee or an interest charge on the unpaid balance except that advance payment for goods or services to a single vendor in excess of $5,000 shall not be permitted unless previously authorized by the board through a bid award or by action of the board at a preceding board meeting. The board shall review and approve all such advance payments at its next regularly scheduled public meeting. In the event the claim is disapproved, the auditing officer and superintendent shall cause the claims to be recognized as receivables and pursue collection diligently until the funds are collected or until the board approves the payment of those claims.

The auditing officer and the superintendent shall each furnish an official bond, for not less than $50,000, for the faithful discharge of such duties. The school district shall purchase and pay for the surety bonds.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 8300 Risk Management

Legal References:
RCW 28A.330.080 Payment of claims
RCW 28A.330.090 Auditing committee and expenditures
RCW 42.24.080 Municipal corporations and political subdivisions–Auditing and payment–Authentication and certification
RCW 42.24.180 Taxing District–Issuance of warrants or checks before approval by legislative body–Conditions
State Auditor’s Voucher certification and approval
Bulletin #301-III(F)

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6215P—VOUCHER CERTIFICATION AND APPROVAL

All claims against a school district must be pre-audited by the auditing officer of the municipality or his delegate. In addition, all claims must be certified by the auditing officer. This certification may be made on each individual claim voucher or, subject to the acceptance and approval of the board, a blanket voucher certification may be used so long as it indicates the particular vouchers so certified. The use of a blanket certification in no way relieves the auditing officer of his responsibility and liability for each individual voucher so certified. The certification must be signed and dated by the auditing officer or his delegate. For all claims, except expense reimbursement claims certified by officers or employees (see employee travel procedures), the certification must include the following language:

I, the undersigned, do hereby certify under penalty of perjury that the materials have been furnished, the services rendered or the labor performed as described on voucher numbers _________ through _________ are just, due and unpaid obligation against the school district and that I am authorized to authenticate and certify to said claim.

The auditing officer’s certification for employee/officer expense reimbursement claims must include the following language:

I, the undersigned, do hereby certify under penalty of perjury that the expense reimbursement claims voucher numbers _________ through __________ are just, due and unpaid obligation against the ________________ School District and that I am authorized to certify to said claim.

To indicate board approval for payment of those vouchers audited and certified by the auditing officer, the following statement must be entered in the minutes of the governing body:

Vouchers audited and certified by the auditing officer as required by RCW 42.24.080, and those expense reimbursement claims certified as required by RCW 42.24.090, have been recorded on a listing which has been made available to the board.

As of this date _________________ the board, by a (unanimous, majority) vote, does approve for payment those vouchers included in the above list and further described as follows: (funds) voucher numbers ____ through ____ in the total amount of $__________.



6216—REIMBURSEMENT FOR GOODS AND SERVICES: WARRANTS

A majority of the members of the board shall approve the issuance of all warrants, except that advance payments may be made on vouchers when authorized by the board.

Expenditures of district moneys shall be made on approved vouchers by a warrant signed by the secretary of the board or, in his/her absence, the board chairman.

Warrants to be issued shall first be recorded with the county auditor’s office and the county treasurer’s office showing date, payee, and amount.

Unclaimed or Reissued Warrants

Warrants which have not been redeemed within a period of twelve (12) months or longer shall be canceled by the authority of the board. Such action shall take place on or before the end of each calendar year. In the event that a warrant has been lost, a replacement warrant may be issued following acknowledgment of a “stop payment” with the district’s depository. A replacement warrant may also be issued to the estate of a deceased staff member upon notice from the court. A replacement warrant may also be issued to a claimant whose warrant has been canceled because of the time limitation imposed by this policy.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 7322 Voucher Certification and Approval

Legal References:
RCW 28A.330.080 Payment of Claims
RCW 28A.330.090 Auditing Committee and Expenditures
RCW 28A.330.230 Drawing and issuance of warrants
RCW 63.29 Uniform Unclaimed Property Act
RCW 39.56.040 Cancellation of Municipal Warrants

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6220‑BID or PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

The board recognizes the importance of:

• maximizing the use of district resources;
• the need for sound business practices in spending public money;
• the requirement of complying with state and federal laws governing purchasing and public works;
• the importance of standardized purchasing regulations; and
• the need for clear documentation.

I. Procurement and Public Works Using State Funds

A. Furniture, Supplies, or Equipment

Whenever the estimated cost of furniture, supplies or equipment (except books) will cost:

• less than $40,000, no competitive bidding process is required to make the purchase;
• between $40,000 and $75,000, the board will follow the informal competitive bidding process by requiring quotes from at least three different sources to be obtained in writing or by telephone and recorded for the public to review;
• over $75,000, the board will follow the formal competitive bidding process by:

1. preparing clear and definite plans and specifications for such purchases;

2. providing notice of the call for formal bids by publication in at least one newspaper of general circulation in the district at least once each week for two consecutive weeks;

3. ensuring that the district takes steps to assure that when possible, the district will use small and minority businesses, women’s business enterprises and labor surplus firms ;

4. providing the clear and definite plans and specifications to those interested in submitting a bid;

5. requiring that bids be in writing;

6. opening and reading bids in public on the date and in the place named in the notice; and

7. filing all bids for public inspection after opening.

B. Exemptions

The board may waive bid requirements for purchases:

• clearly and legitimately limited to a single source of supply;
• involving special facilities or market conditions;
• in the event of an emergency;
• of insurance or bonds; and
• involving public works in the event of an emergency.

“Emergency” means unforeseen circumstances beyond the district’s control that present a real, immediate threat to the proper performance of essential functions or will likely result in material loss or damage to property, bodily injury, or loss of life if immediate action is not taken.

Whenever the board waives bid requirements, the board will issue a document explaining the factual basis for the exception and record the contract for open public inspection.

C. Rejection of Bids

The board may by resolution reject any and all bids and make further calls for bids in the same manner as the original call.

D. Interlocal Cooperation Act

The board reserves the right to enter into inter-local cooperative agreements for purchases and public works with other governmental agencies pursuant to the Interlocal Cooperation Act, Chapter 39.34 RCW.

E. Crimes Against Children

The board will include in any contract for services with an entity or individual other than an employee of the district a provision requiring the contractor to prohibit any employee of the contractor from working at a public school who has contact with children at a public school during the course of his or her employment and who has pled guilty to or been convicted of any felony crime specified under RCW 28A.400.322. The contract shall also contain a provision that any failure to comply with this section shall be grounds for the district immediately terminating the contract.

The superintendent will establish bidding and contract awarding procedures for all purchases of furniture, equipment, supplies (except books), or public works projects consistent with state law.

F. Use of State Funds for Improvements or Repairs

The board may make improvements or repairs to district property through a district department without following the competitive bidding process if the total cost of improvements or repairs does not exceed $100,000. If the board estimates that the total cost of a building, improvement, repair, or other public works project is $100,000 or more, the board will follow the formal competitive bidding process outlined above, unless the contract is let using the small works roster process authorized by RCW 39.04.155 or under any other procedure authorized for school districts.

II. Procurement Using Federal Funds

A. Goods

When the district uses federal funds for procurement of goods (furniture, supplies, equipment, and textbooks):

• Purchases of $10,000 or less do not require quotes. However, the district must consider price to be reasonable, and, to the extent practical, distribute purchases equitably among suppliers.
• Purchases between $10,000 and $250,000 must be procured using price or rate quotations from three or more qualified sources.
• Purchases of $250,000 or more must be publicly solicited using sealed bids or requests for proposals.

B. Services

When the district uses federal funds for procurement of services:

• Purchases of $10,000 or less do not require quotes. However, the district must consider price to be reasonable, and, to the extent practical, distribute purchases equitably among suppliers.
• Purchases between $10,000 and $250,000 must be procured using price or rate quotations from a reasonable number of qualified sources.
• Purchases of $250,000 or more must be publicly solicited using sealed bids or requests for proposals.

C. Noncompetitive Procurement

Noncompetitive procurement may be used only when one of the following four circumstances applies:

• The item is only available from a single source;
• The public exigency or emergency for the requirement will not permit a delay resulting from competitive solicitation;
• The awarding agency (e.g., OSPI) authorizes noncompetitive procurement in response to a written request from the district; or
• After solicitation of a number of sources, competition is determined inadequate.

The district must maintain documentation supporting the applicable circumstance for noncompetitive procurement.

D. Suspension and Debarment

Before entering into federally funded vendor contracts for goods and services that equal or exceed $25,000 and any subcontract award, the district will ensure the vendor is not suspended or debarred from participating in federal assistance programs.

E. Conflict of Interest

No employee, officer, or agent may participate in the selection, award, or administration of a contract supported by federal funds if he or she has a real or apparent conflict of interest. Such a conflict would arise when the employee, officer, or agent, any member of his or her immediate family, his or her partner, or an organization that employs or is about to employ any of the parties indicated herein has a financial or other interest in or a tangible personal benefit from a firm considered for a contract.

No employee, officer, or agent of the district may solicit or accept gratuities, favors, or anything of monetary value from contractors or parties to subcontracts. Violation of these standards may result in disciplinary action including, but not limited to, suspension, dismissal, or removal.

III. Procedures

The superintendent or designee will establish bidding and contract awarding procedures consistent with state and federal law.

Legal References: RCW 28A.335.190 Advertising for bids — Competitive bid procedures — Purchases from inmate work programs — Telephone or written quotation solicitation, limitations — Emergencies
RCW 28A.400.330 Crimes against children — Contractor employees — Termination of contract
RCW 39.04.155 Small works roster contract procedures — Limited public works process Definition
RCW 39.04.280 Competitive bidding requirements — Exemptions
RCW 39.26.160 Bid Awards – Considerations – Requirements and criteria to be set forth – Negotiations – Use of enterprise vendor registrations and bid notification system
RCW 39.30.060 Bids on public works — Identification, substitution of contractors
Chapter. 39.34 RCW Interlocal Cooperation Act
2 CFR Part 200—Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards
2 CFR 200.67 Mirco-purchase
2 CFR 200.88 Simplified Acquisition Threshold
2 CFR 200.318 – General Procurement Standards
2 CFR 200.320 Methods of Procurement to be Followed
2 CFR 200.318-.326
2 CFR 3485 Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

Management Resources: 2018 – August Issue
2017 – July Issue
2016 – March Issue
2015 – October Policy Issue
2015 – June Policy Issue
2013 – June Issue
2012 – April Issue
2011 – February Issue
Policy News, October 2005 Competitive Bid Process Changes
Policy News, June 2001 Legislation Further Simplifies Bid Compliance

Adoption Date: 10/25/18
Revised Dates: 10.00; 06.01; 10.05; 12.09; 02.11; 12.11; 04.12; 06.13; 06.15; 10.15; 03.16; 07.17; 08.18



6220P‑BID or REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

The following procedures will be in effect for purchasing and public works through the bidding or request for proposal process:

A. The district will publicly open and read formal bids on the date, time, and place named in the notice and then will file the bids for public inspection. Any interested member of the public may attend the bid opening. It will be the bidder’s sole responsibility to see that the district receives his/her bid prior to the time set for opening of bids. The district will return any bid received after the time set for opening the bids to the bidder unopened and without consideration. The district will accept proposals in the place named and no later than the date and time named in the notice.

B. Formal bid or proposal tabulations may be presented at a meeting of the board for study purposes;

C. The board will award formal contract on the basis of staff recommendations;

D. Specifications using brand names and manufacturers’ catalog numbers are for identifying and establishing a quality standard. The board may consider bids or proposals on equal items providing the bidder or proposer specifies brand and model and furnishes descriptive literature. The board will condition its acceptance of alternative “equal” items upon its inspection and testing after receipt. If the board does not find the items to be equal, the board will return the items at the seller’s expense and cancel the contract;

E. The district will reserve the right to reject any or all bids or proposals, waive any formalities, and/or irregularities, and cancel the solicitation, if a reason exists;

F. On construction projects, the bidder will include a notarized statement, agreeing to comply with prevailing wage and affirmative action requirements. The bidder will also provide payment and performance bonds;

G. The superintendent or designee may solicit bids or proposals by telephone and/or written quotation for purchases of furniture, equipment, and supplies that have an estimated cost in excess of $40,000 up to $75,000. At least three telephone or written quotations will be secured prior to the date established by the superintendent or designee. All telephone quotations must be confirmed promptly in writing to constitute a valid quotation;

H. For public works projects estimated to cost $300,000 or less, the superintendent or designee may solicit bids by telephone, electronic, or written quotations from contractors on the appropriate small works roster. The district will not break a project into units or phases in order to come within the scope of the small works roster process or limited public works process. Each year, the district will publish a notice of opportunity regarding the small works roster in at least one newspaper of general circulation in the district and then revise small works roster accordingly. The district will also add responsible contractors to the small works roster any time a contractor submits a written request and necessary records. The application form be designed to collect such information as (l) name of contractor, (2) state of Washington contractor’s license number, (3) bonding verification, (4) liability insurance coverage, (5) related contracts completed, and (6) references (bond and clients). Contractors desiring to be placed on or remain on the small works roster are required to keep current records of applicable licenses, certifications, registrations, bonding, insurance, or other appropriate matters on file with the district.

The district will employ the following steps to engage a contractor for a small works project:

1. Invitations for quotations shall include an estimate of the scope and nature of the work to be performed as well as materials and equipment to be furnished. Completion date; contractor’s assurances (prevailing wages, fair employment, etc.); bid and payment and performance bond requirements; opportunity to visit the work site; closing date; and bid form may be provided, however, detailed plans and specifications need not be included in the invitation;

2. The district may invite quotations from all appropriate contractors on the appropriate small works roster. As an alternative, the district may invite quotations from at least five contractors on the appropriate small works roster who have indicated the capability of performing the kind of work being contracted, in a manner that will equitably distribute the opportunity among the contractors on the appropriate roster. However, if the estimated cost of the work is from $150,000 to $300,000, and the district chooses to solicit bids from less than all the appropriate contractors on the appropriate small works roster, the district will notify the remaining contractors on the appropriate small works roster that it is seeking quotations on the work. The district has the sole option of determining whether this notice to the remaining contractors is made by: (i) publishing notice in a legal newspaper in general circulation in the area where the work is to be done; (ii) mailing a notice to these contractors; or (iii) sending a notice to these contractors by facsimile or other electronic means;

3. Immediately after an award is made, the bid quotations obtained will be recorded, open to public inspection, and available by telephone inquiry; and

4. The district will award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder as defined in RCW 39.04.010. The district will make available a list of the contracts awarded under that process at least once every year. The list shall contain the name of the contractor or vendor awarded the contract, the amount of the contract, a brief description of the type of work performed or items purchased under the contract, and the date of award. The list shall also state the location where the bid quotations for these contracts are available for public inspection.

The following will be in effect for purchasing and public works awards:

A. The contract for the work or purchase shall be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder as described in RCW 39.26.160(2), but the board may by resolution reject any and all bids and make further calls for bids in the same manner as the original call. In determining whether the bidder is a responsible bidder under RCW 39.26.160(2), the district must consider the following elements:

1. The ability, capacity, and skill of the bidder to perform the contract or provide the service required;

2. The character, integrity, reputation, judgment, experience, and efficiency of the bidder;

3. Whether the bidder can perform the contract within the time specified;

4. The quality of performance of previous contracts or services;

5. The previous and existing compliance by the bidder with laws relating to the contract or services;

6. Whether, within the three-year period immediately preceding the date of the bid solicitation, the bidder has been determined by a final and binding citation and notice of assessment issued by the department of labor and industries or through a civil judgment entered by a court of limited or general jurisdiction to have willfully violated any provision of chapter 49.46, 49.48, or 49.52 RCW, as defined in RCW 49.48.082. Before awarded a contract, a bidder shall submit to the district a signed statement in accordance with RCW 9A.72.085, verifying under penalty of perjury that the bidder is in compliance with the responsible bidder criteria requirement of this subsection of RCW;

7. The district may secure such other information as may have bearing on the decision to award the contract.

B. Before award of a public works contract, a bidder must meet the following responsibility criteria to be a responsible bidder and qualified for award of a public works project. The bidder must:

1. At the time of bid submittal, have a certificate of registration in compliance with chapter 18.27 RCW;

2. Have a current state unified business identifier number;

3. If applicable, have industrial insurance coverage for the bidder’s employees working in Washington as required in Title 51 RCW; an employment security department number, as required in Title 50 RCW; and a state excise tax registration number, as required in Title 82 RCW;

4. Not be disqualified from bidding on any public works contract under RCW 39.06.010 or 39.12.065(3);

5. If bidding on a public works project subject to the apprenticeship utilization requirements in RCW 39.04.320, not have been found out of compliance by the Washington state apprenticeship and training council for working apprentices out of ratio, without appropriate supervision, or outside their approved work processes, as outlined in their standards of apprenticeship under chapter 49.04 RCW for the one-year period immediately preceding the date of the bid solicitation;

6. Until December 31, 2013, not have violated RCW 39.04.370 more than one time as determined by the department of labor and industries; and

7. Within the three-year period immediately preceding the date of the bid solicitation, not have been determined by a final and binding citation and notice of assessment issued by the department of labor and industries or through a civil judgment entered by a court of limited or general jurisdiction to have willfully violated, as defined in RCW 49.48.082, any provision of chapter 49.46, 49.48, or 49.52 RCW (before award of a contract, a bidder shall submit to the district a signed statement in accordance with RCW 9A.72.085 verifying under penalty of perjury that the bidder is in compliance with the responsible bidder criteria requirement of this subsection).

In addition to the bidder responsibility criteria, the district may adopt relevant supplemental criteria in accordance with RCW 39.04.350(3) for determining bidder responsibility, applicable to a particular project with which the bidder must meet.

I. Formal written contracts will be prepared for all major construction and repair projects. After a majority of the board votes to approve a contract, the board president/chair and secretary sign the contract on behalf of the board and record the action in the minutes. . All contracts will provide that, in the event that the district files suit to enforce the terms of the contract, the venue will be the county where the district is located. All contracts will also provide that if the district is successful in the suit, the court may order reimbursement of the district’s attorney fees and court costs, as the court deems reasonable. Any contract for services with an entity or individual other than an employee of the district shall include a provision requiring the contractor to prohibit any of its employees who has pled guilty to or been convicted of any felony crime specified under RCW 28A.400.322 and who would have contact with children at a public school during the course of his or her employment from working at a public school. The contract shall also contain a provision that any failure to comply with this section shall be grounds for the district immediately terminating the contract.



6230—RELATIONS WITH VENDORS

Financial and business transactions of the district will conform to the law and be consistent with sound and ethical business practices. The district will make purchasing decisions based on objectivity and will not be influenced by friendships or other personal relationships. Neither board members, administrators, nor staff will solicit or accept a gift or favor from vendors, prospective vendors, other firms, or individuals who have had or hope to have transactions with the district. Board members, administrators, and staff are prohibited from financial interests in any district purchase, sale, or other transaction.

Cross References: 5251 – Conflicts of Interest
1610 – Conflicts of Interest 1st Class Districts
1610 – Conflicts of Interest 2nd Class Districts

Legal References: RCW 42.23.030 Interest in contract prohibited — Exceptions
RCW 42.23.040 Remote interests

2 CFR 200.318(c)(1)
Adoption Date: 10/25/18
Revised Dates: 12.11; 08.18



6240—FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION

The board recognizes that staff members and others associated with the district are expected to pay for their own food and beverages. However, under certain circumstances when the district is deriving benefit, the district may expend funds for food and beverage consumed by staff and others while in the conduct of the business of the district.

The superintendent is directed to establish procedures which reflect the intent of the board to provide for reasonable food and beverage consumption while in the conduct of business that is of benefit to the district. Such expenditures shall be supported by statements that show:

A. the occasion for incurring expenses;

B. the nature of expenses that were incurred; and

C. the general nature of the business that was being conducted.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6240P—FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION

Ceremonies, Dedications and Open Houses. Reasonable expenses associated with ceremonies and/or dedications are permitted provided that the events have been authorized by the board and serve a public purpose.

Meetings, Study Sessions, Training Sessions. Food and nonalcoholic beverages may be served at district expense when a meeting, study session, training session or hearing continues through normal mealtime hours and will facilitate the continuance of the session with minimum disruption. Expenses for food and beverage must be reasonable and serve a public purpose. Participants shall be restricted to officers, staff members, volunteers or “quasi-employees,”—non-compensated volunteers, or advisory committee members who might otherwise be entitled to actual monetary payment. Snacks and nonalcoholic beverages of a nominal nature may be provided at meetings, study or training sessions when such occur during non-mealtime hours. Such events must be approved by the superintendent. All expenditures must be properly documented consistent with board policy.

Individual Conferences. Reasonable expenses for food and nonalcoholic beverages are permitted when staff members are engaged in conferences or meetings with individuals or small groups who have an interest in the operation of the district.



6500—RISK MANAGEMENT

The board believes the district must identify and measure risks of loss due to the damage or destruction of district property or to claims against the district by others claiming to have been harmed by the action or inaction of the district, its officers or staff. A risk management program shall be implemented to reduce or eliminate risks where possible, to determine which risks the district can afford to assume and to transfer to an insurance company those risks which the district does not wish to assume or cannot economically afford to assume. Such a program shall consider the benefits, if any, of joining with other units of local government for joint purchasing of insurance, joint self-funding, joint self-insuring or joint employment of a risk manager. The superintendent shall assign the primary responsibility for the administration and supervision of the risk management program to a single person. The board shall review the status of the risk management program each year.

The district shall purchase and pay for surety bonds for the superintendent, business manager and such other staff and in such amounts as the board shall from time to time determine to be necessary for honest performance of the staff in the conduct of the district’s financial operations. Such bonds may include a deductible proviso not to exceed two percent of the employee’s annual salary.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.400.350 Liability, life, health, health care, accident, disability and salary insurance authorized–Premiums
RCW 28A.400.360 Liability insurance for officials and employees authorized
RCW 28A.400.370 Mandatory insurance protection for employees
RCW 28A.320.100 Actions against officers, employees or agents of school districts and educational service districts–Defense, costs, fees—Payment of obligation
RCW 28A.320.060 Officers, employees or agents of school districts or educational service districts, insurance to protect and hold personally harmless
RCW 28A.330.100(10)Additional powers of board|RCW 48.62 Local government insurance transactions

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6500P—RISK MANAGEMENT

The risk manager shall:

A. Report to the superintendent situations where he/she feels the district faces the greatest potential liability, the changes he/she feels should be made to reduce the risk and the estimated cost of such changes;

B. Examine the feasibility of and conduct in-service education classes for staff in areas where he/she feels risk is great or can be lessened;

C. Assume responsibility for the district’s insurance program;

D. Review annually the insurable value of the district’s buildings and equipment and report to the superintendent; and

E. Supervise an annual inventory of all real property and equipment, preparing the inventories in duplicate, with one copy maintained in the school and one in the district office. (See policy 6570 – Data and Record Management.)



6510—SAFETY

Playground Equipment

The board recognizes that playground equipment is an essential part of a complete school facility. All playground equipment, whether purchased by the district or donated by a community or school-related group, should be assessed in terms of suitability and durability and for possible health or safety hazards. Consideration shall also be given to potential hazards when the playground is unsupervised during non-school hours.

The superintendent shall develop specifications for playground equipment and related play surfaces. These specifications shall serve as criteria for the selection of playground equipment. Selection and installation of playground equipment shall be based upon safety and contribution to child development.

Chemical and Laboratory Safety

The board recognizes the potential health and safety hazards that exist as a result of chemical storage and handling. Instruction shall be emphasized in the safe and proper use of chemicals and substances and proper laboratory techniques. All students and staff are to wear safety glasses or goggles whenever they are working under potentially hazardous conditions. Laboratories should be ventilated sufficiently enough to provide a healthful, non-hazardous environment.

The superintendent is directed to establish safety guidelines and procedures which will minimize the hazards inherent in the science classes and laboratories in the schools.

Cross References:
Board Policy 2151 Interscholastic Activities
Board Policy 6511 Staff Safety
Board Policy 6605 Student Safety Walking to School and Riding Buses

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6510P—PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT

Plans to install playground equipment, either temporarily or permanently at a school site, shall be reviewed by a committee appointed by the school principal and other appropriate staff members. A representative from the current insurance carrier shall be contacted prior to installation.

Guidelines:

A. Equipment must meet the safety criteria listed below:

  1. All playground equipment must have an immediate ground surface which limits the impact from a fall, according to ASTM F-355-72. The safety surface must extend to the maximum distance to which a fall could occur.
  2. Equipment is to be placed so as to take advantage of topography of surrounding terrain and far enough apart so that there will be a dispersement of children allowing safe, free movement with the least possible congestion.
  3. All equipment is to be free from hazardous protrusions, points and sharp edges.
  4. Exposed component materials are to be rust-free, clean and durable to use and weather with a minimum amount of splintering, flaking or other deterioration. Lead paint and creosote shall not be used.
  5. Equipment that is low to the ground and with a six (6) foot maximum vertical limit is preferred.
  6. All moving parts are to be concealed and be designed to minimize the chances of pinching or catching of clothing or of body.
  7. All equipment must be securely anchored according to manufacturer’s recommendations and installed by the manufacturer or his/her authorized representative.

B. Equipment should require a minimum of maintenance, specifically for replacement of parts and painting.

C. Equipment should be aesthetically appealing, and encourage active and creative use.

D. Equipment should be difficult to vandalize.

E. Unpadded cement or steel stationary poles should not be in areas intended for running games.

The maintenance supervisor shall coordinate installation of approved equipment with the school principal. Quarterly inspections will be conducted.



6511—STAFF SAFETY

The board recognizes that safety and health standards should be incorporated into all aspects of the operation of the district. Rules for safety and prevention of accidents shall be posted in compliance with OSHA and WISHA requirements. All hazardous chemicals will be identified and properly labeled. Staff members will be trained in the use of these chemicals specific to their respective jobs. Proper records will be maintained to verify that all of the preventive and safety measures are in place. Injuries and accidents shall be reported to the district office.

The district shall have at least one staff member at each school and work site in the district who holds a valid certificate of first aid training from the department of labor and industries, U.S. Bureau of Mines or the American Red Cross or equivalent training provided by the district nurses. Each school and work site shall have first aid supplies readily accessible.

The superintendent shall develop necessary safety and health standards to comply with Department of Labor requirements.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 6510 Safety
Board Policy 6512 Infection Control Program

Legal References:
WAC 296-24-020 Management’s responsibility
WAC 296-24-040 Accident prevention program
WAC 296-24-045 Safety and health committee plan
WAC 296-24-055 Safety bulletin board
WAC 296-24-06105 What work places does this rule apply to?
WAC 296-24-06120 How must an employer ensure that first-aid assistance is available in the workplace?
WAC 296-24-06130 What must first-aid training cover?
WAC 296-24-06135 How often must employees complete first-aid training?
WAC 296-24-06140 How must an employer document first-aid training?
WAC 296-24-06145 What is the requirement for first aid supplies?
WAC 296-24-06150 What is the requirement to provide a first-aid station?
WAC 296-24-073 Safe place standards
WAC 296-62-054 Hazard communication standard
WAC 296-24-073 Safe place standards
WAC 296-62-054 Hazard communication standard

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6511P—STAFF SAFETY

The supervisor of each school and/or work site in the district is responsible for:

A. General Safety

  1. Maintaining a log and summary of all recordable occupational injuries and illnesses occurring at the work site. (A recordable occupational injury or illness is any injury or illness which results in an occupational fatality, lost work days, need for transfer to a new job, or medical treatment beyond first aid.)
  2. Providing training programs to improve the skill and competency in the safe use of powered materials handling equipment, use of machine tool operations, use of toxic material, and operation of utility systems prior to assignment to jobs involving such exposures.
  3. Implementing an accident prevention program which describes how to report unsafe conditions, how to use protective equipment, how to respond to emergencies and how to report injuries.
  4. Forming a safety and health committee composed of representative of management and employees, which shall review safety and health inspections to assist in correction of identified unsafe conditions or practices and to evaluate accident investigations and recommend improvements where needed. (Minutes of the committee shall be recorded and shall be retained for one year.)
  5. Maintaining a safety bulletin board sufficient in size to post and display safety bulletins, newsletters, posters, accident statistics and other safety educational material.
  6. Assuring that a person who holds a valid certificate of first aid training is present or available at all times.
  7. Maintaining a well-marked first aid kit.
  8. Furnishing a work place free of safety hazards and containing such safety devices and safeguards as are consistent with Labor and Industries requirements.

B. Worker Right to Know (chemical hazards)

  1. Preparing and maintaining an up-to-date list of hazardous chemicals present at each site.
  2. Labeling of hazardous chemicals at each site.
  3. Photocopying or purchasing any required hazard warnings.
  4. 4. Replacing missing, unreadable, or incorrect labels.
  5. Requiring Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all incoming chemicals.
  6.  Maintaining current MSDS files and distributing to supervisors.
  7. Maintaining easily accessible MSDS files, and making MSDS’s available to staff members.
  8. Training staff members at time of initial assignment or whenever a new hazard is introduced.
  9. Preparing a training manual which immediate supervisors can use to create training sessions specific to their site.
  10. Maintaining records which show that employees have received training and information.


6512—INFECTION CONTROL PROGRAM

In order to safeguard the school community from the spread of certain vaccine-preventable diseases and in recognition that prevention is a means of combating the spread of disease, the board strongly urges that school staff members (including volunteers) provide documentation of immunization or evidence of immunity against certain vaccine-preventable diseases. The following immunizations are recommended for school staff: measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), varicella (chickenpox), diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (Tdap and Td), and influenza (flu). Staff members born prior to January 1, 1957 need not provide evidence of immunity to measles; these individuals are considered naturally immune.

To facilitate this prevention program, the board authorizes the superintendent to make arrangements for staff immunization at a convenient time and place, and at a nominal cost to the staff member. A “susceptible” staff member may be exempted from one or more of the immunizations recommended for school staff by the Washington Department of Health by filing a written objection to such immunization on the basis of religious or philosophical grounds, when a private physician certifies that the staff member’s physical condition contraindicates immunization or when the staff member provides documentation of immunity by blood test.

In the event of an outbreak of a vaccine-preventable disease in school, the local health officer has the authority to exclude a susceptible staff member. A staff member granted an exemption by the district for religious, philosophical or medical reasons or without an acceptable immunization record on file may be excluded, as he/she is considered to be susceptible. If excluded, he/she is not eligible to receive sick leave benefits because of the exclusion itself. To qualify for benefits, he/she must be ill or temporarily physically-disabled, or is otherwise provided for in a collective bargaining agreement.

The superintendent or designee will evaluate all job duties of district employees to determine which employees have reasonably anticipated on-the-job exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material. The district will maintain a list of job classifications where employees have reasonably anticipated exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material. The hepatitis B vaccine will be provided at the district’s expense to all employees identified as having risk of directly contacting blood or other potentially infectious material at work.
In the event that an employee has a specific exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material, the employee will be provided, at district expense, with confidential medical evaluation, follow-up and treatment, if indicated.

The district will provide annual training to all employees with reasonably anticipated exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material. All employees will receive district provided training on HIV/AIDS within six months of initial employment.

Records will be kept in strict confidence regarding the hepatitis B vaccine status of all employees with reasonably anticipated exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material and for each occupational exposure an employee has to blood or other potentially infectious material. The records will be kept for the duration of the employee’s employment, plus thirty years. The district will also keep records that employees have received appropriate training.

Cross References:
3414 – Infectious Diseases

Legal References:
Chapter 246-110 WAC Contagious disease — School districts and day care centers
Chapter 296-823 WAC Occupation exposure to bloodborne pathogens
Chapter 392-198 WAC Training — school employees — HIV/AIDS

Management Resources:
2015 – June Issue
2015 – April Issue

Adoption Date: 9/24/15
Raymond School District #116



6512P‑PROCEDURE INFECTION CONTROL PROGRAM

Immunization

Staff members, including substitutes, student teachers and volunteers, are encouraged to complete an Immunization History form to be placed on file at the district office. In the event of an outbreak of a vaccine-preventable disease in a school, the local health officer has the authority to exclude all susceptible persons, including school staff. This authority would likely be exercised in the event of one or more cases of measles or rubella within the school. Susceptible, as related to measles, means any staff member born after January 1, 1957 who does not have documented evidence of immunity.

A staff member may claim an exemption for health, religious or philosophical reasons. However, such a staff member who files such an exemption may be excluded if an outbreak occurs at his/her school. A staff member who is excluded is not eligible to receive sick leave benefits unless he/she is ill or physically disabled or is otherwise provided for in the collective bargaining agreement.

If a staff member needs to be immunized/vaccinated, he/she should contact a personal physician or clinic. Immunizations Some vaccines may also be available at a nominal cost from the county health department.

Infection Control Program

The district’s infection control program will be consistent with WAC 296-823. Occupation exposure to bloodborne pathogens and the Guidelines for Implementation of Hepatitis B and HIV School Employee Training published by the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

All employees with reasonably anticipated on-the-job exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material will be identified. Potentially infectious human body fluids are blood, semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult to differentiate between body fluids. Examples of employees with reasonably anticipated risk of exposure include, but are not limited to, school nurses; teachers and aides in classrooms for the developmentally disabled, the institutionalized or group home residents; bus drivers of such students, or who provide first aid; communication disorders specialists for such students; coaches or assistants who provide first aid, and first aid providers. All job duties should be evaluated by the superintendent or her/his designee for the risk of exposure to blood or potentially infectious material. The district will maintain a list of job classifications with reasonably anticipated exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
All employees identified as having reasonably anticipated exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material will be offered the hepatitis B vaccine at the district’s expense.

If an employee has a specific exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material, the district will provide a free and confidential medical evaluation and follow-up performed by an appropriately trained and licensed health care professional. Any necessary post-exposure treatment will be provided.

Employees with reasonably anticipated exposure to blood and other potentially infectious material will participate in district-provided training within ten days of employment and annually before the first day of school. The training will include:

  • A general description of bloodborne diseases;
  • An explanation of modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens;
  • An explanation on the use and limitations of methods of control;
  • Information about personal protective equipment;
  • Information on the Hepatitis B vaccine;
  • A description of procedures to follow if an exposure incident occurs;
  • An explanation of signs, labels, tags and color coding used to designate biohazards;
  • Where to obtain a copy of WAC 296-823 Occupation exposure to bloodborne pathogens;
  • An explanation of the district’s infection control plan and how to obtain a copy;
  • How to identify tasks and activities that may involve exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material; and
  • Appropriate actions to take in emergencies involving blood or other potentially infectious material.

The district will provide training to all employees regarding HIV/AIDS. The training will be provided within six months of initial employment. The training will include:

  • History and epidemiology of HIV/AIDS;
  • Methods of transmission of HIV;
  • Methods of prevention of HIV infection including universal precautions for handling body fluids;
  • Current treatment for symptoms of HIV and prognosis of disease prevention;
  • State and federal laws barring discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS; and
  • State and federal laws regulating the confidentiality of a person’s HIV antibody status.

Significant new discoveries or changes in accepted knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS will be transmitted to employees within one calendar year of notification from the Superintendent of Public Instruction, unless the Department of Health notifies the district that prompter dissemination of the information is required.

The Hepatitis B vaccination status and records regarding any occupational exposure, if any, will be kept in strict confidence during employment, plus thirty years, for any employee with reasonably anticipated exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material. The records of occupational exposures will include:

  • The employee’s name and social security number;
  • The employee’s Hepatitis B vaccination status;
  • Examination results, medical testing and follow-up procedure records;
  • The healthcare professional’s written opinion; and
  • A copy of information provided to the healthcare professional.

The district will also keep records of training sessions including the dates, a summary of the material, names and qualifications of the trainers and names of employees attending the training.

These records will be kept for three years.

Adoption Date: 6/25/15
Raymond School District #116



6513—WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION

The district does not tolerate violence in the workplace and will work to prevent violent incidents from occurring by implementing a workplace violence prevention program. All employees of the district are responsible for implementing and maintaining the violence prevention program. The workplace violence prevention program establishes and requires adherence to work practices that are designed to make the workplace more secure. It also reinforces the ban on verbal threats or physical actions by employees that create a security hazard for others.

Additionally, the district does not tolerate domestic violence including harassment of any employee or other person while in the district’s buildings or vehicles, while on district property, or while engaged in school or work-related activities. The district is committed to working with employees who are victims of domestic violence to prevent abuse and harassment from occurring in the workplace. No employees will be penalized or disciplined solely for being a victim of domestic violence. The district will provide appropriate support and assistance to employees who are victims of domestic violence. Any employee who threatens, harasses, or abuses someone in the district or from their workplace using district resources such as work time, district telephones, fax machines, mail, or e-mail shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and including discharge. Corrective action or discharge may also be taken against employees who are arrested, convicted, or permanently enjoined as a result of domestic violence when such action is directly related to their position with the district.

All violent incidents shall be reported and investigated, whether or not a physical injury has occurred. There will be no discrimination against victims of workplace violence. Copies of this policy and support materials are readily available to all employees. The Superintendent or designee is directed to adopt procedures to implement this policy, including creation of the workplace violence prevention group which will: assess the district’s vulnerability to workplace violence, recommend preventive actions and employee training programs, and review the program annually for possible adjustments.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 4315 Regulation of Dangerous Weapons on School Premises
Board Policy 5255 Disciplinary Action and Discharge
Board Policy 6511 Staff Safety

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6513P—WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION

The workplace violence prevention group will consist of employees from the primary, elementary, and secondary grades, as well as from the classified work groups. If appropriate, workplace violence prevention groups shall be established at each school and major work site. The workplace violence prevention group is responsible for making recommendations in the following areas:

  • assessing district/building practices for potential hazards or improved security practices
  • efforts to inform all employees about the workplace violence prevention program
  • assuring that all employees comply with security measures
  • recognizing employees who perform work practices that promote security in the workplace
  • training and counseling programs to enhance awareness of workplace violence issues
  • including workplace violence prevention in new employee orientation
  • annual review and update of the workplace violence prevention program
  • a system for notifying the district about workplace security hazards or threats of violence
  • processes for protecting employees who report threats from possible retaliation

When possible, the district will provide the following assistance to employee victims of domestic violence: resources and referral information; work schedule adjustments or leave as needed to obtain medical, law enforcement, legal, or judicial assistance; and workplace relocation. To the extent possible the district will maintain the confidentiality of employee victims of domestic violence, while taking necessary steps to protect the workplace and other employees from possible violence.



6530—INSURANCE

All insurance programs of the district shall be managed as part of the district’s risk management program.

Liability Insurance

The district shall maintain sufficient liability insurance to protect it against claims for the negligent or wrongful acts of its staff or agents. The amount and terms of such insurance protection shall be reviewed annually as part of the district’s risk management program.

The board shall hold individual board members, administrators, staff or agents of the district harmless and defend them from any financial loss, including reasonable attorneys’ fees, arising out of any act or failure to act, provided that at the time of the act or omission complained of the individual so indemnified was acting within the scope of his/her responsibilities or employment and in compliance with the policies and procedures of the district.

The district shall provide its staff with insurance protection while they are engaged in the maintenance of order and discipline and in the protection of students, other staff and property. Such insurance protection must include liability insurance covering injury to persons and property and insurance protecting staff from loss or damage of their personal property incurred while so engaged.

A member of the board of directors or the superintendent is immune from civil liability for damages for any discretionary decision or failure to make a discretionary decision within his or her official capacity, but liability shall remain on the district for the tortious conduct of the board members and superintendent. The superintendent shall obtain errors and omissions insurance in the amounts deemed necessary by the board.

Property Damage Insurance

The district shall maintain a comprehensive insurance program which shall provide adequate coverage, as determined by the board, in the event of loss or damage to school buildings and/or equipment, including motor vehicles.

Staff Insurance

The district shall develop and maintain an effective program of insurance for its staff. Such programs may include, but are not limited to, unemployment compensation, industrial accident and/or injury insurance, liability and medical insurance.

The district may make available liability, life, health, health care, accident, disability or salary protection insurance or any one of or a combination of these types of insurance and may contribute all or part of the cost of such insurance.

Unemployment Insurance

The district shall participate in the program lawfully available for fulfilling its unemployment insurance obligation that is most financially and administratively efficient. The unemployment compensation program shall be reviewed annually by the board.

Staff eligible under the terms of the unemployment compensation pool agreement with the educational service district shall be provided with the unemployment benefits to which they are entitled. The district shall maintain the records required by the state employment security department and retain them for not less than four years.

Workers’ Compensation

Raymond is self-insured through the ESD Worker’s Compensation for the purpose of providing industrial insurance benefits to employees who sustain job-related injuries or occupational diseases. This trust has been approved by Washington State Department of Labor and Industries to administer industrial insurance benefits. Employees of a self-insured business have the same rights and responsibilities as other workers insured through the State of Washington, Employees are protected in two ways:

A. Medical costs resulting from job-related injuries or diseases are paid under the claim; and

B. Injured employees are paid a partial wage replacement while off work due to a job-related injury or disease under the claim when certified off work by their doctor.

When an employee is injured on the job and is unable to perform his or her duties as a result of an on-the-job injury or occupational disease and certified off work by a doctor, the employee may elect to use leave as follows (provided the employer does not elect to keep the employee on full salary through means other than use of accrued leave):

  • Choose unpaid leave thus receiving only his or her entitled temporary total disability (TTD) benefits, or
  • Elect to use a full day of accumulated leave (sick, annual or other similar benefit) in addition to their entitled TTD benefits, or
  • Elect to use a proportionate share of accumulated leave to make up the difference between the workers’ compensation payments and the employee’s regular pay at the time of injury.
  • The superintendent or designee will develop procedures to assure the legal administration of workers’ compensation benefits.

Medical Insurance

Medical plans are offered in the district on a payroll deduction plan. Staff may select from among those plans which are made available by the district’s approval. The district shall make a contribution toward approved insurance premiums for each full-time staff member each month in an amount which is determined each year. The district may provide prorated contributions toward premiums for less than full-time staff. In the event of any fully-funded legislative changes for payment of insurance premiums, such funds shall be provided automatically as additional contributions.

When a staff member is on leave and the staff member’s accumulated paid leave has been exhausted, the district shall notify the staff member that the medical insurance benefits are exhausted and the premium is due. The district shall accept the premium from the staff member and remit it to the carrier each month during the term of an approved leave of absence.

In compliance with COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act), the district will offer continuing health care coverage on a self-pay basis to staff members and their dependents following termination (for reasons other than gross misconduct), a reduction in hours, retirement, death, or loss of coverage eligibility to the dependent. These health benefits will be identical to the coverage offered to full-time staff members. For terminated or reduced-hour staff members, the coverage may last up to 18 months or until they become eligible for other health insurance, whichever is earlier. In the event of the staff member’s retirement, divorce, separation or death, or loss of dependent eligibility the coverage may last up to 36 months for the staff member and/or qualified beneficiary. The full policy premium plus a 2% administration fee will be paid by the staff member or the beneficiary to the district.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2151 Interscholastic Activities
Board Policy 5321 Sick Leave
Board Policy 6535 Student Insurance
Board Policy 6540 School District Responsibility for Privately Owned Property
Board Policy 6500 Risk Management

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.320.060 Officers, employees or agents of school districts or educational service districts, insurance to protect and hold personally harmless educational service districts– Defense, costs, fees—Payment of obligation
RCW 28A.335.010 School buildings, maintenance, furnishing and insuring
RCW 28A.400.350 Liability, life, health, health care, accident, disability and salary insurance authorized–Premiums
RCW 28A.400.370 Mandatory insurance protection for employees
RCW 4.24.470 Liability of officials and members of governing body of public agency
RCW 4.96.010 Tortious conduct of political sub-division–Liability for damages
RCW 41.50.160 Restoration of withdrawn contributions by annual installment
RCW 50.20.050 Disqualification for leaving work voluntarily without good cause
RCW 50.44.030(3) Insurance pools
RCW 50.44.050 Benefits payable, terms and conditions
RCW 51.32.090 Temporary total disability-partial restoration of earning power-return to available work-when employer continues wages-limitations
29 U.S.C. A §§ 1161-1168 Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act
WAC 296-15 Worker’s compensation self-insurance

Adoption Date: 7/22/10
Raymond School District #116



6535—STUDENT INSURANCE

Student accident insurance coverage shall be offered in order to keep the insurance premium within the reach of the majority of students. The superintendent is authorized to receive quotations from the various underwriters available and to recommend for board consideration the best single source of coverage. Upon approval by the board, the district shall distribute application forms and supply the necessary claims information (time of accident, cause of accident) when requested by a student or his/her parent.

To be eligible for consideration an agency and/or underwriting company must provide knowledgeable local representation to follow up problem claims, answer questions concerning coverage and procedures and expedite the entire program from the standpoint of communication among the claimant, doctor or hospital and claims office. The underwriting company, if not located in Washington, must maintain an agent within the state with authority to handle, adjust and process claims so that final claim determination shall be made within the state of Washington.

Legal Reference:

RCW 28A.400.350 Liability, life, health, health care, accident, disability and salary insurance authorized–Premiums

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6540—SCHOOL DISTRICT’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR PRIVATELY-OWNED PROPERTY

The district shall not assume responsibility for the maintenance, repair or replacement of any privately-owned property brought to a school or district function unless the use or presence of such property has been specifically requested in writing by the administration.

The district shall not make reimbursement for loss or damage to a staff member’s personal equipment or material brought to school unless evidence can be shown that it was necessary or highly desirable for use in the school program. Evidence of loss or damage must show that the loss was not due to any negligence or fault of the staff member. The following guidelines shall apply:

A. Leaving items of obvious value at the school over a weekend or vacation period should be avoided.

B. The district shall not reimburse for loss of money or personal effects.

C. The use of personal equipment for instructional purposes must have the prior approval of the principal or supervisor.

D. The staff member must verify that no personal insurance coverage is applicable to the loss or damage.

E. Claims for loss must be filed within 5 days after the damage or loss. Claimants must attest to a notary public as to the nature of the loss and the value of the item.

F. Proper documentation shall accompany the requisition for reimbursement.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6570—PROPERTY AND DATA MANAGEMENT

Data Management

The superintendent is authorized to enter into a contract with the Washington School Information Processing Cooperative to purchase a student information system, equipment, networking and software to expand the current K-12 education statewide network. The Board shall review the data management program annually.

Property Records

Property records and inventory records shall be maintained on all land, buildings and personal property under the control of the district.

Property purchased in whole or in part with federal funds shall be inventoried at least every two years. The inventory shall include the serial number of the item, its cost and the percentage of federal funds used to purchase it.

Small attractive items (computers, printers, projectors, video cassette recorders, tools, etc.) shall be inventoried annually and shall be signed out to staff. Sign-out records shall also be maintained.

At the end of each school year each teacher shall inventory the property items in his or her classroom. A randomly selected ten percent of those inventories shall be double-checked by an employee of the business office.

For purposes of this policy, “equipment” shall mean a unit of furniture or furnishings, an instrument, a machine, an apparatus or a set of articles which retains its shape and appearance with use, is nonexpendable, and does not lose its identity when incorporated into a more complex unit. Property records of facilities shall be maintained on an ongoing basis.

No equipment shall be removed for personal or non-school use. Property records shall show, as appropriate to the item recorded, the:

A. Description of the property;

B. A serial number or other identification number (equipment may be identified with a permanent tag that provides appropriate district and equipment identification.);

C. Source of property;

D. Who holds title;

E. Manufacturer;

F. Year of purchase;

G. Initial cost;

H. Percentage of federal participation in the cost of the property;

I. Location;

J. Condition and depreciation;

K. Current valuation in conformity with insurance requirements; and

L. Disposition data including date of disposal and sale price of the property

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 3231 Student Records
Board Policy 4040 Public Access to School District Records
Board Policy 6801 Fixed Assets
Board Policy 6955 Maintenance of Records

Legal References:
RCW 40.14 Preservation and Destruction of Public Records
RCW 40.14.010 Definition and classification of public records
RCW 42.56.070-080 Public Records Act – Documents and indexes to be made public; Facilities for copying – Availability of public records
34 C.F.R. § 80.32 Uniform administrative requirements for grants and cooperative agreements to state and local governments – Equipment

Management Resources:
Policy News, April 2006 Fixed Assets
Policy News, April 2005 Records Retention Schedule Updated

Adoption Date: 04/22/2010
Raymond School District #116



6570P—RECORDS MANAGEMENT

The district records officer shall have the responsibility for the safekeeping of all records according to the retention schedule cited below. The district records officer shall have authority to dispose of materials after the recommended retention period.

Official public records have a statutory minimum retention of 6 years. The retention period for office files and memoranda is based on operational requirements for each office. Whenever applicable, the retention period starts with the “cut-off.” “Cut-off” is a term used to indicate files or records may be terminated on a predetermined date. “Cut-off” prevents current records from attaining unmanageable size and facilitates the filing of new records. Calendar year records may be “cut-off” on December 31, and a new file established on January l; all fiscal year records can be “cut-off” only upon the completion of an action or event, such as termination of contract, final payment of a contract, termination of employment, etc. Regardless of the duration of the retention period, records series should be kept in office files after “cut-off” only as long as is necessary to satisfy (l) active reference, (2) audit, when required, and (3) other operational requirements. Once these three factors have been satisfied, the records should be transferred to a records center for the remainder of the retention period.

The retention period shall be as follows:

Student Records

  • Student permanent record: Permanent
  • Cumulative record: 5 years after graduation or withdrawal from high school
  • Confidential reports and records: 5 years after graduation or withdrawal from high school
  • Special services records: 5 years after graduation or service has been terminated
  • Student discipline records: 2 years

Teacher Records

  • Elementary teacher grade books: 3 years
  • Secondary teacher grade books: 5 years after graduation
  • Lesson plan books: 1 year
  • Faculty handbook: Until superseded

Individual Schools

  • Attendance card: 3 years
  • Daily attendance report: Until after audit
  • Field trip authorization (parent): 1 year
  • Use of private vehicles: 1 year

Food Services

  • Cafeteria receipt books: 6 years
  • Daily lunch and milk count report: 3 years
  • Free or reduced price lunch applications: 3 years
  • Meal ticket log: 3 years
  • Purchase orders: 6 years
  • Reimbursement claims: 6 years
  • Revenue and expenditure ledger: 6 years
  • Time cards: 6 years

Health Office

  • Accident injury report: 5 years after child’s 2lst birthday
  • Medication request: 5 years
  • Student health card: Until graduation

Maintenance

  • Engineering & architectural drawings: As long as district retains property
  • Maintenance folder on building: 6 years
  • Work order request: 6 years
  • Mileage claim form: 6 years
  • Vandalism report: 3 years
  • Laundry checklist: 6 years
  • Boiler vessel record: Until boiler is disposed of
  • Budget request: 2 years
  • Rental of school facilities: 3 years

Transportation

  • Bus fuel reports: 2 years
  • Bus schedules: 4 years
  • Employee time sheet: 2 years
  • Bus time sheet: 4 years
  • Transportation reports: 3 years
  • Purchase orders: 6 years
  • Accident reports: 3 years
  • Transportation requests: 6 years

Accounting Services

  • Cancelled checks: 6 years
  • Check register: 6 years
  • Voucher forms: 6 years (used as claims and supporting invoices)
  • Consultant contracts: 6 years
  • Purchase order: 6 years
  • Warrant registers: 6 years
  • Record of part-time students: Until after audit
  • Classroom count report: Until after audit
  • Records supporting ESEA Title I & Title III claims: 5 years
  • Records supporting NDEA Title Va, ESEA Title II claims: 3 years
  • Textbook and library book inventories: Useful life of each item
  • Cash receipts transmittal forms: 6 years
  • Monthly transmittal of district receipts: 3 years
  • District invoice: 6 years
  • Trial balances: 3 years
  • Receipt books: 6 years
  • County Treasurer Financial Reports: 6 years
  • State apportionment: 6 years
  • Banking records: 6 years
  • State Auditor’s Reports: 5 years
  • General ledger: 6 years
  • Deposit slips: Until after audit

Personnel Services

  • Employee file: 6 years
  • Employment interview forms: 2 years
  • Employment requisition: 2 years
  • Letters of resignation: 6 years
  • Absence record: 6 years
  • Employee history card: 6 years
  • Application for employment: 6 years (hired), 2 years (non-hired)
  • Letters of recommendation: Termination plus 6 years
  • Employee contracts: 6 years
  • Professional credit application: 6 years
  • Title IX and affirmative action surveys: 6 years

District Payroll

  • Employee record: 6 years after termination
  • Personnel pay history: record Permanent
  • Personnel action form: 6 years after termination
  • Time cards: Until after audit
  • Payroll work report: 6 years
  • Teacher sub report: 6 years
  • Payroll warrant register: 6 years
  • Warrant request form: 6 years
  • Tax sheltered agreements: 4 years after expiration
  • Jury or military service agreements: 6 years
  • Garnishments: 6 years
  • Retirement forms: 6 years
  • Labor & industry quarterly report: 6 years
  • Medical insurance listings: 6 years
  • Payroll deductions: Until termination
  • Labor & industries accident claims: Permanent
  • Federal tax returns: 4 years

Budget Services

  • Final budget: Permanent
  • Annual report of school funds: 6 years
  • Monthly financial reports to board: Permanent
  • Budget status report: 2 years

Purchasing

  • Bids and formal quotes: 6 years
  • Purchasing requisition: 3 years
  • Purchase orders: 6 years
  • Inventory list of district property: 6 years after superseded

District

  • Copies of board minutes and resolutions: Permanent
  • Verbatim transcripts of meetings: 6 years
  • Associated Student Body Audits: 5 years
  • Banking records: 6 years
  • Minutes of meetings: Permanent
  • Purchase authorizations: 6 years
  • Receipts: 6 years
  • Invoices: 6 years
  • Vouchers: 6 years
  • General ledger: 6 years
  • Warrants: 6 years
  • Budgets: Permanent


6600—TRANSPORTATION

The district may provide transportation to and from school for a student:

A. Whose residence is beyond the one-mile radius from the school to which the student is assigned;

B. Whose walking route to school is hazardous;

C. Whose disability prevents him/her from walking or providing for his/her own welfare while walking; or

D. Who has another compelling and legally sufficient reason to receive transportation services. The parent or guardian of a student whose assigned bus stop is beyond the maximum walking distance may receive reimbursement for private transportation at the state mileage reimbursement rate.

Each year the superintendent shall present to the board for the number of students who are transported who live within the minimum distance of their schools and for whom there appears sufficient justification for the district to provide transportation. In this report, the superintendent shall also provide the reasons why each of these students is transported.

The district’s transportation program shall comply in all ways with state law and regulation. Transportation services of the district may include approved bus routes, district-approved field trips, school activities (participants only) and extracurricular activities (rooters). The superintendent is authorized to permit a parent of a student enrolled in school to ride a bus when excess seating is available and private or other public transportation is not reasonably available.

The board of directors may authorize children attending an approved private school to ride a school bus provided that the bus route and stops are not altered, space is available, and a fee to cover the per seat cost for such transportation is collected.

Routes and Schedules

The superintendent or his/her designee shall be responsible for scheduling bus transportation, including the determination of routes and bus stops as well as overseeing the transportation program.

The purpose of bus scheduling and routing is to achieve maximum service with a minimum fleet of buses insofar as this is consistent with rendering safe and reasonably equal service to all students entitled to such service. The board may authorize the use of a district-owned passenger car in lieu of a bus for transporting students to and from school.

In order to operate the transportation system as safely and efficiently as possible, the following factors shall be considered in establishing bus routes:

A. Where an alternate route may be considered without sacrifice of efficiency or economy, preference shall be given by the transportation supervisor to that route more directly serving the largest number of students.

B. The transportation supervisor will determine location of bus stops by such factors as student safety, economy and efficiency. Students may be required to walk up to one mile from their home to their bus stop provided that the walking route is safe.

The district shall apply for state transportation apportionment funds and shall maintain the records required to obtain such funding.

Emergency Routes and Schedules

The district shall develop emergency bus routes and schedules to be used when weather conditions make the usual routes impassable or, in the superintendent’s judgment, too hazardous. The transportation department will call parents and the radio station regarding emergency routes as needed.

If roads are closed to buses but not to private vehicles, the district may continue to operate the instructional programs of the schools without providing bus transportation until the roads are again open to buses.

Legal References:
RCW 28A..160 Student transportation
RCW 28A.160.020 Authorization for private school students to ride buses— Conditions
RCW 28A.160.030 Authorizing individual transportation or other arrangements
WAC 392-141 Transportation – State allocation for operations
WAC 392-172-204 Transportation (Special Education)
WAC 392-172-035 Definitions of “free appropriate, public education,” “adult student,” “special education student,” “parent,” and “public agency”

Adoption Date: 03/23/2006
Raymond School District #116



6580‑CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS PLAN

The Board of Directors recognizes that in the event of a natural disaster, the District’s restoration of the safe learning environment across a wide range of hazards is critical for students, staff and the community at large. The Board further recognizes that a continuity of operations (COOP) plan will ensure that disruptions to operations are reduced or minimized, recovery is timely and that the safe learning environment is reconstituted at the earliest opportunity.

To this end, the District will implement and maintain a COOP plan with the following objectives:

  • Ensure the safety of students and staff;
  • Ensure the continuous performance of essential functions/operations following a natural disaster;
  • Protect essential facilities, equipment, records and other assets;
  • Reduce or mitigate disruptions to operations/education programs;
  • Reduce the loss of life;
  • Minimize damage and other losses;
  • Identify and designate principals, support staff and students to be relocated;
  • Facilitate decision making for plan execution and the subsequent conduct of operations; and
  • Achieve a timely and orderly recovery from the event and resumption of full educational services to all students and staff.

The COOP plan will address or include, but not be limited to:

  • Guidance on infrastructure recovery developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Washington Emergency Management Agency (WEMA);
  • An infrastructure recovery checklist that the District can use to restore its essential physical and organizational structures, services and facilities;
  • A list of offices or divisions of state agencies that the District may contact for assistance with infrastructure recovery after a natural disaster;
  • A list of state and federal emergency funding sources that the District may contact for assistance.

The Superintendent is authorized to implement procedures to support this policy.

Cross References:
3432 – Emergencies
4000 – Public Information Program
4040 – Public Access to District Records
6955 – Maintenance of Facilities Records

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.125 Safe school plans – Requirements- Duties of school districts, schools, and educational service districts – Reports –Drills-Rules.
RCW 38.52.010 Definitions
Engrossed House Bill 1003, Chapter 37, Laws of 2016 [not codified]

Management Resources:
2017 – July Issue
Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) School COOP Fact Sheet

Adoption Date: 11/21/17
Raymond School District #116



6580P‑CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS PLAN

Preparation for a natural disaster

The District will develop its COOP plan using the OSPI School Safety Center Model COOP plan. The District’s COOP plan will be an annex to the District’s Safe School Plan, which is required under RCW 28A.320.125 to address emergency mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

Response to a natural disaster

The District may contact the following offices or divisions of state agencies for assistance and/or information:

OSPI School Safety Center
State of Washington Emergency Management Division (WEMA)
State E911 Coordinators (by county)
Washington State Department of Health

The District may contact the following offices or divisions of federal agencies for assistance and/or information:

U.S. Department of Education
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Fire Management Assistance Grant Programs (FMAG)
Ready.gov
Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools
National Weather Service

Federal Student Aid

State and federal emergency funding sources

State

See also required forms for all grants managed by Washington Emergency Management Division.

Federal



6600P—ROUTE GUIDELINES

Routes should be established so as to:

  • Avoid, whenever possible, left-hand turns when entering or exiting high speed roadways.
  • Avoid students crossing a four-lane road.
  • Minimize stopping on multi-lane roads, unless the bus can get completely off the road.
  • Avoid, if possible, crossing railroad tracks.
  • Provide transportation to students who live within the distance specified for state funding from school or who would have to walk on a roadway declared unsafe by the board.
  • Deliver students to their school no more than thirty (30) minutes before school starts. NOTE: It is desired that students arrive at school within five (5) to ten (10) minutes of starting time.
  • Pick up students at school within five (5) minutes of dismissal, unless a delay is caused by a double run, or another guideline. In that case, students should be picked up within no more than thirty (30) minutes.
  • Allow for a minimum “dead head” time between and to runs and no more than fifteen (15) minutes standby time between runs, provided that unless approved by the superintendent, all waiting time shall be on school property.
  • Avoid travel on dead end roads, unless it is necessary within these guidelines and there is an ample, safe area in which a bus can turn around, without backing.
  • Fill each bus to rated capacity, provided that it is economically feasible and within the other routing guidelines.
  • Have minimum overlap or duplication in bus routes serving the same school.
  • Avoid travel on private roads, drives or property and on unimproved roads (not surfaced to county/city standards) or roads which are in such bad condition as to cause damage to a bus.

Bus Stop Guidelines

Bus stops shall be established which:

  • Are frequent enough so students do not have to walk more than one (1) mile to and from the bus. Bus stops may be more frequent when the road has been declared unsafe for walking.
  • Are located where students can stand a safe distance from the road.
  • Allow, where possible, the bus to get completely off of the road.
  • Provide at least 500 feet on 35-mile-per-hour roadways, and 800 feet on 50-mile-per-hour roadways of unobstructed visibility, both ways.
  • Require as few students as possible to cross roadways with no students crossing multiple lane roads and highways.
  • Are located where no damage is likely to occur to private property and where the number of students waiting does not create unsafe conditions and/or situations.


6605—STUDENT SAFETY WALKING, BIKING AND RIDING BUSES TO SCHOOL

The district will adopt a comprehensive school trip safety program that addresses, bus safety, walking and biking route plans, vehicle access to the school, circulation and parking at the school, pedestrian circulation on and around the school campus and safety education and enforcement.

Safety Advisory Committee

The superintendent will establish a Safety Advisory Committee (SAC) pursuant to WAC 392-151-017 to develop and maintain a comprehensive school trip safety program and review and approve each school’s Safe Routes To School plan. The superintendent will develop specific responsibilities and reporting relationships of the committee, including how the SAC relates to individual school safety programs.

Bus Safety

The superintendent will develop written rules establishing the procedures for bus safety and emergency exit drills and for student conduct while riding on buses.  The procedures for bus safety will include rules restricting bus access to students and those persons authorized by the superintendent and/or his or her designee(s) to ride the bus to and from any school activity.

The bus driver is responsible for the safety of his/her passengers, particularly for those who cross a roadway after leaving the bus. No bus driver will order or allow a student to disembark at other than his/her customary boarding or alighting place unless so authorized by the superintendent. In order to assure the safety of all, the bus driver may hold students accountable for their conduct during the course of transportation and may recommend corrective action against a student. Bus drivers are expressly prohibited from using corporal punishment. Bus drivers are expressly prohibited from allowing anyone to board the bus who is not a student or a person authorized to ride the bus by the superintendent and/or his or her designee(s).

Emergencies
In the event of an accident or other emergency, the bus driver will follow the emergency procedures in accordance with the School Bus Driver Handbook (SPI). A copy of the emergency procedures will be located in each bus. To insure the success of such emergency procedures, each bus driver will conduct an emergency evacuation drill within the first six weeks of each school semester. The district will conduct such other drills and procedures as may be necessary.

Student Conduct on Buses
The superintendent will establish written rules of conduct for students riding school buses. Such rules will include as a minimum the requirements of WAC 392-145-021 and will be reviewed annually by the superintendent and revised if necessary. If the rules are substantially revised, they will be submitted to the board for approval.

At the beginning of each school year, a copy of the rules of conduct for students riding buses will be provided to each student who is scheduled to ride a school bus. The classroom teacher and/or bus driver will review the rules with the students at or near the beginning of each school year. A copy of the rules will be available upon request at the district office.

Safe Routes To School Plan
Pursuant to WAC 392-151-025, all elementary schools that have students who walk to and from school are required to develop a suggested route plan. All schools are encouraged to have a walking/biking route plan in place. To develop the school walking/biking route plans, the superintendent will establish a Safe Routes to School committee.

The committee will conduct a walking and biking audit within a one mile radius of the school and develop a Safe Routes To School walking/biking map or plan. The plan will recommend the best routes for students walking to and from school, as well as the best routes to and from school bus stops. In developing the plan, the committee will consider, at a minimum, the following:

  • traffic patterns;
  • existing traffic controls;
  • existing school patrols;
  • limits on the number of school crossings so that students have to move through the crossings in groups;
  • allowing only one entrance-exit from each block to and from school;
  • routes that provide the greatest physical separation between walking children and traffic;
  • routes that expose students to the lowest speeds and volumes of moving vehicles; and
  • routes that include the fewest number of road or rail crossings;

The superintendent or designee will review the plan with the Safety Advisory Committee and, upon its approval, distribute the plan to all students with instructions that it be taken home and discussed with parents. The plan will be routinely updated as conditions change. The superintendent or designee will include the plan in the district’s School Wellness Plan to encourage parents and students who walk and bike to school to use the recommended routes.

Cross References:
3241 – Classroom Management, Corrective Actions Or Punishment
6700 – Nutrition and Physical Fitness

Legal References:
RCW 28A.600.010 Enforcement of rules of conduct — Due process guarantees — Computation of days for short-term and long-term suspensions
RCW 46.61.385 – School patrol – Appointment –Authority –Finance—Insurance
WAC 392-144 School Bus Driver Qualifications
WAC 392-145-016 Rules for students riding school buses
WAC 392-145-021 General operating requirements
WAC 392-151-017 Safety advisory committee – Selection
WAC 392-151-025 Route plans.
WAC 392-400-225 School district rules defining misconduct — Distribution of rules

Management Resources:
2014 – June Policy & Legal News Issue
The SRTS National Partnership Local Policy Guide

Adoption Date: 09/25/14
Raymond School District #116



6605P—STUDENT CONDUCT ON BUSES

Any misconduct by a student, which in the opinion of the bus driver or bus supervisor, is detrimental to the safe operation of the bus shall be sufficient cause for the principal to suspend the transportation privilege.

Rules of conduct for students riding buses:

  • Students shall obey the driver and any aide assigned to the bus by the district. The driver is in full charge of the bus and passengers and shall be obeyed. If an aide is assigned to the bus by the district, he/she shall be responsible for the safe operation of the bus. When transporting classes or teams, the teacher or coach shall be primarily responsible for the behavior of the students.
  • Students shall obey both the driver and the teacher, coach or other staff member.
  • Students shall ride only on their assigned bus unless written permission to do otherwise has been received by school officials.
  • Students shall not be permitted to leave the bus except at their regular stop unless written permission to do otherwise is received by school officials.
  • Students assigned seats shall use only that seat unless permission to change is authorized by the driver.
  • Students shall observe rules of classroom conduct while riding on buses. Noise shall be kept down to avoid distracting the driver. Students shall refrain from the use of obscene language or gestures.
  • Students shall not smoke or ignite lighters or matches on buses.
  • Students shall not eat on buses, except when specifically authorized and supervised by an accompanying teacher, coach or other staff member. Buses shall be kept clean.
  • Students shall not open bus windows without the driver’s permission.
  • Students shall not extend any part of their body out of bus windows at any time.
  • Students shall not carry or have in their possession items that can cause injury to passengers on the bus. Such items include, but are not limited to, sticks, breakable containers, weapons or firearms, straps or pins protruding from clothing, large, bulky items which cannot be held or placed between legs, etc. Books and personal belongings shall be kept out of aisles.
  • Students shall not have animals on buses, except providing assistance to a disabled student.
  • Students shall not sit in the driver’s seat or to the immediate right or left of the driver.
  • Students shall refrain from talking to the driver unless necessary.
  • Students shall go directly to a seat once inside the bus and remain seated at all times unless the driver instructs otherwise.
  • Students shall get on/off the bus in an orderly manner and shall obey the instructions of the driver or school safety patrolmen on duty. There shall be no pushing and shoving when boarding or leaving the bus. Once off the bus, students shall adhere to rules for pedestrians.
  • Students shall never cross the roadway behind a bus unless they use pedestrian crosswalks or traffic lights.
  • Students shall stand away from the roadway curb when any bus is approaching or leaving a stop.
  • Students going to and from their bus stops where there are no sidewalks shall walk on the left-hand side of the roadway facing oncoming traffic. Students shall go directly to their home after leaving the bus.
  • Students shall use lap belts on buses when available.
  • Students shall follow emergency exit drill procedures as prescribed by the driver.
  • Students shall not tamper with emergency doors or equipment.
  • Students shall remain quietly seated, not exhibit disruptive behavior and turn off all noise- making devices at highway rail grade crossings.
  • Parents of students identified as causing damage to buses shall be charged with the cost of the incurred damage. Students causing the damage may be suspended from transportation.
  • Student misconduct shall constitute sufficient reason for suspending transportation privileges.

Disciplinary Procedures

Principals are responsible for correcting students whose abusive behavior results in a bus-incident report or violates the rules above. The principal shall provide supervision during bus arrival and departure times and receive reports (written and oral) from the drivers.

The principal shall insure that students comply with the specified regulations. Principals must maintain open lines of communication among school officials, bus drivers and the transportation department.

When waiting for a bus, or going to and from a bus stop, students are responsible for conducting themselves according to the social and legal mores that apply to adults in public. That is, they must not abuse or cause damage to private or public property; they must not use obscene language or gestures; they must not engage in criminal activity. Failure to adhere to theses standards may result in formal complaints by citizens, which may be forwarded to principals for possible corrective action.

Students provided with transportation are responsible for complying with the district’s rules of conduct for students riding buses. Failure to adhere to these rules, or abusive behavior towards the public, driver, fellow passengers or the vehicle constitutes justification for initiating corrective action against a student.

Abusive behavior on the part of a student riding a bus may result in a written report when, in the opinion of the driver or bus supervisor, there has been an infraction of the rules applicable to student conduct. The written report is the primary means by which a driver or bus supervisor communicates a student’s conduct to the school and transportation department. This report, in most cases, reflects an infraction of rules, which is repeated by the student after his/her having received previous oral warnings from the driver or bus supervisor. In order for drivers and bus supervisors to effectively maintain control on their buses, it is expected that action be exercised by principals when receiving such a report.

When a student’s conduct constitutes an infraction of the rules, the driver or bus supervisor shall complete a report on the student describing the incident or damage that occurred. The driver or bus supervisor shall provide the student with a copy of the report, hand the original report to the principal and submit a copy to the transportation supervisor. The copy of the report concerning special education students shall be given to the principal for disposition.

The principal upon receiving the report shall investigate the circumstances surrounding the incident and take action according to the procedures set forth in the district’s policies pertaining to corrective action and punishment. When investigating the incident, the primary concern must be with respect to the safe transport of students. Corrective action, if necessary, should be consistent throughout the district as follows:

Warning: When a student’s misconduct is of a minor nature, which does not jeopardize the safety or welfare of other students or the operation of the bus.
Suspension: When a student’s misconduct is deemed to jeopardize the safety of bus passengers and operation, or when repeated warning notices fail to correct abusive behavior, or when a student incurs damage to the bus.
Expulsion: When a student’s misconduct is of such nature that the safety of the bus operation and/or of the occupants was willfully and seriously threatened (i.e., student assaulting the driver).

The action taken by the principal shall be annotated on the report and forwarded to the student’s parent for signature. The transportation department shall be notified.

Drivers shall be advised to file assault and battery charges against students who physically assault them. Under no circumstances shall the driver retaliate in kind and physically assault the student as this conduct may subject him/her to legal action.

The student or parent of a student who has been suspended from receiving transportation entitlements may appeal the principal’s decision by submitting a written statement to the superintendent. The superintendent shall render a decision after evaluating the issues and facts involved. If the decision is based on issues unrelated to those described in the district’s rules of conduct for students riding buses, the decision shall require board concurrence before implementation.

Emergencies

The transportation supervisor shall review the contents of the School Bus Driver’s Handbook with each driver prior to the beginning of each school year. Each driver, in turn, is expected to follow the procedure as outlined in the handbook. At the start of each field trip or extracurricular trip, the school bus driver shall review with all passengers the location and use of the emergency exits, emergency equipment and any district emergency procedures.

In the event of an accident, the driver shall make contact with the transportation supervisor who shall:

  • determine the nature of the accident;
  • contact emergency services if there is reason to believe that there are injuries which require immediate attention;
  • contact the State Patrol regarding the accident;
  • advise the superintendent of schools;
  • investigate the accident and gather the names of all students and witnesses;
  • dispatch another bus to transport the student to their destination;
  • contact the parent(s) or guardian(s) of any students who are injured.

To facilitate the responsibilities assigned to the transportation department, the supervisor, in cooperation with the building principals, will compile a list of students, including addresses and phone numbers, that are authorized to ride each bus route.

Updated: 09/25/14
Raymond School District #116



6608—VIDEO CAMERAS ON SCHOOL BUSES

The board authorizes the use of video cameras on district-operated school buses for the purpose of reducing discipline problems, thus providing a safer environment for the transportation of students. The reason for recording the transportation environment is to provide school officials, drivers and parents/guardians/custodians with documentation when dealing with inappropriate student behavior. Disciplinary action will be in accordance with policies and procedures on Student Responsibilities and Rights.

The superintendent shall prepare procedures for use of the video equipment on buses, the authorized review process for videotapes and the proper disposal of tapes.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6608P—VIDEO CAMERAS ON BUSES

Placement of Cameras:

Cameras shall be authorized for use in buses by the supervisor of transportation. The bus driver shall be notified of the placement in his/her bus.

Drivers may request that a camera be placed in their buses. The supervisor of transportation shall discuss the reason for the request with the driver and shall decide if and when a camera shall be placed in the bus by special request.

Building principals may request the supervisor of transportation to authorize placement of a video camera in a bus when they have reason to believe that a problem exists.

All buses where cameras may be utilized shall have signs notifying riders that video cameras may be in use.

Use of the Recorded Tapes:

When the bus returns to the garage, the transportation department foreman/mechanic or supervisor shall remove the tape and retain it in a secure location for up to five (5) working days unless it is needed to support a disciplinary action.

The bus driver shall be reminded that the camera was on his/her bus. If the driver wishes to view the tape, a time shall be set for this purpose.

The transportation supervisor may view the tape with or without the driver.

If a serious or flagrant violation of student bus rules is observed or if there is a continued violation, despite intervention, standard disciplinary action may be taken. Lesser violations shall be brought to the attention of the student and proper conduct shall be explained.

Any time a tape is to be used to support a disciplinary action, the tape shall be dated, labeled and kept on file at the transportation department office for as long as deemed necessary.

Tapes not used to support disciplinary action shall be reused.

When a tape is used to support disciplinary action, the student or the student’s parent/guardian/custodian may request to view the video. A viewing shall be arranged at the student’s school or the transportation department office.

A building principal or designee may request viewing of films through the transportation supervisor.

The supervisor of transportation may use videos to assist drivers with student behavior management skills.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

6610—VIDEO SURVEILLANCE

The board authorizes the use of video surveillance on district property for the purpose of maintaining the health, welfare, and safety of students, staff, and visitors, and to protect district equipment and facilities. The board authorizes video surveillance in common areas on district property and further authorizes the superintendent or designee to determine exact locations for cameras. The board further authorizes the superintendent or designee to install cameras to address specific incidents or need. However, the district will not install or use cameras in restrooms and locker rooms.

In general, only those individuals with a legitimate administrative or educational purpose may be permitted to view the video recordings. In most instances, those persons will be the superintendent, principals, supervisors, and other administrators.

The district will notify staff and students through [insert method of notification, for example, website, handbooks, etc.] that video surveillance may occur on district property. The district may use footage from video surveillance for student disciplinary action. In addition, the district reserves the right to use footage from video surveillance for staff discipline or discharge, although this is not the primary purpose of video surveillance.

In certain instances, video recordings may become a part of a student’s educational record or a staff member’s personnel record. The district will comply with all applicable state and federal laws related to record maintenance, retention, and disclosure.

Legal References:

42 U.S.C. 1232g Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

Management Resources:

2018 – August Issue

Adoption Date: 10/25/18



6620—SPECIAL TRANSPORTATION

The following uses of district transportation are a privilege, not a right, and, except where bound by the terms of a lease, the district may revoke that privilege through official board action at a regularly scheduled and legally advertised meeting. The superintendent shall have the authority to modify transportation services for school and extracurricular activities when the available fuel supply for regular transportation services appears to fall below the required level. Any staff member may deny transportation to any student who violates the district’s written rules and regulations.

School Activities. Transportation may be provided by the district for all activities which have been officially designated by the board as school activities. Activities may include, but not be limited to:

  • Educational field trips growing out of regular classroom activity which are planned by the teacher, approved by the principal and supervised by school staff, provided that any overnight trip or any trip beyond a 400 mile radius of the district requires prior approval of the board; and
  • Athletics, debate, drama or music programs or other board-approved co-curricular programs.

Participants in any other activity who feel such activity should be considered an official school activity may petition the board, through the superintendent, to have it considered as a school activity.

Extracurricular Activities. The superintendent may authorize the use of district transportation vehicles transporting nonparticipating students to extracurricular activities. Such vehicles may be so used when the users pay an amount sufficient to reimburse the district for the complete cost of such use. District drivers shall be used on all such trips. Participants shall be supervised by staff.

Leasing of Buses. The board may enter into a written lease agreement with any of the following:

  • A nonprofit organization transporting handicapped children and/or persons at least 60 years of age to and from the site of activities or programs deemed beneficial to such persons by such organizations, provided that commercial bus service is not reasonably available for such purpose;
  • A governmental agency transporting personnel, supplies and/or evacuees in the event of a major forest fire, flood or other natural disaster;
  • A user conducting an educational recreation program supported wholly or in part by tax funds.

Such a lease agreement shall contain a clause absolving the district of any and all liability arising from the lessee’s use and operation of the district’s buses and a clause requiring the lessee to maintain adequate insurance to recompense the district for the potential loss of the buses leased. Potential users shall stipulate in writing that commercial or charter bus service is not reasonably available to provide the services for which a school bus is needed. The user shall reimburse the district for the actual costs plus a reasonable fee for use of the bus. Funds derived from the lease of a surplus bus shall be deposited in the transportation vehicle fund. If a bus is a part of the regular fleet, the funds derived from a rental or lease agreement may be deposited in the general fund.

Cooperative Programs. The board may enter into cooperative transportation agreements with other districts when it is economically advantageous to the cooperating districts and when it does not impair the quality of educational programs available to students.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2320 Field Trips
Board Policy 6112 Rental or Lease of District Property
Board Policy 6605 Student Safety Walking to School and Riding Buses

Legal References:
RCW 28A.160.010 Operation of student transportation program – responsibility of local district
RCW 28A.160.040 Lease of buses to transport children with disabilities
RCW 28A.160.070 Lease of buses to transport handicapped children and elderly—Elderly persons defined–Program limitation
RCW 28A.160.080 School buses, rental or lease for emergency purposes-

Authorization
RCW 28A.160.100 School buses, transportation of general public to interscholastic activities – Limitations
RCW 28A.160.120 Agreements with other governmental entities for transportation of public or other non-common school purposes—Limitations
RCW 28A.335.060 Surplus school property, rental, lease or use of–Disposition of moneys received from
WAC 180-20-106 School bus operation for extracurricular use

Adoption Date: 03/23/2006
Raymond School District #116



6625—PRIVATE VEHICLE TRANSPORTATION

The board authorizes the use of private vehicles under the following circumstances:

  • Under unusual circumstances, the district may request parents, or a responsible adult, to drive children to school in their own vehicles on a per-mile cost reimbursable basis. The transportation department determines when “in-lieu” transportation would be advantageous to the district and arranges its implementation. In cases where car pools are formed by families, reimbursement shall be provided only to the parent whose car is used to transport the students to school.
  • Upon written approval of the principal, staff may transport students when a student’s welfare is involved; when due care dictates prompt action, when engaged in occasional field trip activity or when engaged in an occasional extracurricular activity. The staff member shall acknowledge that he/she agrees to assume full responsibility for any liability or property damage, comprehensive or collision, made by or against the driver/owner of the vehicle. The district’s liability insurance shall cover the risk assumed by the district. The mileage of the staff member shall be reimbursed by the district.

The superintendent shall establish procedures for the use of private auto transportation.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.160.030 Authorizing individual transportation or other arrangements–
WAC 392-143-070 Other vehicles used to transport students

Adoption Date: 03/23/2006
Raymond School District #116

RAYMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT

Consent to Use Private Transportation

I/WE, the undersigned parent of__________________________, realizing

school transportation is not provided, expressly request my/our child be permitted

to travel in a private automobile for the purpose of attending

________________________________________________________________

on ________________(date) between the hours of _____________and

________________. The private automobile is owned by

__________________and will be operated by_____________________.

Owner/Operator is covered by $_________________through_____________

insurance Company.

I/We further acknowledge that the district and its employees will have no

responsibility to supervise the transportation of my/our child to and from the

aforementioned activity nor to exercise supervision and control over the child

while not attending the aforementioned activity.

Dated this _______________day of______________, 20_____

____________________________

Parent/Guardian

_____________________________

Parent/Guardian



6630—DRIVER TRAINING AND RESPONSIBILITY

Driver Training and Responsibility

School bus drivers will observe all state statutes and regulations governing traffic safety and school bus operation. The district will, at the beginning of each school year, provide each school bus driver a copy of: (a) the OSPI School Bus Driver Handbook; (b) the district’s policy and procedure on the prohibition of harassment, intimidation and bullying; (c) all state and local rules and regulations pertaining to the operation of a school bus; and (d) the district’s written rules for student conduct on buses.

Bus Driver Qualifications
School bus drivers shall meet the qualification requirements established by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction and applicable state and federal law.

General School Bus Driver Requirements
School bus drivers shall: (a) wear a properly adjusted seat belt whenever the school bus is in motion; (b) immediately report any suspected malfunction or needed repair of the school bus in their charge; (c) only allow individuals authorized under the provisions of chapter 392-144 WAC to operate the school bus with passengers on board. No person except the driver shall be allowed to sit in the driver’s seat; (d) Except in accordance with district policy no school bus driver shall leave the driver’s seat without first securing the school bus by setting the parking brake, placing the transmission in the manufacturer’s recommended position, shutting off the engine, and removing the key from the ignition switch. The keys shall be kept in the driver’s or other authorized school official’s possession; (e) All school bus drivers shall meet the qualifications established in chapter 392-144 WAC prior to transporting students; (f) Except in accordance with district policy, a school bus driver shall not use a personal electronic device for personal communications while operating a school bus, except for the use of such devices to report illegal activity, summon medical or other emergency help, or prevent injury to a person or property, as permitted under RCW 46.61.667. For the purpose of this section, operating a school bus is defined as when the school bus engine is running; and (g) Except in accordance with district policy, a school bus driver shall not distribute anything edible to students riding the bus.

Supervision of Students
When a teacher, coach or other staff member is assigned to accompany students on a school bus, such person will be responsible for the behavior of the students in his/her charge and will ensure that passengers comply with state rules and district policies and procedures for student transportation. However, the bus driver will have final authority and responsibility.

Charter Buses or Excursion Carriers or Subcontracted Carriers
Every contract between the district and a charter bus carrier or excursion carrier, or subcontracted carrier shall require a carrier profile report indicating a satisfactory rating from the Washington utilities and transportation commission before any service is provided. Supervision of children on trips under this subsection shall be designated to a specific employee of the district who shall ensure that the driver shall have not have unsupervised access to students during the trip.

Cross References: 6690 – Contracting for Transportation Services

Legal References: RCW 28A.160.210 School bus drivers — Training and qualifications — Rules
Chapter 46.25 RCW Uniform Commercial Driver’s License Act
Chapter 392-144 WAC School Bus Driver Qualifications
WAC 392-145-011 School district requirements
WAC 392-145-016 Rules for students riding school buses
WAC 392-145-021 General operating requirements
WAC 392-145-031 General school bus driver requirements
49 CFR 382 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Controlled Substances and Alcohol Use and Testing

Management Resources: 2018 – August Issue
Policy News, April 2007 School Bus Driver Qualifications
Policy News, October 2006 OSPI Updates Bus Driver Rules

Adoption Date: 10/25/18
Revised Dates: 12.05; 10.06; 04.07; 12.11; 08.18



6640—SCHOOL-OWNED VEHICLES

The district may provide for the necessary transportation and expenses that are incurred in the course of performing services for the district, whether within or outside the district. All such vehicles shall be properly marked with letters of contrasting color at least 1-1/4″ in height in a conspicuous place on both sides of the vehicle. A district may use a distinctive insignia, which shall be at least six (6) inches in diameter across its narrowest dimension. Unless otherwise specified, all travel must be approved in advance by the staff member’s immediate supervisor.

The superintendent is directed to establish procedures for the use of school-owned vehicles. At the beginning of each school year, the superintendent will provide the board with a list of staff members who are assigned a school-owned vehicle on a 24-hour basis. The district shall comply with IRS regulations pertaining to the use of district-provided vehicles for personal commuting.

Cross References:
Board Policy 5341 Reimbursement for Travel Expenses

Legal References:
RCW 46.08.065 Publicly-owned vehicles to be marked–Exceptions

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6690—CONTRACTING FOR TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

If the board enters into a contract for transportation services, the contractor shall operate such equipment according to district policy and the rules and regulations of the state board of education. The contract shall be in effect for no more than five years. Prior to entering into such a contract the district shall determine that the cost of contracting will not exceed the projected cost of operating its own system. Such assurances shall be submitted to the superintendent of public instruction for approval.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.160.010 Operation of student transportation program — Responsibility of local district — Scope — Transporting of elderly — Insurance
RCW 28A.160.140 Contract for pupil transportation services with private nongovernmental entity–Competitive bid procedures
RCW 28A.335.170 Contracts to lease building space and portable buildings, rent or have maintained security systems, computers and other equipment, and provide pupil transportation services
Ch. 392-144 WAC School Bus Driver Qualifications
Ch. 392-141 WAC Transportation – State Allocation for Operations
Ch. 392-143 WAC Transportation–Specifications for School Buses
Ch. 392-145 WAC Transportation–Operation Rules

Adoption Date: 3/23/06
Raymond School District #116



6700‑NUTRITION, HEALTH, AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

The board recognizes that a healthy school environment prepares students for college, careers, and successful futures. Students who eat well-balanced meals and engage in regular exercise are more likely to learn in the classroom. The board supports the District’s increased emphasis on nutrition, health and physical education, and physical activity at all grade levels to enhance the well-being of the District’s students. Therefore, it is the policy of the Board of Directors to provide students with access to nutritious food; emphasize health education and physical education; and provide students with opportunities for physical activity.

Wellness Policy

The District, through a wellness committee, will develop and implement a comprehensive wellness policy in compliance with state and federal requirements for districts participating in the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards.

Nutrition and Food Services Program
The Board of Directors supports the philosophy of the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program and will provide wholesome and nutritious meals for children in the District’s schools. The Board authorizes the Superintendent to administer the food services program, provided that any decision to enter into a contract with a food service management company will require the approval of the Board. Expenditures for food supplies shall not exceed the estimated revenues.
 
The Superintendent is responsible for:

  • Distributing meal applications and determining eligibility for school meals;
  • Protecting the identity of students eligible for free and reduced-price meals;
  • Ensuring meals meet USDA meal pattern requirements;
  • Ensuring meal periods are in compliance with USDA regulations;
  • Establishing a Food Safety Plan;
  • Determining meal prices and submitting them to the board for approval annually;
  • Using the full entitlement of USDA Foods;
  • Maintaining a nonprofit school food service account;
  • Ensuring all revenues are used solely for the school meal program;
  • Establishing a meal charge policy;
  • Accommodating children with special dietary needs;
  • Ensuring compliance with USDA nondiscrimination policies;
  • Following proper procurement procedures; and
  • Ensuring compliance with the Smart Snacks in School standards.

Health and Physical Education Program


The District’s K-12 health and physical education programs will be aligned with the Washington State Health and Physical Education K-12 Learning Standards and will include, but not be limited to, the development of knowledge and skills to be physically active, eat nutritiously, access reliable health information and services, communicate effectively, and set health-enhancing goals. 

The District will ensure that the following requirements are met:

  • All students in grades one through eight receive an average of one hundred instructional minutes per week of physical education per year.
  • All high school students are required to complete a minimum of three semesters (1.5 credits) of physical education and one semester (.5 credit) of health education.
  • The district will offer a one-credit course or its equivalent in physical education for each grade in the high school program (grades 9-12).
  • All students have equal and equitable opportunities for health and physical education.
  • All students, from kindergarten through grade 12, will participate in a quality, standards-based health and physical education program.
  • OSPI- developed assessments or other strategies will be used in health and physical education, formerly known as classroom-based assessments (CBAs).

Additionally, school districts must conduct an annual review of their PE programs. The review must consist of numerous provisions, including:

  • The number of individual students completing a PE class during the school year;
  • The average number of minutes per week of PE received by students in grades 1 through 8, expressed in appropriate reporting ranges;
  • The number of students granted waivers from PE requirements;
  • An indication of whether all PE classes are taught by instructors who possess a valid health and fitness endorsement;
  • The PE class sizes, expressed in appropriate reporting ranges;
  • An indication of whether, as a matter of policy or procedure, the district routinely modifies and adapts its PE curriculum for students with disabilities; and
  • An indication of whether the district routinely excludes students from PE classes for disciplinary reasons.

As a best practice and subject to available funding, the District will strive to ensure:

  • Students will be moderately to vigorously active for at least 50% of class time during most or all physical education class sessions.
  • All schools will have certificated physical education teachers providing instruction.
  • All schools will have appropriate class sizes, facilities, equipment, and supplies needed to deliver quality health and physical education consistent with state standards.
  • All physical education teachers will be encouraged to participate in professional development in physical education at least once a year.

Physical Activity


Physical education class is not to be used or withheld as punishment for any reason. All schools, as a best practice and subject to available funding, will participate in a multi-component approach by which schools use all opportunities for students to by physically active, such as the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and will provide the following:

  • Quality physical education;
  • Physical activity during the school day (brain boosters/energizers);
  • Physical activity before and after school;
  • Recess (which will not be used or withheld as punishment for any reason);
  • Family and community engagement;
  • Staff wellness and health promotion;
  • Active transportation; and
  • School district facilities.

Cross References:
2150 – Co-Curricular Program
2151 – Interscholastic Activities
2161 – Special Education and Related Services for Eligible Students
2162 – Education of Students With Disabilities Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
2410 – High School Graduation Requirements
3210 – Nondiscrimination
3422 – Student Sports – Concussion, Head Injury and Sudden Cardiac Arrest
4260 – Use of School Facilities

Legal References:
RCW 28A.210.365 Food choice, physical activity, childhood fitness — Minimum standards — District waiver or exemption policy.
RCW 28A.230.040 Physical Education – Grades 1-8
RCW 28A.230.050 Physical Education in High Schools
RCW 28A.230.095 Essential academic learning requirements and assessments — Verification reports.
RCW 28A.235.120 Meal Programs — Establishment and Operation — Personnel — Agreements
RCW 28A.235.130 Milk for children at school expense
RCW 28A.235.140 School breakfast programs
RCW 28A. 235.145 School breakfast and lunch programs –Use of state funds
RCW 28A. 235.150 School breakfast and lunch programs – Grants to increase participation – Increased state support
RCW 28A.235.160 Requirements to implement school breakfast, lunch and summer food service programs – Exemptions
RCW 28A.235.170 Washington grown fresh fruit and vegetable grant program
RCW 28A.623.020 Nonprofit program for elderly — Authorized — Restrictions
RCW 69.04 Intrastate Commerce in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics
RCW 69.06.010 Food and beverage service worker’s permit — Filing, duration — Minimum training requirements
RCW 69.06.020 Permit exclusive and valid throughout state — Fee
RCW 69.06.030 Diseased persons — May not work — Employer may not hire
RCW 69.06.050 Permit to be secured within fourteen days from time of employment.
RCW 69.06.070 Limited duty permit
WAC 180-51-068 State subject and credit requirements for high school graduation—Students entering the ninth grade on or after July 1, 2015.
WAC 392-157-125 Time for meals
WAC 392-410-135 Physical Education – Grade school and high school requirement.
WAC 392-410-136 Physical Education Requirement-Excuse
2 CFR Part 200 – Procurement
7 CFR, Parts 210 and 220
7 CFR, Part 245.5

Management Resources:

2018 – May Issue

2017 – July Issue
2017 – April Issue
Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program
2015 – June Issue
Recommendations for Waivers in High School Physical Education/Fitness Education, OSPI (September 2013)
2014 – February Issue
Wellness Policy Best Practices, OSPI (January 2013)
Policy News, February 2005 Nutrition and Physical Fitness Policy
Policy News, December 2004 Nutrition and Physical Fitness Update
Alliance for a Healthier Generation Wellness Policies
OSPI Child Nutrition School Wellness Policy Best Practices for Policy Development, Implementation and Evaluation

Adoption Date: 11/21/17   Technical Fixes: 5/29/18
Raymond School District #116



6700P‑NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Local School Wellness Policy (LSWP)

The district will convene an advisory committee to assist in development of the District- wide LSWP. The committee may include parents, students, representatives of the school food authority, the school board and school administrators, teachers of physical education, school health professionals and the public in developing, implementing, periodically reviewing and updating the LSWP, shown below.

School Meal Programs and Competitive Foods 
The District will follow the USDA meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and Smart Snacks in School standards for all food and beverages sold to students on school campus during the school day. These are available at http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/governance/legislation/allfoods flyer.pdf.

While students/parents/guardians are permitted to bring commercial foods to school that do not meet the Smart Snacks standards on occasions such as birthdays and holiday celebrations, the District will encourage healthy food choices in all school operations.

Celebrations and Rewards

All foods offered on the school campus by the school or District will meet or exceed the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards. The following are encouraged to meet these standards:

  • Celebrations and parties.
  • Classroom snacks brought by parents.
  • Rewards and incentives. The District will provide teachers and other relevant school staff a list of alternative ways to reward children. Foods and beverages will not be used as a reward, or withheld as punishment for any reason, such as for performance or behavior.

Fundraising

Foods and beverages that meet or exceed the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards may be sold through fundraisers on the school campus during the school day. The District will make available to parents and teachers a list of healthy fundraising ideas.

Water

To promote hydration, free, safe, and unflavored drinking water will be available to all students throughout the school day and throughout every school campus. The District will make drinking water available where school meals are served during mealtimes. In addition, students will be allowed to bring and carry (approved) water bottles filled with only water with them throughout the day.

School Cafeterias

  • Any student may eat in the school cafeteria or other designated place;
  • Meal prices will be established by the superintendent and food service supervisor, with approval of the board, at the beginning of each year;
  • Healthy option foods should be competitively priced; and
  • Meal prices will be conspicuously posted in each cafeteria or designated meal area.

Nutrition Education and Food Services Operation

In order to support the school’s nutrition and food services operation as an essential partner in the educational mission of the District and its role in the District’s comprehensive nutrition program, the superintendent is responsible for:

  • Encouraging students to participate in the school meal programs.;
  • Providing varied and nutritious food choices consistent with the applicable school meal program guidelines; and
  • Providing that:
    • Students have adequate time to eat their entire meal;
    • Seating for meals is uncrowded and occurs in a pleasant and safe environment;
    • Rules for mealtime behavior are consistently enforced;
    • Mealtime supervision is appropriate;
    • Elementary student recess held in conjunction with the lunch period occurs prior to or immediately following the lunch period; and
    • Buses arrive in time for students to participate in the School Breakfast Program.

Staff Development 
Ongoing in-service and professional development training opportunities for staff in the area of food nutrition will be encouraged.

Family and Community Involvement 
In order to promote family and community involvement in supporting and reinforcing nutrition education in schools, the school principal is responsible for ensuring:

  • Nutrition education materials and breakfast and lunch menus are made available to parents;
  • Parents are encouraged to promote their child’s participation in the school meals program. If their children do not participate in the school meals program, parents should provide their children with Healthy snacks/meals;
  • Families are invited to attend exhibitions of student nutrition projects or health fairs;
  • Nutrition education curriculum includes homework that students can do with their families (e.g., reading and interpreting food labels, reading nutrition-related newsletters, preparing healthy recipes, etc.);
  • School staff are encouraged to cooperate with other agencies and community groups to provide opportunities for student projects related to nutrition, as appropriate; and
  • School staff consider the various cultural preferences in development of nutrition education programs and food options.

Nutrition Education

The District’s K-12 nutrition education curriculum shall be in alignment with the Washington State K-12 Learning Standards. District’s nutrition education K-12 curriculum should include, but not be limited to, the following:

Age-appropriate nutritional knowledge, including:

  • Understand the relationship of nutrition and food nutrients to physical performance and body composition;
  • Learn the benefits of healthy eating;
  • Understand essential nutrients;
  • Learn about nutritional deficiencies;
  • Understand the principles of healthy weight management;
  • Understand the use and misuse of dietary supplements;
  • Learn safe food preparation, handling, and storage; and
  • Appreciate cultural diversity related to food and eating.
  • Age-appropriate nutrition-related skills, including:
  • Gather and analyze health information;
  • Analyze nutrition information to plan and prepare a healthy meal;
  • Understand and use food labels,
  • Evaluate nutrition information, misinformation, and commercial food and advertising; and
  • Assess one’s personal eating habits, set goals for improvement, and achieve those goals.

Nutrition education at all levels of the District’s integrated curriculum should include, but not be limited to, the following essential components designed to help students learn:

Age-appropriate nutritional knowledge, including understanding the relationship of nutrition and food nutrients to physical performance and body composition; recognizing patterns of growth and development; understanding the concept of control and prevention of disease; acquiring skills to live safely and reduce health risks; understanding how environmental factors affect health; learn the benefits of healthy eating; understand essential nutrients; learn about nutritional deficiencies; understand the principles of healthy weight management; understand the use and misuse of dietary supplements; learn safe food preparation, handling, and storage; and appreciate cultural diversity related to food and eating;

Age-appropriate nutrition-related skills, including gathering and analyzing health information; using social skills to promote health and safety; understand how emotions influence decision making; analyze health and safety information and develop a health and fitness plan and a monitoring system, to plan and prepare a healthy meal, understand and use food labels, and to critically evaluate nutrition information, misinformation, and commercial food and advertising; and how to assess one’s personal eating habits, set goals for improvement, and achieve those goals.

Physical Education and Physical Activity

Health and Physical Education Curriculum
 It is the District’s position that all students have equal and equitable opportunities for health and physical education in our schools. The District’s K-12 curriculum shall be in alignment with the Washington State K-12 Learning Standards. The goals of the District are:

  • All children, from kindergarten through grade 12, will participate in a quality, standards-based health and physical education program;
  • OSPI-developed assessments or other strategies will be used in Health and Fitness/Physical Education, formerly known as classroom-based assessments (CBAs).
  • The District will make appropriate accommodations to allow for equitable participation for all student and will adapt physical education classes and equipment necessary. The District will shall ensure that any student eligible for special education will be provided appropriate physical education services.
  • All schools will have certificated physical education teachers providing instruction; and
  • All schools will have appropriate class sizes, facilities, equipment, and supplies needed to deliver quality physical education consistent with state and national standards.
  • A physical education curriculum includes instruction and practice in a variety of motor skills and movement patterns; knowledge of concepts related to movement and performance; knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness; responsible personal and social behavior; and values physical activity for health and enjoyment.

Physical Education Requirements and Waiver Policy

Physical Activity

  • •All students children, (K-12), will participate in a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program.
    • A Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) is a multi-component approach by which school Districts and schools use all opportunities for students to be physically active, meet the nationally-recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day, and develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence to be physically active for a lifetime. A CSPAP reflects strong coordination and synergy across all of the components: quality physical education as the foundation, physical activity before, during, and after school, staff involvement, and family and community engagement.
  • •Physical activity during the school day (including but not limited to recess, brain boosters/energizers, or physical education) will not be used or withheld as punishment for any reason. The District will provide teachers and other school staff with a list of ideas for alternative ways to discipline students.

Recess

Each school will offer physically active daily recess opportunities that align with state and national recess recommendations and maintain safe and age-appropriate equipment to use during recess. or teachers will encourage students to be active. Recess will complement, not substitute for, physical education class.

Staff Development
 Provide ongoing in-service and professional development training opportunities for staff in the area of health education, physical education and physical activity will be encouraged.

Family and Community Involvement
 In order to promote family and community involvement in supporting and reinforcing physical education in the schools, the school principal is responsible for ensuring:

  • Physical education activity ideas are sent home with students;
  • Parents are encouraged to promote their child’s participation in the school’s physical education programs and after school activities;
  • Families are invited to attend and participate in physical education activity programs and health fairs;
  • Physical education curriculum includes homework that students can do with their families;
  • School staff consider the various cultural preferences in development of physical education programs; and
  • School staff are encouraged to cooperate with other agencies and community groups to provide opportunities for students to participate in physical activity programs.

School District Facilities

Access to school sites will be provided through permitting use of facilities to community youth sports groups consistent with the District’s facilities use policy, community college, and municipal joint use agreements and partnerships with youth organizations so additional opportunities are available for all youth in the our communities to participate in quality physical activity, fitness, sports, and recreation programs.

Active Transport

The District will identify safe and active routes to and from school to promote alternative transport methods for children, such as walking and bicycle programs. The District will encourage this behavior by engaging and promoting activities such as:

  • Designation of safe or preferred routes to school;
  • Promotional activities such as participation in International Walk to School Week, National Walk and Bike to School Week;
  • Secure storage facilities for bicycles and helmets (e.g., shed, cage, fenced area);
  • Instruction on walking/bicycling safety provided to students;
  • Promotion of safe routes program to students, staff, and parents via newsletters, websites, local newspaper;
  • Crossing guards are used appropriately;
  • Ensuring Crosswalks exist on streets leading to schools;
  • Documentation of the number of children walking and/or biking to and from school; and
  • Creation and distribution of maps of the school environment (e.g., sidewalks, crosswalks, roads, pathways, bike racks, etc.).

Program Evaluation and Assessment

A plan for periodically measuring and making available to the public, including students, parents and the community an assessment on the implementation of the LSWP and including:

  • The extent to which schools under the jurisdiction of the District are in compliance with the wellness policy;
  • The extent to which the District’s wellness policy compares to the model Wellness School Assessment Tool; and
  • A description of the progress made in attaining the goals of the District’s wellness policy.

Physical Education

Health and Fitness
 It is the District’s position that all students have equal and equitable opportunities for physical activity and fitness education in our schools. The superintendent is encouraged to review and consider implementing physical activity and fitness education program improvements. The goals of the District are:

  • All children, from kindergarten through grade 12, will participate in a daily, quality, standards-based physical activity/fitness education program;
  • All schools will have certificated physical education teachers providing instruction; and
  • All schools will have appropriate class sizes, facilities, equipment, and supplies needed to deliver quality physical education consistent with national standards.

Schools will require students in grades one through eight to engage in physical education averaging 100 instructional minutes per week and all high school students will complete two credit(s) of health and fitness.

Access to school sites will be provided through permitting use of facilities to community youth sports groups consistent with the District’s facilities use policy, community college and municipal joint use agreements and partnerships with youth organizations so additional opportunities are available for all youth in our communities to participate in quality physical activity, fitness, sports and recreation programs.

Schools should identify safe and active routes to school and promote alternative methods for children to travel to and from school, such as walking and bicycle programs.

Schools will prohibit the use of physical activity and withholding of physical education class and other forms of physical activity as punishment.

Family and Community Involvement 
In order to promote family and community involvement in supporting and reinforcing physical education in the schools, the school principal is responsible for ensuring the activities mentioned in the section above.

Local School Wellness Policy (LSWP)

The District will convene an advisory committee to assist in continued development and monitoring of this District-wide LSWP. The committee may include food service directors and staff, parents, building level administrators, school board members, students, nutritionists, school health care professionals, physical education staff, the public and interested community organizations.

Program Evaluation and Assessment

  • Nutrition:
    • ​The Superintendent will periodically measure, using the Wellness School Assessment Tool: 1) the extent to which all District schools are in compliance with the District’s LSWP; and 2) the extent to which the District’s LSWP compares to the Wellness School Assessment Tool itself.
    • The Superintendent will annually describe, in the District’s Annual Report, the progress made in attaining the goals of the Districts LSWP.
  • Physical Education:
    • District physical activity/health and fitness programs will be monitored and assessed regularly in conjunction with other District academic and health-related programs using tools like the Physical Best Program, Healthy Kids Survey, CDC School Health Index or an OSPI approved assessment. Results of these surveys and assessments will be reported to the board, school sites, and made available to parents and community on an annual basis.


6800—SAFETY, OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY

A. Facilities Maintenance

The superintendent will provide for a program to maintain the district physical plant and grounds by way of a continuous program of repair, maintenance and reconditioning. Budget recommendations will be made each year to meet these needs and any such needs arising from an emergency.

B. Infrastructure Management

The Raymond Board of Directors also desires to maintain the infrastructure of district facilities.

In order to assure state funding, for facilities constructed new or new in lieu after 1994, the board will adopt an asset preservation program (APP). The APP will preserve the district facilities by employing a system of predictive, preventative, and proactive processes. Annually, the superintendent will report to the board on the condition of the facilities and the effectiveness of the APP. Every sixth year an independent assessment will be conducted and reported to the board and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Additionally, the superintendent will develop a process to evaluate all pre-1994 facilities for possible participation in the asset preservation program.

For initial participation in the APP, the board will submit a resolution to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction committing the district to implement the program.

The superintendent will develop procedures for the asset preservation program.

C. Playground Equipment

The board recognizes that playground equipment is an essential part of a complete school facility. All playground equipment, whether purchased by the district or donated by a community or school-related group, should be assessed in terms of suitability and durability and for possible health or safety hazards. Consideration will also be given to potential hazards when the playground is unsupervised during non-school hours.

The superintendent will develop specifications for playground equipment and related play surfaces. These specifications shall serve as criteria for the selection of playground equipment. Selection and installation of playground equipment will be based upon safety and contribution to child development.

D. Chemical and Laboratory Safety

The board recognizes the potential health and safety hazards that exist as a result of chemical storage and handling. Instruction will be emphasized in the safe and proper use of chemicals and substances and proper laboratory techniques. All students and staff are to wear safety glasses or goggles whenever they are working under potentially hazardous conditions. Laboratories should be ventilated sufficiently enough to provide a healthful, nonhazardous environment.

The superintendent is directed to establish safety guidelines and procedures which will minimize the hazards inherent in the science classes and laboratories in the schools.

E. Destruction of School Property

Staff will ensure that buildings, grounds, equipment and furniture are not abused. Students or non-students who abuse school property may be disciplined and required to pay for the damage incurred.

The superintendent will establish procedures for the investigation and reporting of damage or loss and will initiate action to collect for damages. A student’s grades, transcript or diploma may be withheld until restitution is made.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2151 Interscholastic Activities
Board Policy 3520 Student Fees, Fines, Charges
Board Policy 6511 Staff Safety
Board Policy 6605 Student Safety Walking to School and Riding Buses

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.335.300 Playground matting
RCW 28A.635.060 Defacing or injuring school property — Liability of pupil, parent, or guardian — Withholding grades, diploma, or transcripts — Suspension and restitution — Voluntary work program as alternative — Rights protected
WAC 392-347-023 State Assistance in Post 1993 Facilities

Management Resources:
Policy News, October 2011 Policy Manual Revisions
Policy News, June 2009 New Rules for Asset Preservation Program

Adoption Date: 12/12/11
Raymond School District #116



6800P—SAFETY, OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY

Playground Equipment

Plans to install playground equipment, either temporarily or permanently at a school site, will be reviewed by a committee appointed by the school principal and other appropriate staff members. A representative from the current insurance carrier will be contacted prior to installation.

Guidelines:

A. Equipment must meet the safety criteria listed below:

  1. All playground equipment must have an immediate ground surface which limits the impact from a fall, according to ASTM F-355-72. The safety surface must extend to the maximum distance to which a fall could occur;
  2. Equipment is to be placed so as to take advantage of topography of surrounding terrain and far enough apart so that there will be a dispersion of children allowing safe, free movement with the least possible congestion;
  3. All equipment is to be free from hazardous protrusions, points and sharp edges.
  4. Exposed component materials are to be rust-free, clean and durable to use and weather with a minimum amount of splintering, flaking or other deterioration. Lead paint and creosote will not be used;
  5. Equipment that is low to the ground and with a six (6) foot maximum vertical limit is preferred;
  6. All moving parts are to be concealed and be designed to minimize the chances of pinching or catching of clothing or of body; and
  7. All equipment must be securely anchored according to manufacturer’s recommendations and installed by the manufacturer or his/her authorized representative.

B. Equipment should require a minimum of maintenance, specifically for replacement of parts and painting;

C. Equipment should be aesthetically appealing, and encourage active and creative use;

D. Equipment should be difficult to vandalize; and

E. Unpadded cement or steel stationary poles should not be in areas intended for running games.

The maintenance supervisor will coordinate installation of approved equipment with the school principal. Quarterly inspections will be conducted.

Adoption Date: 02/23/12
Raymond School District #116



6801—CAPITAL ASSETS/THEFT-SENSITIVE ASSETS

Capital Assets

The district will maintain a comprehensive capital assets record-keeping system. The goal of the capital assets program is to protect the district against losses that would significantly affect the district’s students, staff, property, budget or the ability of the district to continue to fulfill its stewardship responsibilities.

For purpose of this policy, “capital assets” will mean land, improvements to land, easements, building improvements, vehicles, machinery, equipment, works of art and historical treasures, infrastructure and all other tangible and intangible assets that are used in operations and that have initial useful lives extending beyond a single reporting period which:

A. Retains its shape and appearance with use;

B. Is nonexpendable, meaning if the item is damaged or some of its parts are lost or worn out, it may be more feasible to repair it than to replace it with an entirely new item.

C. It does not lose its identity when incorporated into a more complex unit;

D. Is valued no less than $5,000 unless a lesser amount is set by the district; and

E. Has a life expectancy of at least one year.

Federal law requires a physical inventory of federally-funded assets at least once every two years. Reconciled inventory reports will be provided to the board. Such report will identify lost, damaged or stolen capital assets. Missing capital assets will be removed from district property records by a vote of the board.

No equipment will be removed for personal or non-school use.

Theft-Sensitive Assets

For purposes of this policy, “theft-sensitive” are those items identified by the district as most subject to loss. A list of theft-sensitive assets shall be maintained by the district. The district should establish procedures for internal controls and conduct an annual inventory of theft-sensitive assets.

The board will be provided a report identifying assets not accounted for in the annual inventory. These assets will be removed from the district property records through school board action annually.

The superintendent will develop procedures to implement this policy, including maintenance requirements and sales procedures to ensure the highest possible return.

Cross References:
Board Policy 6570 Property and Data Management

Legal References:
RCW 28A.335.090 Conveyance and acquisition of property — Management — Appraisal
7 CFR § 3015, 3016 Agriculture
34 CFR § 80.32 Uniform Administrative requirements for grants and cooperative agreements to state and local governments – Equipment
45 CFR § 92.32 Health and Human Services
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-87, Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments, Attachment B(19)

Management Resources:
Policy News, June 2012 Auditor’s Raises Concerns Regarding Theft-Sensitive Assets
Policy News, June 2008 Capital Assets/Theft-Sensitive Assets
Policy News, April 2006 Fixed Assets

Adoption Date: 08/21/12
Raymond School District #116



6801P—CAPITAL ASSETS/THEFT-SENSITIVE ASSETS

The district’s physical facilities director is responsible for inventories of district property. Inventory will be conducted at least once every other fiscal year for all capital assets, except land; infrastructure; buildings; and improvements other than buildings and leasehold improvements. A theft-sensitive assets inventory will be conducted annually. The individual(s) conducting each inventory will have no direct responsibility for assets subject to the inventory count.

District assets will be marked with a unique identification number (e.g. bar code, property tag) and identified as district property. All capital assets and theft-sensitive assets will be identified and marked upon purchase or receipt.

When placing a capital asset on the inventory, the receiving individual will record:

A. Description of the item;

B. Serial number or other identification number (bar code, tag number, etc.);

C. Source of the asset;

D. Who holds title;

E. Acquisition date;

F. Cost of the asset;

G. Percentage of federal participation in the cost of the property and the federal program charged;

H. Location of the asset;

I. Use and condition of the property; and

J. Ultimate disposition data including the date of disposal and sale price, if applicable. Federally purchased items with a per unit fair market value over $5,000 must reimburse the federal program proportionately. Disposed items with a per unit fair market value of less than $5,000 may be retained, sold or otherwise disposed of with no further obligation to the awarding agency.

The district shall maintain an inventory identifying theft-sensitive assets. This inventory will be reviewed and updated annually. When placing a theft-sensitive asset on the inventory the physical facilities director will record the information needed by the district. This should include, at a minimum, a description of the item and identification number, location and federal participation, if any.

At the conclusion of the physical inventory, the building principals and department administrators will be provided with a written copy of the inventory that lists all the assets that have been assigned to that site. The inventory will clearly identify all assigned items, including those that were not found, not used, or were in an obviously unserviceable condition.

Principals and department administrators are required to attempt to locate items that have been listed as missing. Within 25 working days, the principals and department administrators are expected to return a copy of the inventory report to the purchasing department showing which items have been located and which are still missing.

The missing items will be consolidated on a report of potential write-offs. The superintendent will review the report and approve the total amount of assets to be written off. Only write-off items will be removed from the capital assets inventory system.

Items not being used or in an obviously unserviceable condition will be identified during inventory and the maintenance department will be contacted to pick up the item(s) for auction or disposal.



6810—ENERGY MANAGEMENT, EDUCATION AND CONSERVATION

The board recognizes the responsibility to develop and maintain programs to support the conservation of energy and natural resources. In recognition of this leadership responsibility, the district will strive to (a) institute effective energy management and (b) provide information and develop conservation attitudes and skills for the students it serves. To achieve the objectives of energy management, the board will appoint a team representing the board, administration, staff, students, parents and utility representatives to develop and review plans for efficient energy management in the daily operation of the district’s facilities. The committee will have the responsibility to:

A. Assess past and present energy consumption practices;

B. Review current operational and maintenance practices;

C. Study operation changes designed to reduce consumption and related costs;

D. Examine the feasibility of retrofitting alternatives for existing facilities as a result of engineering studies and reports;

E. Provide periodic reports and/or recommendations to the superintendent and board;

F. Monitor the energy management measures which are implemented;

G. Ensure, through a monitoring process, that instruction in energy use and conservation is incorporated into the district’s program.

The board, as part of its educational mission, desires to foster the conservation ethic among the students. To achieve the objectives of the energy education program, instructional activities will be designed to change the student’s perceptions of the supply and costs of natural resources which, in turn, will stimulate skill building to effect responsible conservation behavior in students. As part of the educational process, students will be encouraged to assess the energy consumption policies of the school as a means of applying knowledge and skill.

The superintendent is authorized to establish annual energy management goals, annual energy education goals, and extrinsic rewards to school buildings in recognition of conservation accomplishments. The superintendent will make periodic and annual evaluation reports to the board.

Energy Conservation

In light of the increasing cost and dwindling supply of conventional energy sources, a life cycle cost analysis will be required of each major construction project. A life cycle cost analysis will include a description of:

A. Insulation and heat retention factors;

B. Variable occupancy and operating conditions to be incurred by the facility;

C. Overall supply and demand of the facility’s energy system and actual or potential utilization of outside energy sources, such as climate;

D. Initial cost of energy plant; and

E. An energy consumption analysis comparing alternative energy systems.

As part of its commitment to energy conservation, the district will consider the use of at least one renewable energy system such as solar energy, wind or wood or wood waste, geothermal, or other nonconventional fuels in any construction or renovation project.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 2020 Curriculum Development and adoption of instructional materials

Legal References:
Chapter 39.35 RCW Energy conservation in design of public facilities

Management Resources:
Policy News, October 2011 Policy Manual Revisions

Adoption Date: 12/12/11
Raymond School District #116



6881—DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT AND/OR MATERIALS

The board has the authority to declare equipment, supplies, furniture and other district personal property obsolete and/or surplus. The superintendent shall establish procedures for their sale, trade or disposal except that the board must approve of any sales where:

A. A single unit item has a current value in excess of $1,000; and/or

B. Multiple items have a total unit value in excess of $5,000.

Surplus or obsolete books or other reading materials shall be disposed of as follows:

A. If the reading materials are estimated to have value as reading materials in excess of $l,000, they shall be sold at public auction to the person submitting the highest reasonable bid following publication of notice of the auction in a newspaper with a general circulation in the district;

B. If no reasonable bids are submitted or if the reading materials are estimated to have value as reading materials of $l,000 or less, the district may directly negotiate the sale of the reading materials to a public or private entity; or

C. If the reading materials are determined to have no value as reading materials or if no purchaser is found, the reading materials may be recycled or destroyed.

Prior to disposing of any surplus texts, other books, equipment, materials or relocatable facilities, the superintendent shall serve written notice in a newspaper of general circulation in the school district and to any public school district or private school in Washington state annually requesting such notice. All schools on the list shall be notified in writing of the materials and equipment that is available. The material or equipment shall be sold to any interested public or private school at its depreciated cost or fair market value, whichever is greater. Students shall have priority in the purchase of texts. Disposition of such surplus property to parties other than public or private schools may take place thirty days after written notice is served.

The preceding notice requirements do not apply to the loan, lease, sale or transfer of assistive devices for the use or benefit of children with disabilities , their parents, or any public or private nonprofit agency providing education, health or rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities. Such devices do not need to be declared surplus. The sale or transfer of such devices shall be recorded and based on the item’s depreciated value. The district shall establish and maintain an inventory of assistive technology devices whose value exceeds $100, and for each device shall establish a value that shall be adjusted annually to reflect depreciation.

“Assistive device” means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off-the-shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of children with disabilities.

Funds derived from the rental, sale or lease of student transportation equipment shall be placed into the transportation vehicle fund. Funds derived from the sale of personal property shall be placed into the general fund.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.155.160 Assistive devices – Transfer for benefit of children with disabilities – Record Inventory
RCW 28A.335.060 Surplus school property, rental, lease or use of–Disposition of moneys received from
RCW 28A.335.090 Conveyance and acquisition of property—Management – Appraisal
RCW 28A.335.180 Surplus texts and other educational aids, notice of availability–Student priority as to texts
RCW 28A.335.205 Assistive devices – Transfer for benefit of children with disabilities – Record inventory
RCW 39.33.070 School districts and libraries–Disposal of obsolete or surplus reading materials–Procedures
WAC 392-143-050 Resold School Buses

Adoption Date: 3/23/2006
Raymond School District #116



6881P—DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT AND/OR MATERIALS

The procedures for the sale of obsolete and/or surplus equipment, supplies, furniture and other district personal property are as follows:

A. The principal or department supervisor shall supply a written rationale, which supports the obsolescence of the item.

B. All other departments and/or buildings shall have the opportunity to view the item during a two-week period.

C. If the item is not claimed during the two-week period, a value shall be placed on the item by two staff members who are familiar with items of a similar nature. The value of textbooks shall be established as follows:

New Books Purchased During Current Term Full Cost

Books 2 years old 80%

3 years old 60%

4 years old 40%

over 4 years old 20%

D. Interested public and private schools shall be advised in writing of a two-day period in which they shall have an opportunity to view and/or purchase the obsolete and/or surplus item.

E. The remaining item shall be available for purchase by the general public.

F. The district shall publicize this sale which shall be open to the general public.

G. The board shall specify the nature and conduct of any sale of property which exceeds the limits specified in policy 6881.



6882—SALE OF REAL PROPERTY

The board has exclusive control of the acquisition and disposal of all district property. This power will be exercised only when the board determines by resolution that such property is or is not necessary for school purposes.

Once the board has considered all the factors relating to a proposed sale of real property, it will comply with all requirements of the law, including:

A. A market value appraisal by a professionally designated real estate appraiser or by a general real estate appraiser certified under chapter 18.140 RCW, selected by the board will be secured.

B. No sale of real property is to take place if the sale price would be less than 90 percent of the appraisal made by the appraiser unless the property has been on the market for one year, in which case it may be reappraised and sold for not less than 75 percent of the reappraisal value if the sale is approved by the unanimous consent of the board.

C. If the appraised value exceeds $70,000, notice that such a sale is being considered is to be published in a newspaper of general circulation within the district once a week for at least two consecutive weeks. The notice will describe the property and specify the date, time and place of a public hearing scheduled to consider the property specified for sale. Evidence concerning the proposed sale along with the advisability of selling the parcel is to be taken into account by the board at such a hearing.

D. Bids may be secured or a licensed real estate broker may be engaged. If the latter, the commission will not exceed 7 percent. Any appraiser selected by the board to appraise the market value of a parcel of property may not be a party to any contract with the district to sell the parcel for a period of three years after the appraisal. No bid award will be made within a forty-five day period following publication of notice of the intended sale in a newspaper of general circulation in the district.

Receipts from the sale of real property will be placed into the debt service fund or in the capital projects fund. Proceeds from the sale of the property may be used to reimburse district funds for costs associated with the sale. The reimbursements may be deposited back into the fund from which the sale-related expenditure occurred.

Legal References:
Ch. 18.140 RCW Certified Real Estate Appraiser Act
RCW 28A.335.060 Surplus school property — Rental, Lease or use of — Disposition of Moneys Received From
RCW 28A.335.090 Conveyance and acquisition of property Management Appraisal
RCW 28A.335.120 Real property — Sale — Notice and hearing— Appraisal— Broker or real estate appraiser services — Real estate sales contracts— limitation
RCW 39.33.010 Sale, exchange, transfer, lease of public property authorized — Section deemed alternative

Management Resources:
Policy News, June 2011 Additional Policy Updates
Policy News, June 2001 Use of Real Estate Appraisers Modified
Policy News, February 2005 Surplus Property

Adoption Date: 08/23/11
Raymond School District #116



6883—CLOSURE OF FACILITIES

The board of directors has the authority to close a school building when an unforeseen natural event or mechanical failure causes a facility to become unsafe, unhealthy, inaccessible, or inoperable. Prior to the closure of a school facility for foreseen circumstances, the board shall have prepared a written analysis which considers the following issues:

A. Projected or actual enrollment declines and the likelihood that they shall remain permanent;

B. The effect that the disposition or retirement shall have on other facilities and on the district’s educational program offering;

C. Student and staff displacement, including transportation costs to new facilities and staff reassignment;

D. Potential for renovation;

E. Financial considerations in terms of such factors as staff costs, operating and maintenance cost, the potential revenue from sale or lease of property, the cost of closure and transferring operations elsewhere;

F. Safety, health and fire regulations; and

G. Whether or not the facility may effectively be used for other purposes.

During a ninety-day period following the development of a written analysis, the board shall conduct one or more hearings to receive testimony on any issues related to the closure of a school. Each hearing notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation, which serves the area where the school is located. The last notice shall be published at least seven days prior to the hearing. The notice shall contain the date, time, place and purpose of the hearing. Comments received from interested parties shall be used for advisory purposes only. The final determination of whether a facility shall be closed or remain open shall be made by the board.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.150.290(2) State superintendent to make rules and regulations – Unforeseen conditions or actions to be recognized – Paperwork limited
RCW 28A.320.010 Corporate powers
RCW 28A.335.020 School Closures – Policy of citizen involvement required – Summary of effects – Hearings – Notice

Adoption Date: 04/27/2006
Raymond School District #116



6890—STATE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT COMPLIANCE

The district accepts its responsibility, as described by the Washington State Legislature in the State Environmental Policy Act, specifically Chapter 43.21C.

In order to fulfill its responsibilities under the State Environmental Policy Act, the district adopts by reference all sections or subsections of the chapter 197.11 of the Washington Administrative Code.

Additional Definitions

In addition to those definitions contained within WAC 197-11-700 to 197-11-799, the following terms will have the following meanings, unless the context indicates otherwise:

A. District: District means the Raymond School District No. 116, Pacific County, state of Washington.

B. SEPA Rules: SEPA Rules means Chapter 197-11 WAC adopted by the Council on Environmental Policy.

The district establishes the following criteria as the basis for exercising authority relative to environmental issues. The district will use all practicable means, consistent with other essential considerations of state policy, to improve and coordinate plans, functions, programs, and resources to the end that the state and its citizens may:

A. Fulfill the responsibilities of each generation as trustee of the environment for succeeding generations;

B. Assure for all people of Washington safe, healthful, productive, and aesthetically and culturally pleasing surroundings;

C. Attain the widest range of beneficial uses of the environment without degradation, risk to health or safety, or other undesirable and unintended consequences;

D. Preserve important historic, cultural, and natural aspects of our national heritage;

E. Maintain, wherever possible, an environment which supports diversity and variety of individual choice;

F. Achieve a balance between population and resource use which will permit high standards of living and a wide sharing of life’s amenities; and

G. Enhance the quality of renewable resources and approach the maximum attainable recycling of depletable resources.

The district recognizes that each person has a fundamental and inalienable right to a healthful environment and that each person has a responsibility to contribute to the preservation and enhancement of the environment.

Critical Areas

In its actions, the district will respect “critical areas” and their modified exemption criteria which have been adopted and displayed by local governments pursuant to The Growth Management Act, Chapter 36.70A RCW.

Actions which will be located wholly or partially within a critical area are to be treated no differently than other actions under these guidelines. A threshold determination will be made for all such actions, and an EIS will not be automatically required for a proposal merely because it is proposed for location in a critical area.

Use of Exemptions

In determining whether a proposal is exempt from SEPA the district will comply with the square footage and parking space threshold levels adopted by the city or county under WAC 197-11-800 (1). To determine whether or not a proposal is exempt, the district will ascertain the total scope of the proposal and the governmental licenses required. If a proposal includes a series of actions, physically or functionally related to each other, some of which are exempt and some which are not, the proposal is not exempt and the district must complete a threshold determination.

If a proposal includes both exempt and nonexempt actions, exempt actions may be authorized with respect to the proposal prior to compliance with the procedural requirements of these guidelines subject to the following limitations:

A. No nonexempt action will be authorized prior to compliance with procedural and substantive requirements;

B. No action will be authorized which will irrevocably commit the district to approve or authorize a nonexempt action;

C. The district may withhold approval of an exempt action which would lead to modification of the physical environment, when such modifications would serve no purpose if later approval of a nonexempt action is not secured; and

D. The district may withhold approval of exempt actions which would lead to substantial financial expenditures by a private applicant which would serve no purpose if later approval of a nonexempt action is not secured.

Lead Agency Determination and Responsibilities

The district is lead agency for the proposals it initiates and is responsible for compliance with SEPA regulations.

Environmental Checklist

Except as provided in WAC 197-11-315 the school district must complete an environmental checklist (WAC 197-11-960) for any proposal that meets the definition of action (WAC 197-11-709), and is not categorically exempted in WAC 197-11-800 and 880. This checklist will be the basis for the threshold determination.

For all proposals for which the district is the lead agency, the responsible official of the district will make the threshold determination pursuant to the criteria and procedures of WAC 197-11-300 through -360.

Preparation of EIS

The draft and final EIS will be prepared either by the responsible official or his/her designee or a consultant retained by the school district.

In the event that an EIS is to be prepared by a consultant, the responsible official will assure that the EIS is prepared in a responsible manner and with appropriate methodology. The responsible official will direct the areas of research and examination to be undertaken, as well as the organization of the resulting document.

No matter who participates in the preparation of an EIS, it must be approved by the responsible official prior to distribution.

Public Notice

The district will establish a mailing list for those interested citizens who wish to be informed regarding documents the district prepares that require public notice. If deemed appropriate by the responsible official, the school district will place appropriate notice in the paper of general circulation which serves the area.

Designation of Official to Perform Consulted Agency Responsibilities for the District

The superintendent or his designee will be responsible for the preparation of the written comments for the district in response to a consultation request prior to a threshold determination, participation in predraft consultation or reviewing a draft EIS.

The official designated by the district will be responsible for compliance by the district with WAC 197-11-400 through -460 wherever the district is a consulted agency, and he/she is authorized to develop operating procedures which will ensure that responses to consultation requests are prepared in a timely fashion and include data from all appropriate departments of the district.

Designation of Responsible Official

For those proposals for which the district is the lead agency, the responsible official will be the superintendent or his/her designee. The responsible official will make the threshold determination, supervise preparation of any required EIS and perform any other functions assigned to the “lead agency”.

Fees

No fee will be collected by the district for performing its duties as a consulted agency.

The district may charge any person for copies of any document prepared pursuant to the requirements of this ordinance and for mailing in a manner provided by Chapter 42.56 RCW.

Publication of Notice

The district may publish notice of action pursuant to RCW 43.21C.080 for any action to establish a time limit for judicial appeals.

The form of the notice will be as prescribed by the Department of Ecology and/or substantially in the form and manner set forth in RCW 43.21C.080. The notice will be published by the district pursuant to RCW 43.2lC.080.

Legal References:
Chapter 43.21C RCW State Environmental Policy
197-11 WAC State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Rules

Management Resources:
Policy News, October 2011 Additional Policy Updates

Policy News, December 1998 SEPA Policy Requires Periodic Review and Understanding

Adoption Date: 12/12/11
Raymond School District #116



6895—PESTICIDE NOTIFICATION, POSTING AND 
RECORD KEEPING

Upon request, the district will provide notification to staff and parents of the district’s pest control policies, methods and its posting and notification requirements.

The Superintendent is directed to develop procedures to assure that the District complies with the requirements of law regarding pesticide notification, posting and record keeping.

The District’s procedures for notification will include posting of sites of pesticide applications; and record keeping, including an annual summary report of pesticide usage.

Legal References:
RCW 17.21 Washington pesticide application act

Management Resources:
Policy News, February 2011 Pesticide Notification, Posting and Record Keeping
Policy News, June 2002 Pesticide Policies Required by July 1st

Adoption Date: 04/28/11
Raymond School District #116



6895P—PESTICIDE NOTIFICATION, POSTING AND RECORD KEEPING REQUIREMENTS

The District shall comply with all legal requirements for record keeping regarding the application of pesticides to school grounds or school facilities. This includes creation of an annual summary report of pesticide usage and compliance with state department of agriculture rules regarding record keeping. Such records will be available on request by interested persons under the state Public Records Act and other laws.

Procedure 6895 shall be printed and distributed upon request to employees, students and parents

At least 48 hours before the application of a pesticide to school facilities or school grounds, the District shall notify parents and staff of the planned application in writing, including the heading, “Notice: Pesticide Application.” This notice shall be posted in a prominent place in the building office in addition to being provided to parents and staff. This pre-notification is not required if the school grounds or facilities will not be occupied by students for two days following the application of the pesticide. If the application is not made within 48 hours of the notification, another notification shall be made prior to the application. This pre-notification is not required in the case of any emergency application of pesticides to a school facility, such as an application to control stinging pests, but full notification shall be made as soon as possible after the application.

Following the application of a pesticide to school facilities (structures and vehicles) a sign shall be posted at the location of the application. The notice shall be at least 8.5 x 11 inches in size, shall include the heading, “Notice: Pesticide Application,” and shall state the product name; date, time and specific location of the application; the pest for which the application was made; and a contact name and telephone number. The notice shall remain posted for 24 hours, or longer if required by the label of the pesticide.

Following the application of a pesticide to school grounds notice shall be posted at the location of the application and at each primary point of entry to the grounds. The notice shall be at least 4 x 5 inches in size and state that the landscape recently has been treated with a pesticide and provide a contact name and telephone number. The notice shall remain posted for 24 hours, or longer if required by the label of the pesticide.

These notices are not required for the application of antimicrobial pesticides (substances used to sanitize or disinfect for microbial pests: viruses, bacteria, algae and protozoa). These notices are not required for the placement of insect or rodent bait that are not accessible to children.

Adoption Date: 04/28/11
Raymond School District #116



6900—FACILITIES PLANNING

In order to provide the best possible physical environment for learning and teaching, the following factors shall be considered in the planning of district facilities:

A. Facilities shall accommodate the educational needs of students and be consistent with the educational philosophy and instructional goals of the district.

B. Facilities shall meet or exceed all health, safety and welfare regulations.

C. The district shall seek state and federal moneys to the maximum extent available to supplement its own financial resources.

D. Undesirable environmental impact shall be minimized.

E. Changing demographic factors shall be monitored in order that students’ needs are met when the future becomes the present.

F. Developments in the state cost stabilization program shall be followed when they are compatible with the district’s educational goals and promise significant savings to the district.

Facilities Master Plan

In order to efficiently manage the district’s present and future facilities needs, a facilities master plan shall be developed. Such plan shall cover a ten-year period, be developed in conjunction with the local comprehensive land-use plan and other growth management policies, be reviewed annually and include at least the following:

A. A cost analysis of financial ability of the district to implement its facilities program;

B. Existing and projected enrollment figures, including an analysis of the racial composition of the student population;

C. An inventory of the district’s undeveloped property and developed facilities, including an analysis of the number of students in each facility and whether the facility is over- or under-crowded.

D. An analysis of the appropriateness of the facilities to meet the needs of students and members of the public, including acceptability to students of both sexes and those with disabilities, all district services, programs and activities, when viewed in their entirety, shall be accessible to individuals with disabilities;

E. Recommendations as to the sale or other disposition of district property not needed in the future; and

F. Recommendations as to the acquisition, construction or modification of new sites or facilities and of how such shall better meet the needs of students and the educational program.

Enrollment Projections

Enrollment shall be projected for a five-year period using methods acceptable to the state board of education for determining the district’s eligibility for state construction grants. This projection shall be reviewed and revised annually and supplemented by an analysis of additional factors that may affect the student population, such as potential zoning and development changes within the district, housing projections and the development of new businesses and public projects.

Legal Reference:
42 U.S.C. SS 12101 et. Seq. Americans with Disabilities Act

Adoption Date: 04/27/2006
Raymond School District #116



6905‑SITE ACQUISITION

The district will attempt to acquire building sites substantially in advance of the actual need to construct facilities in order to minimize delay in projects and to realize financial savings to the district. The board will periodically review its inventory of land in light of growth trends in the district and local land use restrictions, and make such transactions as it determines will best meet the future needs of the district.

Prior to any purchase of real estate, the district will obtain a market value appraisal by a professionally designated real estate appraiser or by a general real estate appraiser certified under Chapter 18.140 RCW. The board will select the appraiser. The appraisal should identify the relevant zoning and Growth Management Act specifications to determine whether the intended use of the property is legally permitted. The district may investigate whether real estate outside the Urban Growth Area can be utilized for the siting of schools and school facilities.

In acquiring a new site, the board should first attempt to reach settlement with the owner through negotiations. Eminent domain proceedings may be commenced at the outset of the decision to purchase a particular site to avoid delay in the event of a negotiations breakdown. The district may resort to condemnation when it believes that negotiations will not lead to an amicable settlement. The district will comply with applicable relocation assistance requirements relating to the acquisition of sites.

The board must approve any purchase of real estate.

Legal References:
Chapter 8.16 RCW Eminent Domain by School Districts
Chapter 8.26 RCW Relocation Assistance—Real Property Acquisition Policy
RCW 28A.335.090 Conveyance and acquisition of property — Management — Appraisal
RCW 28A.335.220 Eminent Domain
Chapter 36.70A RCW Growth Management Act
ESHB 1017 and HB 2243 School Siting—Rural Areas—Growth Management Act
Chapter 39.33 RCW Intergovernmental Disposition of Property

Management Resources:
2017 – July Issue

Adoption Date: 11/21/17
Raymond School District #116



6910—CONSTRUCTION FINANCING

The board shall attempt to add moneys to the capital projects fund regularly in such amounts as are available and appropriate to the district’s needs as projected by the facilities master plan. Moneys in that fund which are not immediately needed shall be invested in those securities permitted by law which shall provide maximum return to the fund. In addition to those moneys, the board may consider non-voter approved debt within statutory limits and the board shall seek authority from district electors to issue bonds or levy a special capital improvements property tax assessment for school construction when specific projects are anticipated. The board shall also seek matching funds from the state board of education to the maximum extent available as well as any federal funds that may be available.

State School Construction Funds

Immediately after the board has approved the initiation of a construction project, the superintendent shall notify the state board of education of the board’s intent. All studies, notices and other requirements established by the state board of education as conditions for eligibility for state construction grants shall be completed by the superintendent.

The advice of the state superintendent of public instruction shall be solicited in order to assure the district’s eligibility for state financial assistance.

Non-Voter Approved Debt

If the board decides it is prudent, it may authorize the issuance of non-voter approved debt within statutory limits to purchase facility sites; improve energy efficiency of buildings; or acquire, remodel or repair school facilities. Statute limits non-voter approved school district debt to three-eights of one percent of the value of the taxable land within the district.

Bonds

If the board determines that there are insufficient moneys in the building fund for a construction project, the board chooses not to authorize an election for a capital levy, and the district’s limit on bonded indebtedness has not been reached, the board shall authorize an election to seek the approval of voters to issue bonds in the amount needed for the project.

The legal requirements for bond elections and subsequent issuance and redemption of bonds shall be met. The resolution adopted by the board calling for the bond election shall specify the purposes of the bond including the specific buildings to be constructed or remodeled and any other purposes authorized in RCW 28A.530.010.

The board resolution shall also describe the specific purposes the board anticipates for using any state financing assistance, if any. If circumstances alter the purposes for which the board believes it is in the best interest of the district to use the state funds or those raised through the bond, the board shall conduct a public hearing to consider the circumstances and to receive public testimony. At a meeting subsequent to the public hearing the board may either amend its original resolution or adopt a new one describing the specific purposes to which the state and/or bond funds will be put.

Upon the sale of bonds duly authorized as prescribed by law, the proceeds shall be credited by the county treasurer to the appropriate fund of the district.

Notice of intent to apply for state school construction funds shall be submitted to the state board of education prior to submitting a bond proposal to district voters.

Legal References:
RCW 28A.320.310 Investment of building funds–Restrictions
RCW 28A.525.020 Duties of state board of education
RCW 28A.525.080 Federal grants–Rules and regulations
RCW 28A.530 District Bonds for Lands, Buildings and Equipment
RCW 28A.530.030 Disposition of bond proceeds – Capital projects fund
RCW 28A.530.080 Additional authority to contract indebtedness
RCW 39.36.020 Limitation of indebtedness prescribed
WAC 392-123-180 Bond Proceeds

Adoption Date: 04/27/2006
Raymond School District #116



6920—CONSTRUCTION DESIGN

Facilities will be designed to accommodate the educational and instructional needs of the district. The professional experience and judgment of staff will be used in developing such educational specifications. The law requires that special attention be given the accessibility to the education program by students of both sexes and those with disabilities. The superintendent will see that all construction projects comply with the requirements for accessibility to individuals with disabilities and comparability between the sexes.

After determining that a need for new or improved facilities exists, the board, with the guidance of its professional staff, will engage in the following processes:

A. Engage construction management services;

B. Select an architect;

C. Review a site evaluation including an assessment of existing facilities, if any, on the site;

D. Develop educational specifications recognizing instructional needs and available financial resources;

E. Review and approve schematic design prepared by architect, assuring that the new or remodeled facility or part of a facility is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities;

F. Review a value engineering study and constructability review, and approve construction design including construction estimates;

G. Call for bids; and

H. Review and approve final construction contract.

The board will comply with the terms and conditions as specified in the contract between the architect and the school district.

Legal References:
Chapter 39.35 RCW Energy conservation in design of public Facilities
42 U.S.C. § 12101 et. seq. Americans with Disabilities Act
WAC 392-343-080 Value engineering studies, constructability reviews, and building commissioning — Requirements and definitions
WAC 392-343-102 Construction management
WAC 392-344-065 Value engineering contracts
WAC 392-344-066 Constructability review contracts
WAC 392-344-075 Contracts — Filing

Management Resources:

Policy News, October 2011 Policy Manual Revisions

Adoption Date: 12/12/11
Raymond School District #116



6920P—CONSTRUCTION DESIGN

Educational Specifications

Educational specifications are written after consultation with appropriate staff, consultants and citizens. The content of a set of educational specifications would include all or part of the following items:

A. A statement of the educational philosophy as it pertains to the specific construction project;

B. Community and School Characteristics:

1. The plan of organization and expected enrollments of the school:

a. Grade levels; and

b. Maximum expected enrollments with trends and projections, if necessary.

2. The construction plan for the facility is it to be a new facility, an addition, or a phased program leading to a complete facility;

3. Special services to be provided:

a. Guidance programs;

b. Social worker’s programs;

c. Provisions for exceptional children; and

d. Others;

4. The special provisions needed for community use:

a. Cooperative park/school arrangement;

b. Parent-teacher associations;

c. Community athletic programs; and

d. Others;

5. The extent that adults will use this facility;

6. The extent to which students will be transported and the facilities that must be included to handle this service adequately;

7. The cafeteria services to be provided and the maximum number likely to be served;

8. The policy regarding multiple use of spaces; and

9. Other pertinent data relating to the project;

C. Site Characteristics – site considerations necessary for this project:

a. Site size and location defined; and

b. Recommended building orientation; service drives; parking requirements for staff, students, and public; sidewalk and other approaches; outside lighting;

D. Requirements of the Physical Plant:

1. Instructional functions and spaces required. A statement of instructional purposes is to precede the description of each area:

a. Number of spaces required by function; and

b. The relationships of these spaces;

2. The non-instructional spaces required. Each space to be described by function and spaces required;

3. Relationships of spaces required:

a. Inter-relationship between instructional areas;

b. Relationship between instructional and non-instructional spaces; and

c. Relationship of spaces to site;

4. Environmental factors should be described in terms of educational relationships or concerns; and

E. Additional information or comments as necessary to further interpret the educational program.

Adoption Date: 02/23/12
Raymond School District #116



6921—EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

Facilities shall be designed to accommodate the educational and instructional needs of the district. The professional experience and judgment of staff shall be used in developing such educational specifications. The law requires that special attention be given the accessibility to the education program by students of both sexes and those with disabilities. The superintendent shall see that all construction projects comply with the requirements for accessibility to individuals with disabilities and comparability between the sexes.

Legal References:
42 U.S.C. §12101 et. seq. Americans with Disabilities Act
CFR 45, Part 84.23
WAC 392-190-050 Course offerings–Generally–Separate sessions or groups
Permissible

Adoption Date: 04/27/2006
Raymond School District #116



6921P—EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

Educational specifications are written after consultation with appropriate staff, consultants and citizens. The content of a set of educational specifications would include all or part of the following items:

  • A statement of the educational philosophy as it pertains to the specific construction project.
  • Community and School Characteristics
    • The plan of organization and expected enrollments of the school
      • grade levels
      • maximum expected enrollments with trends and projections, if necessary
    • The construction plan for the facility is it to be a new facility, an addition, or a phased program leading to a complete facility?
    • Special services to be provided
      • guidance programs
      • social worker’s programs
      • provisions for exceptional children
      • others
    • The special provisions needed for community use
      • cooperative park/school arrangement
      • parent-teacher associations
      • community athletic programs
      • other
    • The extent that adults shall use this facility
    • The extent to which students shall be transported and the facilities that must be included to handle this service adequately
    • The cafeteria services to be provided and the maximum number likely to be served
    • The policy regarding multiple use of spaces
    • Other pertinent data relating to the project
  • Site Characteristics
    • Site considerations necessary for this project
      • Site size and location defined
    • Recommended building orientation; service drives; parking requirements for staff, students, and public; sidewalk and other approaches; outside lighting.
  • Requirements of the Physical Plant
    • instructional functions and spaces required. A statement of instructional purposes is to precede the description of each area.
      • Number of spaces required by function
      • The relationships of these spaces
  • The non-instructional spaces required. Each space to be described by function and spaces required
  • Relationships of spaces required.
    • Inter-relationship between instructional areas
    • Relationship between instructional and non-instructional spaces
    • Relationship of spaces to site
  • Environmental factors should be described in terms of educational relationships or concerns

Additional information or comments as necessary to further interpret the educational program.

In light of the increasing cost and dwindling supply of conventional energy sources, a life cycle cost analysis shall be required of each major construction project. A life cycle cost analysis shall include a description of:

A. Insulation and heat retention factors;

B. Variable occupancy and operating conditions to be incurred by the facility;

C. Overall supply and demand of the facility’s energy system and actual or potential utilization of outside energy sources, such as climate;

D. Initial cost of energy plant; and

E. An energy consumption analysis comparing alternative energy systems.

F. As part of its commitment to energy conservation, the district shall consider the use of at least one renewable energy system such as solar energy, wind or wood or wood waste, geothermal, or other non-conventional fuels in any construction or renovation project.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 6810 Energy Management/Education

Legal References:
RCW 39.35 Energy conservation in design of public facilities
WAC 180-30-406 Energy conservation program — Life cycle cost analysis

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6925—ARCHITECT AND ENGINEERING SERVICES

When considering the acquisition of architectural and engineering services the board of directors shall issue a notice in publication(s) of general circulation stating the general scope and nature of project(s) for which services are required. Effort shall be made to inform firms who employ minorities and/or women.

Interested firms will be requested to submit a statement of qualifications and performance data to enable the board to determine which architectural or engineering firm will best serve the needs of the district. Criteria for selection of a firm shall include, but not be limited to, quality and breadth of staff, design of similar projects, production capability, supervision and quality control, relationship with clients, cost estimates and budget control.

The superintendent is directed to establish necessary procedures to solicit and screen qualified engineers and architects. The superintendent shall recommend one or more firms to the board for its consideration. The board and the successful architectural or engineering firm shall enter into a contract for the necessary services. In the event of an emergency, the board may waive this selection process and secure such services as needed.

Cross Reference:
Board Policy 6220 Purchasing: Bids and Contracts

Legal References:
RCW 28A.330.100(3) Additional powers of boards (1st class)
RCW 39.80 Contracts for architectural and engineering services
AGO 57-59 No. 68 Architects’ contracts

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116


6925P—SELECTION OF ARCHITECTS OR ENGINEERS

When architectural and engineering services are required by the district, the following procedures shall be in effect:

A. Announcement for professional services will be sent to professional and community publications as well as to publications specifically oriented toward minority and women owned firms. The announcement shall specify:

  1. the general nature and scope of the project(s);
  2. the district representative to contact for further details; and
  3. the deadline for submission of letter of interest.

B. Each interested architect and/or engineer shall be advised to submit a resume which includes as a minimum:

  1. description of professional staff and respective roles for each;
  2. list of projects completed during the past two years and contact person;
  3. status of current contract;
  4. description of typical site supervision;
  5. references–bank, bonding company, three clients; and
  6. exhibits of cost estimates for two most recent projects.

C. Applicants shall be screened by selected staff to identify firms to be interviewed.

D. Applicants shall be interviewed by a committee composed of the superintendent, supervisor of maintenance and a building principal.

E. The superintendent shall enter into negotiations with the firm(s) to establish a professional services fee which is fair and reasonable. If the superintendent is unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract, the next highest ranked firm will be contacted.

F. The tentative contract will be referred to the board as a recommendation.



6950—CONTRACTOR ASSURANCES, SURETY BONDS AND INSURANCE

A contract will only be entered into with a contractor who is licensed or registered as required by the laws of this state. A contractor will be granted a contract when a statement is submitted and sworn to which states that the contractor is in compliance with the state laws relating to prevailing wage for public works and with state and federal laws relating to nondiscrimination in hiring. Such a statement may be a provision or clause in the contract.

Contractor Surety Bonds and Insurance

Each contractor’s bid must be accompanied by a certified or cashier’s check, or bid bond in the amount of at least five percent of the total bid amount, excluding taxes. Bid deposits pursuant to this policy may be based upon the architect’s estimated cost of construction. Any bid which is not successful will entitle the bidder to a refund of its security or bond. The successful bidder will have the bond or security retained until such a time as it is determined that the bidder will complete the contract. All bids received will specify whether the district or the contractor will carry fire, liability, or other insurance during construction.

The successful bidder is required to make, execute and deliver to the board a good and sufficient performance bond with two or more sureties or a surety company which will state that the contractor will execute and faithfully perform the provisions of the contract and will pay all subcontractors and material men as required by law.

Change Orders

The board will approve authorized change orders which arise during construction. In order to facilitate to timely progress during construction, the board may grant the superintendent authority to authorize change orders if additional cost to the district does not exceed the approved contingency for the project or extend beyond its original scope.

Legal References:
RCW 39.06.010 Contracts with unregistered or unlicensed contractors and with other violators prohibited
39.08.010 Bond required — Conditions- Retention of contract amount in lieu of bond — Contracts of one-hundred-thousand dollars or less
Chapter 39.12 RCW Prevailing wages on public works
49.60.180 Unfair practices of employment
42 U.S.C. 2000c et. seq. Title VII of Civil Rights Act of 1964 (amended by CRA of 1991);
29 USC 794 Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973

Adoption Date: 02/23/12
Raymond School District #116



6955—MAINTENANCE OF RECORDS

The maintenance of adequate records is vitally important to the future facilities program within the district and to the resolution of any disputes that may arise regarding a construction project.

The superintendent shall keep all reports, documents and plans as they relate to an existing or proposed project. The records shall include copies of all correspondence relating to the project. The superintendent shall require from the architect, engineer, contractor or other parties at least the following, as they become available:

A. Inspection and progress reports;

B. Results from tests of material quality and composition, etc.;

C. Drawings of buildings and sites;

D. Conveyance records, title search, bond issuance records and any licenses and legal documents issued or executed pursuant to the project;

E. Guarantees and warranties; and

F. Other papers relevant to the project, such as the record of board resolutions.

Legal References:
RCW 39.04.020 Plans and specifications–Estimates–Publications—Emergencies
RCW 39.04.040 Work to be executed according to plans–Supplemental plans
RCW 39.04.070 Account and record of cost
RCW 39.04.080 Certified copy to be filed–Engineers’ certificate
RCW 39.04.100 Records open to public inspection–Certified copies

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6957—CHANGE ORDERS

Change orders which arise during construction shall be individually considered by the board provided, however, that for each project the board may grant the superintendent authority to authorize change orders if additional cost to the district does not exceed $25,000.00 and provided that the total cost of all change orders approved has not exceeded five (5) percent of the approved total construction cost of the project. The superintendent shall advise the board of all change orders executed in such cases.

In the event a change order request exceeding the authority of the superintendent or exceeding five percent (5%) of the total construction cost of the project must be considered between board meetings, the president of the board may provide interim authorization. The board shall take formal action on such requests at the next board meeting.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6959—ACCEPTANCE OF COMPLETED PROJECT

Final payment under contract shall be subject to the following:

A. Completion of building commissioning;

B. The architect’s letter of inspection indicating that the work has been completed;

C. Certification by the superintendent that no liens have been filed on the project, or if liens have been filed, a certified list of the liens and their respective order of priority; and

D. Written final acceptance by the board.

Pursuant to statute, final payment shall not be made until the district has received from the state department of revenue, state department of employment security, and state department of labor and industries certification that all taxes due, or to become due by the project’s contractor, have been paid in full. The superintendent shall notify each department listed that the work is completed and officially accepted so that a determination of tax liabilities of the contractor may be made.

The contract shall provide that a percentage of the project cost shall be retained by the district as required by law to insure that the project shall remain free and clear of any material men, subcontractor or tax liens. The district prefers that five percent of all moneys earned by the contractor be reserved by the district and will request that the state board of education acting through the superintendent of public instruction act as agent of the school district for managing the cash retainage. The district will accept a bond submitted by the contractor for any portion of the retainage in a form acceptable to the district, and the superintendent of public instruction if state funds are part of the project, from a bonding company registered with the Washington state insurance commissioner and on the currently authorized insurance list published by the Washington state insurance commissioner, unless the district can demonstrate good cause for refusing to accept the bond.

Legal Reference:
RCW 60.28 Lien for Labor, Materials, Taxes on Public Works
WAC392-343-080 Value engineering studies, constructability reviews, and building commissioning–Requirements and definition
WAC392-344-067 Building commissioning contracts
WAC392-344-075 Contracts–Filing
WAC392-344-147 Retained Percentage Law Related Requirements

Adoption Date: 5/23/00
Raymond School District #116



6970—NAMING FACILITIES

New district buildings shall be named after persons who have attained national or local prominence in the fields of education, arts and sciences, politics, military achievements and statesmanship, after past U.S. presidents or Washington national senators or representatives or after the geographic characteristics of the area in which the facility is located.

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116



6970P—NAMING FACILITIES

The naming of a school shall take place in the following manner:

A. The superintendent shall select a committee of, whose purpose it shall be to submit to the board a list of not less than three, nor more than five, names for the new school. The list shall briefly state, along with each name, why the committee nominated each name. The committee may solicit nominations from students and the community.

B. The committee shall, whenever possible, follow these guidelines:

  1. Each name shall be known to, and significant to, the people of the district.
  2. The names submitted shall not conflict with the names of other schools in the district or surrounding districts.
  3. The use of names of living persons shall be avoided unless the circumstances warrant an exception.

C. The board shall select the name of the new facility from the list. In recognition of the efforts of those involved in the project, a plaque containing the following information shall be attached to a new building:

  1. School name;
  2. Board-approved construction date;
  3. Completion or dedication date;
  4. Name of board members as of the board-approved construction date in the following order:
    1. President/Chairman
    2. Vice President/Vice Chairman
    3. Members (alphabetically)
  5. Superintendent as of board-approved construction date; and
  6. Architect and contractor names.

Formal dedication of the facility shall take place on a date and time specified by the board.



6971—WORKS OF ART

The state board of education and the state superintendent of public instruction allocates one-half of one percent of any moneys appropriated for state assistance to districts for original construction of any school facility for the acquisition of works of art. The district has the right to waive its use of the appropriation, such money will then be used by the Washington State Arts’ Commission for the purchase of other public art. The selection and commissioning of an artist for, reviewing of design for, execution and placement of, and the acceptance of works of art shall be the responsibility of the Washington State Arts’ Commission in consultation with the state superintendent of public instruction and the board. The school board may appoint a representative to be a part of the selection process; reject the results of the selection process; or reject the placement of a completed works of art. Waiver or rejection shall not affect state construction funds available to local school districts.

Legal Reference:
RCW 28A.335.210 Purchase of works of art-Procedures

Adoption Date: 3/24/98
Raymond School District #116

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